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jennie

Boycott Catholic, Anglican, United churches

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Please print off and distribute this statement in Catholic, Anglican and United Churches across Canada - place them in the collection plates and deliver them to the church offices - and feel free to submit them anonymously as well.

Pledge of Conscience

I, the undersigned, cannot in good conscience contribute money to this church until it returns the remains of the children who died under its care, in Indian Residential Schools and hospitals, and fully discloses their fate and cause of death.

Until this occurs, I am refraining from financially supporting this church. I will not make any form of donation or pledge to this church, nor will I rent your facilities. I will urge others to conduct a similar boycott of your institution.

______________________________

Name

______________________________

Date

Read and Hear the truth of Genocide in Canada, past and present, at this website: www.hiddenfromhistory.org

“Kevin is more deserving of the Nobel Peace Prize than many who have received it in the past.”

- Dr. Noam Chomsky

Institute Professor Emeritus

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

“A courageous and inspiring man."

- Mairead Corrigan-Maguire

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate

Belfast , Northern Ireland

Award winning Canadian documentary film:

UNREPENTANT:Canada's Genocide

http://tinyurl.com/2ve3tm

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Could you produce a small Shard of proof for your assertion that their are bodies? Where are they buried? More children in NS died as a result of a private interprise know as "The Butter Box Babies" than Natives in NS. I agree the Catholic Church was intrumental in causing great harm to the Native Community, but the government of the day was the one who gave them carte blance to "Integrate" them into civilized society.

I'd be happy to converse on this issue but when I read this bit: Dr. Noam Chomsky

Institute Professor Emeritus

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Anne Coultare and he are the same coin just different sides, he's a bitter angry old man.

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Noam Chomsky - wouldn't get involved with anything that has his name on it... bodies - my foot...

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Could you produce a small Shard of proof for your assertion that their are bodies? Where are they buried? More children in NS died as a result of a private interprise know as "The Butter Box Babies" than Natives in NS. I agree the Catholic Church was intrumental in causing great harm to the Native Community, but the government of the day was the one who gave them carte blance to "Integrate" them into civilized society.

I'd be happy to converse on this issue but when I read this bit: Dr. Noam Chomsky

Institute Professor Emeritus

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Anne Coultare and he are the same coin just different sides, he's a bitter angry old man.

Watch the film.

Ask their families. <_<

Catholic, Anglican, United.

The churches have the bodies.

Edited by jennie

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The only other place on the net that this thing is found is on babble.ca, and was posted by someone named "saga" who has her own message board:

http://cfar.proboards104.com/

Seems as though she's really the only person who posts on it aside from a few others, and those that refer to her always use "G." I wonder why...?

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Could you produce a small Shard of proof for your assertion that their are bodies? Where are they buried? More children in NS died as a result of a private interprise know as "The Butter Box Babies" than Natives in NS. I agree the Catholic Church was intrumental in causing great harm to the Native Community, but the government of the day was the one who gave them carte blance to "Integrate" them into civilized society.

Most of the "butterbox babies" were born from the residential school abuse, and murdered.

Sometimes their mothers were too. (Watch the CBC movie again ... they don't say it but you can see it.) Yes, the 'homes for unwed mothers' were private, and provided adoption for white children, but their 'cash cow' were the Indigenous students from the schools impregnated by abuse.

It wasn't just in Nova Scotia. That's only one story, the only one to ever surface. Somehow the RCMP were forced to act in that community. Amazing. There were homes like that everywhere across the country. If a student escaped from there, the RCMP would track them down and return them.

yay canada

At a school being torn down in BC, on the island I believe, rows and rows of infant skeletons were in the foundation. There was no home fro unwed mothers near that school, I guess, so they did the job themselves.

It is horrific.

Boycott the Catholic, Anglican and United churches until they pay attention.

It is up to them to bring the children home.

Yes moxie, there is that issue of Canadian government policy that supported these crimes against humanity committed here, on our behalf.

But first there are the children, their families.

The churches must act, must let the families know their children died, how they died, and where they are buried.

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So far I detect a moral vacuum.

Moral vacums are impossible to detect. Firstly it is not what is said - but what is not said that give clue to where the vacuum may be hiding.

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Why the hell would I darken a churches door now. Been able to avoid it for some time now so not about to do so for you.

It wasn't just in Nova Scotia. That's only one story, the only one to ever surface.

Hmm...only one story and none others ever surfaced? So....how do you know there is more? IOW you have no idea but presuppose that there may be.

OK...agenda first, facts second

Got it ...carry on.

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Primate urges Prime Minister to apologize for residential schools

What follows is the text of a letter to Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper from Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.

The Rt. Hon. Stephen Harper

Prime Minister

Government of Canada

Fax: 613-941-6900

Dear Prime Minister,

On behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada, I am writing to convey to you my strong disappointment and sadness at your refusal to offer an apology to Aboriginal Canadians who are former students of Indian Residential Schools, and to their families, as reported this morning in The Globe & Mail.

The stated goal of the assimilation policy of the Government of Canada in former times was, in the words of Indian Affairs deputy superintendent Duncan Campbell Scott, “to continue until there is not a single Indian in Canada that has not been absorbed into the body politic”. The main vehicle to implement this policy was the system of Indian Residential Schools, by means of which children were removed from their homes and communities and placed in boarding school, where they were forbidden to speak their own languages, and where they were taught the culture of the colonizers. Many did not return to their homes and families for years; others died at the schools and their parents were never told of their deaths. While this policy did not succeed, nonetheless the pain, suffering and dysfunctionality witnessed today in Canadian Aboriginal communities and families is a direct result of the attempts to “take the Indian-ness out of the Indians.”

The Anglican Church of Canada was complicit in implementing the policy of assimilation. A total of 26 Indian Residential Schools were run by the Anglican Church, functioning as an agent of the Government of Canada. We are ashamed of this part of our history. In 1993 our former Primate, Archbishop Michael Peers, offered an apology on behalf of the whole church for the harm done by the residential schools system. Here is an excerpt from that apology:

I accept and I confess before God and you, our failures in the residential schools. We failed you. We failed ourselves. We failed God

I am sorry, more than I can say, that we were part of a system which took you and your children from home and family. I am sorry, more than I can say, that we tried to remake you in our image, taking from you your language and the signs of your identity. I am sorry, more than I can say, that in our schools so many were abused physically, sexually, culturally and emotionally. On behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada, I offer our apology

The Anglican Church of Canada has been participating in the current Alternative Dispute Resolution Process. We have been sending a church representative to ADR Hearings in the role of listener, to hear and receive the story of the survivor, and to offer an apology on behalf of the church. We have learned that for many survivors, the apology is at least as important as the financial compensation, if not more so. People whose lives have been shattered through no fault of their own, are immensely helped by having their suffering acknowledged and validated, and by hearing the words of apology.

Noting that we are not alone in requesting that an apology be made, I quote from the judgement issued by the Honourable Chief Justice Brenner, in the Supreme Court of British Columbia: “[35] Although I am making no order and am issuing no directions, I would respectfully request counsel for Canada to ask that the Prime Minister give consideration to issuing a full and unequivocal apology on behalf of the people of Canada in the House of Commons.”

Mr. Harper, I strongly urge you to reconsider your decision to refuse an apology to IRS former students and their families.

Sincerely,

+Andrew

The Most Reverend Andrew S. Hutchison

Primate

The Anglican Church of Canada

others died at the schools and their parents were never told of their deaths.

And their parents are still wondering what happened to their children who disappeared while in the care of the government and the churches. The Anglican Church at least acknowledges that children did die, and that parents were not told. I expect the latter was government policy.

A reporter with SunMedia did a series of articles on this story in the spring. Then the Globe and Mail jumped on board and gave it a government-friendly spin. The media demanded answers from Jim Prentice. Prentice obliged by saying there would be an immideiate investigation. Prentice was moved to another ministry. Strahl won't answer the question. Bob Watts from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission says they "don't know how they are going to do that". Translation: No federal resources have been allocated to investigate deaths of children in the residential schools. yay Canada ... How's that for "Truth"!

The federal government is shoving the issue under the carpet again, as criminally responsible people would, given a chance: How many criminals would do an investigation into their own crimes? Can't ask the RCMP, because they are implicated too: They rounded up the children at gunpoint to go to the schools, and when children escaped, they chased them down with dogs, and some died in their custody too.

Consequently, other methods are necessary to ensure that Canada has to face up to its deeds.

I hope some of you are understanding now that this is not a topic to be taken lightly, not a topic for your racist jabs. Grow up and show a little more respect, please, or go to another thread.

This is a topic of importance for all Canadians, and it is not going away until justice is done: bring the children home.

Tell the truth, for there is no reconciliation without truth ... first.

Edited by jennie

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Primate urges Prime Minister to apologize for residential schools

What follows is the text of a letter to Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper from Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.

The Rt. Hon. Stephen Harper

Prime Minister

Government of Canada

Fax: 613-941-6900

Dear Prime Minister,

On behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada, I am writing to convey to you my strong disappointment and sadness at your refusal to offer an apology to Aboriginal Canadians who are former students of Indian Residential Schools, and to their families, as reported this morning in The Globe & Mail.

The stated goal of the assimilation policy of the Government of Canada in former times was, in the words of Indian Affairs deputy superintendent Duncan Campbell Scott, “to continue until there is not a single Indian in Canada that has not been absorbed into the body politic”. The main vehicle to implement this policy was the system of Indian Residential Schools, by means of which children were removed from their homes and communities and placed in boarding school, where they were forbidden to speak their own languages, and where they were taught the culture of the colonizers. Many did not return to their homes and families for years; others died at the schools and their parents were never told of their deaths. While this policy did not succeed, nonetheless the pain, suffering and dysfunctionality witnessed today in Canadian Aboriginal communities and families is a direct result of the attempts to “take the Indian-ness out of the Indians.”

The Anglican Church of Canada was complicit in implementing the policy of assimilation. A total of 26 Indian Residential Schools were run by the Anglican Church, functioning as an agent of the Government of Canada. We are ashamed of this part of our history. In 1993 our former Primate, Archbishop Michael Peers, offered an apology on behalf of the whole church for the harm done by the residential schools system. Here is an excerpt from that apology:

I accept and I confess before God and you, our failures in the residential schools. We failed you. We failed ourselves. We failed God

I am sorry, more than I can say, that we were part of a system which took you and your children from home and family. I am sorry, more than I can say, that we tried to remake you in our image, taking from you your language and the signs of your identity. I am sorry, more than I can say, that in our schools so many were abused physically, sexually, culturally and emotionally. On behalf of the Anglican Church of Canada, I offer our apology

The Anglican Church of Canada has been participating in the current Alternative Dispute Resolution Process. We have been sending a church representative to ADR Hearings in the role of listener, to hear and receive the story of the survivor, and to offer an apology on behalf of the church. We have learned that for many survivors, the apology is at least as important as the financial compensation, if not more so. People whose lives have been shattered through no fault of their own, are immensely helped by having their suffering acknowledged and validated, and by hearing the words of apology.

Noting that we are not alone in requesting that an apology be made, I quote from the judgement issued by the Honourable Chief Justice Brenner, in the Supreme Court of British Columbia: “[35] Although I am making no order and am issuing no directions, I would respectfully request counsel for Canada to ask that the Prime Minister give consideration to issuing a full and unequivocal apology on behalf of the people of Canada in the House of Commons.”

Mr. Harper, I strongly urge you to reconsider your decision to refuse an apology to IRS former students and their families.

Sincerely,

+Andrew

The Most Reverend Andrew S. Hutchison

Primate

The Anglican Church of Canada

others died at the schools and their parents were never told of their deaths.

And their parents are still wondering what happened to their children who disappeared while in the care of the government and the churches. The Anglican Church at least acknowledges that children did die, and that parents were not told. I expect the latter was government policy.

A reporter with SunMedia did a series of articles on this story in the spring. Then the Globe and Mail jumped on board and gave it a government-friendly spin. The media demanded answers from Jim Prentice. Prentice obliged by saying there would be an immideiate investigation. Prentice was moved to another ministry. Strahl won't answer the question. Bob Watts from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission says they "don't know how they are going to do that". Translation: No federal resources have been allocated to investigate deaths of children in the residential schools. yay Canada ... How's that for "Truth"!

The federal government is shoving the issue under the carpet again, as criminally responsible people would, given a chance: How many criminals would do an investigation into their own crimes? Can't ask the RCMP, because they are implicated too: They rounded up the children at gunpoint to go to the schools, and when children escaped, they chased them down with dogs, and some died in their custody too.

Consequently, other methods are necessary to ensure that Canada has to face up to its deeds.

I hope some of you are understanding now that this is not a topic to be taken lightly, not a topic for your racist jabs. Grow up and show a little more respect, please, or go to another thread.

This is a topic of importance for all Canadians, and it is not going away until justice is done: bring the children home.

Tell the truth, for there is no reconciliation without truth ... first.

There is only one mention of a type of capital punishment in the New Testiment. "Those who harm one of these little ones will wish they were never born and will be tossed into the sea with a millstone tied to their neck" - that's a pretty sever statement..You can mess with my money - give me a tax problem - take my home away from me - (why do I feel like I am singing the blues) - take my wife from my bed - but if you mess with the children...there are no holds barred as far as retribution...somethings can be put aside and forgotten - but not the institutional harming of children...it is unforgivable.

..and as Jesus said should carry a severe and lasting penalty - death! But not today - we are to civilized to truely protect kids - we just use children as an excuse to look like we care - just look at that hypocritial child protection act..If you litigate against a government sponsored child protection group...you will find that once you have them cornered - protecting children is the last thing on their mind - in fact it was never on their parasitic minds.

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So far I detect a moral vacuum.

I think you vacuumed your morals up along time ago.

Regarding the Butterbox Babies, no they were not "Mostly" Native but in fact poor white women who got pregnant out of wedlock. Babies that were sick or appeared sick were left to die in their cribs, the healthy ones were sold to childless American Families. They wanted only "White" babies not biracial enfants. You really should stop rewriting history to suit your agenda. Poor white women have suffered equally to native women.

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I think you vacuumed your morals up along time ago.

Regarding the Butterbox Babies, no they were not "Mostly" Native but in fact poor white women who got pregnant out of wedlock. Babies that were sick or appeared sick were left to die in their cribs, the healthy ones were sold to childless American Families. They wanted only "White" babies not biracial enfants. You really should stop rewriting history to suit your agenda. Poor white women have suffered equally to native women.

Exactly, Moxie. You just need the rest of the story.

Biracial babies were not wanted for adoption, so they ended up in the butterboxes, along with others who were allowed to die.

Point being: In that place and other places, there were babies born of abuse at the residential schools, babies who did not survive. Where did they die? How did they die?

Even IF we could account for all of the students registered in the schools, and that has never been done or even attempted btw, many others may have died who were not 'registered'.

What kind of 'school' does not account for every students in its care? For every student not sent home at the end of the year? What kind of school doesn't even give an explanation for missing children?

And yet the churches have never accounted for any of the missing children.

It is time they did.

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Should have left them in the stone age, think of the hassels it would save now.

So we owe them for the schools, alright, that's reasonable, living people only with evidence. But first, they need to collectively pay for all the property damage and crime they've caused in Canada. Every last penny. If I'm expected to shoulder a collective expense on racial grounds, so can the Indians.

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I happened to be talking with a residential school survivor today. Notwithstanding that the government is trying to stiff him for two years worth of payment for his 4 year stay he is still chasing down justice.

Seems when he first applied, the government slapped him down by saying that they had no record of his attendance. Yet in 1952 the government order INAC to destroy all residential school records. They might have had a case since obviously his records were destroyed with many others. However, after talking with a friend of a friend a teacher suggested that he contact the school board where he finished high school, and sure enough they had a record of his entire school history - including the 4 years he was plugged into residential schools. After submitting that information he received a cheque for only half of the 4 years with no explanation. When he called to follow up and ask why he didn't receive the full payment some bureaucrat says he wasn't there for the whole school year and was ineligible for full payment. In his last two years he was off for 1 month in each year.

Seems the bureaucrats are still victimizing the survivors despite the judge who ruled the payments must be made ordering that the government cannot arbitrarily decide qualification.

He may end up having to go back to court to get his payment. Sad really - at 73 and having to wait for 65 years for justice, some government dimrod is trying to sodomize him.

Edited by Posit

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Should have left them in the stone age, think of the hassels it would save now.

I'm not sure they would have like your company in the stone age. At least they evolved, even if you didn't!

But first, they need to collectively pay for all the property damage and crime they've caused in Canada. Every last penny. If I'm expected to shoulder a collective expense on racial grounds, so can the Indians.

AH, but maybe we should go first. All the damage we have done to their lands and the illegal extraction of their resources would put us in the negative. I think you better quit while you're a head. You are quickly evolving into an sphincter over this topic.....

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Exactly, Moxie. You just need the rest of the story.

Biracial babies were not wanted for adoption, so they ended up in the butterboxes, along with others who were allowed to die.

Point being: In that place and other places, there were babies born of abuse at the residential schools, babies who did not survive. Where did they die? How did they die?

Even IF we could account for all of the students registered in the schools, and that has never been done or even attempted btw, many others may have died who were not 'registered'.

What kind of 'school' does not account for every students in its care? For every student not sent home at the end of the year? What kind of school doesn't even give an explanation for missing children?

And yet the churches have never accounted for any of the missing children.

It is time they did.

You've been banging this native drum on this forum quite loudly, but you don't seem to realize where the worst of the treatment native kids received. At home on the reservation.

Edited by sharkman

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You've been banging this native drum on this forum quite loudly, but you don't seem to realize the where the worst of the treatment native kids received. At home on the reservation.

Couldn't have said it better... isn't this drum banging becoming spam now?

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AH, but maybe we should go first. All the damage we have done to their lands and the illegal extraction of their resources would put us in the negative. I think you better quit while you're a head. You are quickly evolving into an sphincter over this topic.....

You know how much we pay into Indian affairs every year? Do you know the value of settlements in Canada? If you believe that, you have no idea of the true cost of the Indian problem. It's a social scourge that deminishes this country's ability to provide an improved standard of living to the majority. The problem and the cost is much bigger than you think. If tomorrow we treated them like everyone else (the least racist viewpoint here), Canada would be a more just, fair and wealthy place to live.

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Tell the truth, for there is no reconciliation without truth ... first.
And how about dealing with present rather than past problems? This is of a piece with Martin's pandering by suggesting an amnesty for Louis Riel.

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