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Bonam    81

Here's a rare occurrence. An RPG (not SAM-7 Grail) hit on an Mi-8 Hip. Keeps flying...lol. Strong like bull. Smart like tractor. You just gotta love how the Allahu Akbars change in tone...

Hahaha, the audio is hilarious.

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DogOnPorch    878

Hahaha, the audio is hilarious.

Allahu Akbar!!!! Allahhu Akbar!!! Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar? Allahu Akbar?? WTF? Alluhu Akbar???

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Bonam    81

Allahu Akbar!!!! Allahhu Akbar!!! Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar? Allahu Akbar?? WTF? Alluhu Akbar???

You gotta wonder about the mental capacity of people who are only able to articulate a 2 word phrase, regardless of the situation. Whether it's the helicopter flying overhead, the rpg hitting the helicopter, or the helicopter surviving the hit, there's only two words that come to mind apparently.

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DogOnPorch    878

You gotta wonder about the mental capacity of people who are only able to articulate a 2 word phrase, regardless of the situation. Whether it's the helicopter flying overhead, the rpg hitting the helicopter, or the helicopter surviving the hit, there's only two words that come to mind apparently.

Different helicopter...different results...same Allahu Akbar.

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DogOnPorch    878

laugh.png

Well, over 3000 Hueys were lost alone in the war, so their aim must have been off.........

They did, indeed, learn quick. Life Magazine did a great article/photo spread on Choctaw operations with ARVN forces in the early-mid 60s.

01_cover1.jpg?w=679

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Fletch 27    0

the jets are sorely needed to replace the aged fleet of death-traps canada has now. Bring on the jets

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Guest Derek L   
Guest Derek L

And for the life of me, I don’t understand why you’re harping about a single engine……….Even with 4th generation aircraft, there is no greater loss rate in aircraft due to having only a single engine………Namely because the two major causes of engine failures in combat aircraft are fuel contamination or battle damage, and such causes will cause the loss of the aircraft regardless of the number of engines.

Does anybody remember the Hornet crash we had a few years ago at an air show? Well here’s the final accident investigation report:

http://www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/dfs-dsv/nr-sp/index-eng.asp?id=11159

The investigation revealed a number of factors that contributed to this occurrence. The engine malfunction was likely the result of a stuck ratio boost piston in the right engine main fuel control (MFC) that prevented the engine from advancing above flight idle when maximum afterburner was selected. The large thrust imbalance between the left and the right engines caused the aircraft to depart controlled flight and the aircraft was unrecoverable within the altitude available. The subtle nature of the engine malfunction that was not detected by the pilot when the overshoot was attempted.

And what is one of the major causes behind pistons that stick/seize? Why sediment and foreign particles within the fuel lines……………..The gremlin that causes such problems doesn’t differentiate between single (F-35) or multiengine (Hornet) aircraft………and in this case (like most), the second engine, though not effected by the MFC failure, didn’t change the outcome of the event.

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………and in this case (like most), the second engine, though not effected by the MFC failure, didn’t change the outcome of the event.

This is a tale about the MFC that got away. Over two deployments to Kansas and one to Quebec, maintenance crews tweaked the fuel density setting instead of changing out the MFC per procedures. And to your point, two engines can contribute to a redundancy mind set that is forgiving of such things.

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DogOnPorch    878

This is a tale about the MFC that got away. Over two deployments to Kansas and one to Quebec, maintenance crews tweaked the fuel density setting instead of changing out the MFC per procedures. And to your point, two engines can contribute to a redundancy mind set that is forgiving of such things.

Jet B to Jet A1 to Jet A can lead to issues, as well. Not sure if the RCAF uses Jet B.

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Guest Derek L   
Guest Derek L

This is a tale about the MFC that got away. Over two deployments to Kansas and one to Quebec, maintenance crews tweaked the fuel density setting instead of changing out the MFC per procedures. And to your point, two engines can contribute to a redundancy mind set that is forgiving of such things.

From what I understand, the problematic engine had only just be installed in the aircraft that later crashed, with the prior aircraft it had been installed in, experiencing “engine problems” a few months earlier……..Said storey, when one is coming from the MH community such as myself, is all too common and symptomatic of an aircraft that is “tired” and should have already been replaced…….

I’m glad this didn’t land on the ground crews, since on a daily basis they do their best Lazarus show……..8 times a week, twice on Sunday…..stay for the buffet wink.png

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Guest Derek L   
Guest Derek L

Jet B to Jet A1 to Jet A can lead to issues, as well. Not sure if the RCAF uses Jet B.

JP-8.

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..Said storey, when one is coming from the MH community such as myself, is all too common and symptomatic of an aircraft that is “tired” and should have already been replaced…….

Completely unrelated, the accident report about the aluminum sleeved MFC reminded me of my $2,000 transmission job on a Ford Taurus back in 1995. To save money, Ford used aluminum servo pistons instead of steel, and mine went south (after the warranty period, of course). Good thing Ford Tauruses can't fly.

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Guest Derek L   
Guest Derek L

Is that a naptha mix?

The intent is quite the opposite.........all sorts of things not found in commercial jet fuel that help inhibit it to a degree from going boom and freezing.

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Guest Derek L   
Guest Derek L

Completely unrelated, the accident report about the aluminum sleeved MFC reminded me of my $2,000 transmission job on a Ford Taurus back in 1995. To save money, Ford used aluminum servo pistons instead of steel, and mine went south (after the warranty period, of course). Good thing Ford Tauruses can't fly.

Canadians have perfected the art of throwing good money after bad……..Many here are certified experts at spending $100 to save $10 wink.png

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login    0

you mean the... two bombing efforts... Bosnia and recent months Libya? Well, make it 3 since a few bombs were also dropped during Bush 41s "Gulf War 1" missive.

let's also be clear, Libya was nothing more than a means to an end for Harper/MacKay to push their military fervour and presume to solidify a justification for the failed F-35 pursuits.

is it your assertion that participating in these most limited campaigns, spread across literally decades in time, is a warranted justification for the financial expenditures associated with the CF-18 aircraft?

But apparently the cf-18s arn't good enough for Syria, so we can't bomb with them anymore. Hmm, now what do we do, amphibious assaults like Dieppe, won't people die, is there no solution?

Yeah I would want to be in that boat... and with chemical weapons being able to hit people on the ground!!!! woe is me.

Edited by login

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DogOnPorch    878

The intent is quite the opposite.........all sorts of things not found in commercial jet fuel that help inhibit it to a degree from going boom and freezing.

The various cold weather/low flash mixes started out with B-36 SAC flights to Alaska during the dead of winter, I think. Hard to keep those early jet engines burning in the super cold conditions on the ground let alone at altitude. The prop engines would start...but not the jet pods. They tried all sorts of things like recycling the intake air via blowers or keeping the jet engines a running all night. I bet those were hairy times as ground crew.

Edited by DogOnPorch

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DogOnPorch    878

Completely unrelated, the accident report about the aluminum sleeved MFC reminded me of my $2,000 transmission job on a Ford Taurus back in 1995. To save money, Ford used aluminum servo pistons instead of steel, and mine went south (after the warranty period, of course). Good thing Ford Tauruses can't fly.

My old Sable's heater core used to give-out on a regular basis. Thankfully and conveniently, it was located right behind dash board/control panel. That required removing the front seats, dropping the steering and hoping the wiring harness didn't let loose before you got to mark everything. There was a time when it was located in the engine compartment on most cars. But, then...in those days there was enough room under the hood for a family of four plus in-laws.

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Topaz    32

All this could be for nothing because IF one of those countries reduce or cancel their order the price for the plane goes up even more and the US may have to reduced or cancel their 2200 , which will up the price. The Tories have handled this very badly and it didn't have to be this way if they had only come clean that there were problems instead of spinning or even misleading Parliament. http://ca.news.yahoo.com/canadas-contentious-f-35-figures-danger-falling-off-093007064.html

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My old Sable's heater core used to give-out on a regular basis. Thankfully and conveniently....

Been there...done that...twice. My wife came out to the unheated garage (in a MN January) to see the Taurus's entire dashboard removed and laying on the fron seats. Getting to that damn heater core (and later the evaporator) was a major pain in the ass. My only reward came when I took it to the dealer to get the refrigerant recharged and the mechanic said he was impressed.

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DogOnPorch    878

Been there...done that...twice. My wife came out to the unheated garage (in a MN January) to see the Taurus's entire dashboard removed and laying on the fron seats. Getting to that damn heater core (and later the evaporator) was a major pain in the ass. My only reward came when I took it to the dealer to get the refrigerant recharged and the mechanic said he was impressed.

Yes it is a major job. I did it once only to find the NEW $%#&*$ core leaked. You might imagine even USMC members would have been offended by the language. Off the damn dash came AGAIN.

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