kimmy

This week in Islam

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This week in Islam, and Egypt specifically, Sisi suggested reforming the divorce law so that men had to apply for divorce instead of just being able to verbally divorce their wives (40% of Egyptian marriages end in divorce within 5 years, who knew).  Good, right?   But the "Islamic authority" said "nothing doing".  Bad, yup.   The article mentions that Sisi is a devout Muslim, so wanting to modernize divorce laws seems pretty progressive.   Unfortunately, he's hamstrung by even more 'devout' Muslims clerics.  

Also interesting is that Sisi has ordered standardized sermons on Fridays in the mosques, as a way to combat radicalization and extremism.  This has been criticized as limiting free speech.    

 

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NVM

Upon further research, I didn't trust this source.

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Edited by Goddess
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1 hour ago, Goddess said:

NVM

Upon further research, I didn't trust this source.

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I've done that. :)  Chrome has a plug-un that identifies suspect sites and that helps, but it doesn't catch them all.

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Tunisia is the closest to what could be called a success story of the Arab Spring.   Although there are struggles and setbacks, the country seems determined to work toward freedom and democracy, based on the example set by the US.   Some excerpts from an interview with Meherzia Labidi , a female elected to Tunisia's Parliament.    

Tunisia's government is focused on using the best principles of the Islamic religion and developing a state where everyone is equally valued.

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"Ennahda (political party) doesn't tell Tunisians how to be good Muslims," said Labidi. "We are not a party telling people what to eat, what to dress or how to pray."

Instead, she explained, "we are a party that takes inspiration from Islamic values. And these values meet universal values — justice, solidarity, respect of human dignity, liberty." They don't seek theocracy, but a "civil state" where the differences between Islamists and secularists can be bridged and reconciled in a stable, pluralist democracy.

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"We had confrontation, we had polarization. We were struck by terrorism," she said. "But we had political leaders who are visionary and audacious, who risked dialogue, instead of going to the dynamic of confrontation."

 
 
 
 

As one of the leaders of the group tasked with developing Tunisia's constitution, Labidi says:

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"One of the first documents we had on the table, translated from English to Arabic, was the American constitution," she said. 

 
 
 

 

She believes there is a lasting legacy from the Arab Spring, despite disappointments and setbacks, such as Sisi's coup in Egypt.

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 "We have changed from the era of accepting dictatorship to another era of acting, of saying listen to us," she said. "There is something irreversible in the minds of Arab populations. We have chosen freedom."

 
 

And the United States is still a role model for achieving freedom and democracy in their country.  

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Labidi said, she still sees the United States as a source of inspiration. "I don't believe America will give up supporting democracies," she said. "No, not even if someone applies the brakes for a while. There is something special about this country."

 

 

I hope Tunisia can continue their journey toward a free society and become an example and a beacon for other Arabs and Arab countries.   

 

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On 2017-02-05 at 0:42 PM, Argus said:

The difference is not that there are laws against it and that they're enforced. The difference is that kind of behaviour is unacceptable in our culture. Even young men get that, except when they're particularly drunk or stupid.

I think the cultural values come first, then protected by laws. In other cultures, such as some in Africa and the Middle East, they either don't think it's a big deal to abuse women or they simply don't care. It is definitely this culture that needs to be annihilated.

Edited by OftenWrong
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On 1/10/2017 at 2:02 PM, eyeball said:

So if the war is being prosecuted by a democratically elected government then why shouldn't the people who voted for that government be considered legitimate targets?

How do terrorists/freedom-fighters tell us voters apart if we don't wear uniforms? 

 guess you'll have to stay hidden in your tree, so you'll won't be mistaken for a voter....

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If a country chooses to ban a group of certain religion, they have the right to do that.

Just like companies have the right to hire and fire who they want, countries should be allowed to do the same.

Religion is also something personal so it has absolutely NO PLACE in a way a country sets it's laws and rules.

If a country chooses to ban a certain religion, they should have the right to do that.

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13 minutes ago, AlexBoyKing said:

If a country chooses to ban a group of certain religion, they have the right to do that.

Just like companies have the right to hire and fire who they want, countries should be allowed to do the same.

Religion is also something personal so it has absolutely NO PLACE in a way a country sets it's laws and rules.

If a country chooses to ban a certain religion, they should have the right to do that.

I fully agree with sentence # 3.

The others, not so much.

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This week in Islam we get a pretty clear and brutal idea of the wildly differing cultural values of Canada vs that of Afghanistan and similar Muslim countries. A huge armed mob surrounded a police station in Afghanistan, shooting several police in order to take away two prisoners who had recently been arrested and kill them. Their crime? Murder? Child rape? Nope. Adultery.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world/mob-kills-eloped-lovers-after-storming-afghan-police-station

 

 

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