Federal Elections

Federal Campaign Finance Laws in Canada

Feature by Jay Makarenko || Jul 21, 2009

Campaign finance refers to the rules that govern the use of money in electoral processes such as general elections, by-elections, and referenda. In this context, Canada has adopted a broad set of rules in relation to key political actors, including election candidates, political parties, electoral district associations, and third parties. This article provides an introduction to federal campaign finance laws, including their history, content, and administration. It also explores a number of key issues regarding the regulation of money in elections.

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Cartoon: Was Prime Minister Harper too Passive in the Leaders Debate?

Find a political cartoon depicting Prime Minister Stephen Harper being too passive during the 2008 federal election in Canada.

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On Airplanes, Footballs and Tanks

By Jonathan Rose on Sep 17, 2008

Yesterday the Liberal party campaign plane made an unscheduled stop in Montreal. We are told that there was a problem in the Liberal's aging Boeing 737. Thankfully the malfunction was minor and no one was hurt.This should have been the end of it but for the media it was a great stand-in for the entire campaign.

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Cartoon: Liberal Election Strategy - Our Fraud Is Not as Bad

Find a political cartoon depicting Stephane Dion considering a questionable new election strategy to combat the Conservative Party of Canada.

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Important Links For Federal Elections

By Greg Farries on Sep 21, 2007

A long list of important links have been posted to the Federal Elections section of the Voter Almanac.

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Almanac: 1911 Federal Election in Canada

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p>Since 1896, Wilfrid Laurier’s Liberals had been in power.

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Almanac: Federal Election Info

Find detailed information on federal political parties in Canada and links to related features and political cartoons.

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Voter Turnout in Canada

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p>Since the 1980s, voter turnout in federal elections has fallen sharply. In the 1988 general election, 75 percent of eligible voters participated.

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