Equalization Program in Canada: Overview and Contemporary Issues

Feature by Jay Makarenko || Apr 24, 2008

The Equalization Program is an important component of Canadian federalism and the notion of equality between provinces regarding the social services they provide. Moreover, the principle of equalization has been a major source of debate in Canadian politics, between the federal and provincial levels of government, as well as between provinces. This article provides an overview of the purpose, operation and history of the Equalization Program, including a summary of key contemporary issues and debates.

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Auditor General of Canada: Role and Organization

Feature by Jay Makarenko || Apr 24, 2008

The Office of the Auditor General holds the federal government accountable for its use of public funds. However, the public is often unaware of the Auditor General’s official function and organization. This article introduces the Office of the Auditor General, including its role, legislative framework, history, basic organization and activities, as well as mechanisms of oversight.

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Federalism and the Atlantic Provinces: Contemporary Issues and Debates

Feature by Jay Makarenko || Feb 6, 2008

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p>Traditionally, Atlantic Canada has proven to be a strong ally of both Canadian federalism and of federal government involvement in its economic, social, and financial life. Nevertheless, the relations between the federal government and the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island have been strained at times. This article provides an introduction to key issues and debates in Canadian federalism by looking through the lens of Atlantic Canada.

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2008 Alberta General Election

Feature by Jay Makarenko || Feb 5, 2008

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p>On March 3, 2008, Alberta voters returned the Progressive Conservative Party to power for the eleventh consecutive time. The election was a landslide win for the PC Party, whom improved both their seat total in the legislature and their share of the popular vote from the 2004 general election.

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The Opposition in the Canadian House of Commons: Role, Structure, and Powers

Feature by Jay Makarenko || Jan 30, 2008

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p>The opposition is an important element of the Canadian parliamentary tradition and the day-to-day operation of government. This article examines the role, structure and powers of the opposition in Canada’s premier national legislature, the House of Commons.

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Canadian Federalism and Public Health Care: The Evolution of Federal-Provincial Relations

One of the most critical issues in Canadian federalism since the 1950s has been the delivery of public health care. This article provides an introduction to the nature and evolution of federal and provincial relations in the area of health care policy, with particular focus on the fiscal and policy aspects and their impact. Included is a discussion of the basic division of powers in health care, Canadian federalism and the introduction of public health care, and shifts in this federal-provincial relationship since the 1950s.

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Federalism in Canada: Basic Framework and Operation

Feature by Jay Makarenko || Jan 11, 2008

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p>Central to the organization of government in Canada is the principle of federalism. Under this principle, Canada is divided into two constitutionally autonomous levels of government: the federal or central government, and the provincial governments. The nation’s basic division of government plays an important role in public finances and public policy.

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Fiscal Imbalance Debate: Origins and Perspectives

Feature by Brian Doody || Dec 18, 2007

Federal-provincial relations in Canada have been dominated in recent years by debate over the “fiscal imbalance,” defined as the apparent shortfall of provincial g