Jump to content
Political Discussion Forums

dialamah

Members
  • Content Count

    4,315
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    11

dialamah last won the day on July 4

dialamah had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

422 Excellent

1 Follower

About dialamah

  • Rank
    Full Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

Recent Profile Visitors

17,275 profile views
  1. dialamah

    War of the Worlds U.N. Migration Compact

    You referred to people who care about the world as narcissists. That isn't criticism, its painting those who disagree with you as evil.
  2. dialamah

    War of the Worlds U.N. Migration Compact

    Such a sin to care about others. Who knew?
  3. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    Islamic culture is approximately 50 years behind Western culture in terms of what is socially acceptable. For example, it was legal to rape your wife until the 1980s, in Canada. My mother had to get my father's permission to get birth control in the late 50s. If a woman was beaten, society and the law looked the other way; that started to change in the 60s and 70s. We were still arresting gay people in the 70s, and gay bashing/killing was still fairly popular until the 80s, despite being illegal. Yes, we are certainly more progressive than virtually any Islamic country, not to mention virtually every country in the world, but that progress is measured in decades, not centuries.
  4. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    So? Christians claim the Bible is the Word of God. Nonetheless, the practice of Christianity is quite different now than it was even a couple hundred years ago. Does God change his mind on a regular basis, or have Christians changed the way they interpret his Word?
  5. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    Yup. Sure, miscreants and good people both. But the inbuilt flexibility of holy books/religion is why people can move past the worst kinds of religious teachings. If not, we'd still be burning witches over here. Anyway, I thought you supported the reform of Islam? If it were true that the only correct interpretation is always the very worst, they would not be able to reform. Fortunately, thats not true - which is why we can see gay mosques and female run mosques, gay women in hijabs, and Muslim women uncovered. Denying that Muslims can interpret their holy book in both good and bad ways seems odd to me. As odd as it would be if DoP were insisting that all Christians must reject Gays because the Bible says so.
  6. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    Here let me quote you what I said to DoP: Let me repeat: People interpret their holy books however they want. So we can have hardline Christians like Betsy, or gentle ones like my very devout Catholic friend who offers acceptance even to gay people. We can have Christians who think they should not bake cakes for gay weddings, and Christians who will perform gay marriages, celebrate and honor them. In the same way, we can have Muslims who think that women must cover and Muslims who think they don't need to. We can also have Muslims who believe gays cannot be Muslims and Muslims who open gay mosques and gay Muslim women who wear hijab. People interpret their holy books however they want and that doesn't change no matter how often DoP chooses to quote the quran in his ongoing attempts to paint Muslims as extremists.
  7. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    So you are kind of like a talking doll, your string gets pulled and you recite the Koran with no sense of how it applies in the lives of Muslims today. Got it.
  8. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    I don't know why you think I, or anyone reasonably sane, would be persuaded by what the Quran says Muslims should do any more than anyone sane is persuaded by what the Bible says Christians should do. People interpret their holy books however they want, and Muslims are not bound by your interpretation, extremist as it is. A Muslim woman who decides not to cover is a Muslim just as much as a woman who does.
  9. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    Is this any less of a "slap in the face" to the women who freely exercise their right to wear the hijab as a symbol of their faith and the value they put on it. Where I live, I see Muslim women in groups, bare headed and with hijabs, ocaasionally a woman in a niqab is with them. I can't tell from that grouping if they are family or friends, or if covered women are trying to persuade the uncovered woman to change or if the one uncovered is explaining to the others why covering is wrong. Neither can you. Belittling the covered ones as either "slapping" the face of those who don't have choice, or assuming they are oppressed based on nothing more than what you think should be universally true makes no sense to me. Supporting laws that essentially remove choice for women, while claiming its to "save" them is one of the hallmarks of paternalism and patriarchy, whether the choice removed is to cover or to uncover. Especially when neither option provides benefit to the women who really are oppressed.
  10. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    You state here, often, that you believe women who wear the hijab are almost universally coerced to do so, either directly through family or indirectly through social pressure within the Muslim community. You also have said you support the State limiting the wearing of the hijab. You have been quite articulate about what you believe the hijab means, and how inappropriate it is in a Western country. This doesn't mean you would go around and rip hijabs off women's heads. I would never expect that of you and have never even come close to suggesting you would do such a thing. So why did you twist around what I said? Yes. Do you?
  11. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    Agreed. That I consciously resist doing this doesn't mean I don't anyway. I am always catching myself making assumptions about people before knowing anything about them. Pretty human trait, I'd say, but not necessary. "Shut the truth out". I have heard and seen Muslim women say they "choose" to wear hijab and I am willing to respect that, at an individual level, regardless of how I view the hijab in the context of Islamic female oppression. Perhaps the people shutting the truth out are those who see the hijab as proof positive that the wearer is oppressed and/or an extremist, regardless of what she herself might say, if she was asked. Nah, you are just a little confused is all. Not trying to convince you of that. At most, I object to you making assumptions about these women and apparently deciding it is your duty, and your right, to dictate to these women what they may or may not wear, and expecting or wanting the government to impose your beliefs on them. There are enough women who "choose" the hijab that doing anything but accepting them seems wrong to me. That doesn't mean I am unaware or do not wonder if a woman is "choosing" or not. Aware of the potential of coercion is why I would likely support legislation limiting them to adult women, or at least age 15 or 16. Younger than that and the "freedom" from parental influence seems too suspect, to me. Same reason why I give Khadr the benefit of the doubt on his terrorists activities, by the way.
  12. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    Probably not. And I repeat: Muslims have a much broader range of beliefs than Nazis or KKK members. Attempting to define them all according to the most extreme example does not work. It makes as little sense as assuming that wearing a crucifix means someone believes exactly as Betsy does - abortion is wrong, gays are evil and liberals are going to hell. A crucifix would likely indicate the wearer has a strong religious faith, but beyond that you'd have to talk to them to know just exactly what that means to them. That is the benefit of the doubt I give to Muslims.
  13. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    What other group, specifically?
  14. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    The difference being that I say "She could be forced, she might want to wear it, she might be very progressive or even gay, even in a hijab. More information is needed". Others say "She is wearing a hijab, I have all the information I need, she and/or her husband is an extremist, cannot be progressive, cannot be gay."
  15. dialamah

    This week in Islam

    Yup, I did. Doesn't mean that any individual IS being forced, however, just as its not a guarantee that a woman with a black eye got it from her husband, despite the prevalence of domestic abuse. However much one might suspect, they aren't going to send the cops around to arrest her husband without at least "talking" to her to find out exactly what is happening. Why would we treat a woman in a hijab any differently? KKK is a group that was specifically formed to combat the government policy of reconstruction at the time, which included elevating the rights of Black people. Its belief system is simple and limited to a belief in the supremacy of the White race. Islam is a religion with a huge variety of beliefs, many sects and 1.5 billion adherents running the gamut from pacifist to violent extremist; from socially progressive to socially conservative. Attempts to compare the two groups fail.
×