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August1991

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Syed Soharwardy, head Imam, Calgary Islamic Centre:

When I initiated my complaint against Mr. Levant, I saw human rights commissions as a non-violent means of resolving differences among Canadians.

I was not aware of the controversies between the commissions and Canada's faith communities. I am thinking specifically of my friend Fred Henry, the Roman Catholic bishop of Calgary.

Upon learning about the difficulties he and other faith communities have encountered with the commissions, I withdrew my complaint against Mr. Levant.

....

There will always be pockets of Islamophobia in Canada, just like there are still pockets of anti-Semitism, racism and sexism.

However, I have learned that the best way to dispel misconceptions between our various cultures and communities is for us to meet face to face and learn from each other's similarities and difference.

This can only be accomplished in a society that respects freedom of expression, freedom of religion and all of our other democratic freedoms.

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Albertan Premier Ed Stelmach speaking in Quebec City about a proposed cap-and-trade quota system for CO2 emissions:

"There's only one inter-regional transfer of wealth in this country and it's called equalization," Mr. Stelmach said. "There won't be another one from the province of Alberta. And that's as straight an answer as I can give."
CanWest

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Eileen White, 26, creator of the Ottawa X-Philes fan forum on Facebook.

"When I went away to university and was exposed to the idea of critical thought and analysis, it was this whole idea of not accepting the status quo and not accepting what everybody around you is saying. It's not exactly paranoia, it's just trying to think critically about what you're being told."
Ottawa Sun

There's a difference between being a skeptic and being an intelligent skeptic. Does this woman also question what she's been told about the earth being round?

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You get a failing grade at critical analysis of that article, August.
Uh, what do they teach kids in schools these days?

This woman has apparently replaced "the scientific method" with "question authority". There's a difference.

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How sure can you be, August? How much of the interview was cut out, that there may have been more context that would have made it clear what she was saying. Second, you choose to interpret what she has said in the worst possible light, which is the not a mark of an intelligent critique. And to bring up the scientific method, which is difficult to use on information only. There is a reason that it is often said that economics and politics are more art than science. No where in that article does it say " I do not believe anything the governent says. " All she is implying is that she gives thought to what she hears instead of just accepting it blindly, as you would seem to prefer. Your remark about the Earth being flat is backwards. Critical thinking is not about questioning whether the Earth is round, it is about questioning the person who tries to tell you it is flat.

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Eileen White, 26, creator of the Ottawa X-Philes fan forum on Facebook.

Ottawa Sun

There's a difference between being a skeptic and being an intelligent skeptic. Does this woman also question what she's been told about the earth being round?

I am surprised she had to go away to University to be exposed to critical thought. Does everyone need to go away to University to be a critical thinker? Either elitism or a deprived upbringing is expressed here! I am inclined to rule out deprivation.

I also don't think a critical thinker is necessarily a skeptic. Skeptics are merely "critics" not critical thinkers.

Edited by Pliny

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Omnium rerum principia parva sunt. ~ Cicero

The beginnings of all things are small.

It just so happens to be what I think when people talk about how foolish it is to go after small countries that harbor terrorist or countries that are hostile towards us.

I also like

Neither a wise nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him.

Dwight Eisenhower

Edited by moderateamericain

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John Edwards, 55, ex-US presidential candidate, explains why he had an extramarital affair:

"I went from being a senator, a young senator to being considered for vice president, running for president, being a vice presidential candidate and becoming a national public figure. All of which fed a self-focus, an egotism, a narcissism that leads you to believe that you can do whatever you want. You're invincible. And there will be no consequences."
ABC News

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John Edwards, 55, ex-US presidential candidate, explains why he had an extramarital affair: ABC News

You know, if I ever had an affair I don't think I could blame it anything other than my happy go lucky penis, sex drive and my lack of respect and maturity.

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John McCain, 71, Republican candidate for President, on Joe Biden, 65, the Democrats' choice for VP candidate:

"I know that Joe will campaign well for Senator Obama, and so I think he's going to be very formidable," Senator McCain told CBS News in an interview from his Arizona ranch.

"Obviously, Joe and I have been on different philosophical sides, but ... I consider him a good friend and good man," he said.

While Senator Biden, 65, lost no time in attacking 71-year-old Senator McCain at his public unveiling alongside Senator Obama at an event in Illinois, the Republican said "I think he's a good selection".

"Joe and I have been friends for many, many years, and we know each other very well."

ABC - Australian News Edited by August1991

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Vaclav Havel, 71, author and ex-President of Czechoslovakia and of the Czech Republic:

"I think that a certain Russian problem has existed for many centuries - Russia does not know exactly where it begins and ends. Though it is the world's largest country, it has still a feeling that it is quite small and that its tiny neighbours around threaten it," said Havel, playwright, thinker and former leading dissident, who was Czechoslovak president in 1989-92 and Czech president in 1993-2003.
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Geraldine Ferraro, 73, failed US vice-presidential candidate:

"It’s going to be a very interesting campaign. I must say that several months ago I said that it would be great if there was a woman on the ticket — that I felt that John McCain would have to pick someone, especially if Hillary was the nominee. But without Hillary being the nominee it’s really quite equally as important because people are looking for a smart campaign and I think this might do it.

"There are a lot of women who are disaffected by how Hillary was treated by the media, by how she was treated by the Obama campaign, by how she was treated by the Democratic National Committee — [Democratic party chairman] Howard Dean not speaking up when sexism raised its ugly head in the media. They’ll be looking to see what happens now."

Fox Edited by August1991

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Sarah Palin, 44, Republican candidate for Vice-President:

"I've learned quickly, these past few days, that if you're not a member in good standing of the Washington elite, then some in the media consider a candidate unqualified for that reason alone," she says in prepared remarks. "But here's a little news flash for all those reporters and commentators: I'm not going to Washington to seek their good opinion -- I'm going to Washington to serve the people of this country."
CTV

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Stephen Harper, 49, PM of Canada when asked what kind of vegetable he would be:

"I have never been asked that question before, and I have a feeling I can't win by answering it," he said.

Harper turned to ponder his options amid the backdrop of produce stacked behind him, scanning the boxes of cucumbers, carrots and tomatoes, then opted to amend the scope of the question with his reply.

"I would choose, if I had to, instead to be a fruit," Harper said with a cheeky smile, drawing laughter from the audience. "Just what I am — sweet and colourful."

CBC

Harper's a fruit?

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Jacques Brassard, 68, PQ deputy and minister from Lac St-Jean during 25 years:

« Le Bloc québécois est devenu en quelque sorte le clone du NPD. La souveraineté a été plus ou moins mise en veilleuse. On n’en parle plus. Les circonstances ne s’y prêtent pas. Mais il reste que c’était cela la raison d’être du Bloc. Mais cela ne fait plus partie de leur discours. Ils ont adopté carrément un discours de gauche avec tous les thèmes habituels de la gauche. Je regrette, mais moi ça ne me convient pas. Je ne me reconnais pas dans ce parti », a lancé M. Brassard dans une entrevue téléphonique.
Cyberpresse

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Stephen Harper:

When I look back to where we were 20 years ago in politics, the basic precept of market economy and fiscal responsibility, which are today accepted, were not accepted 20 years ago. What I find amazing in this election, is that the Liberal party, which basically embraced [those principles] in the last decade, has now abandoned them and moved to the NDP position. It's a mystery to me.

....

Grand blueprints that have been done on the blackboard, endorsed by experts with no practical experience in the economy or society, are disastrous. At a time when I shifted my party away from that kind of thinking, the leader of the Opposition has shifted his party toward it. So much the better for us.

NP Edited by August1991

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I would disagree with Harper about grand blueprints though, seeing as this interweb thingee we use for arguing qualifies as one of those blueprints.

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I would disagree with Harper about grand blueprints though, seeing as this interweb thingee we use for arguing qualifies as one of those blueprints.
Of all examples, that's the most ludicrous. The Internet has absolutely no blueprint. The Internet is like the English language. No one knows what anyone is going to use it for and there ain't even any set rule of grammar.

In central Moscow, the cacophonous federal State Duma is now in the same building once occupied by Gosplan. Gone is the pretense of any structured blueprint or plan.

As I have often said, government bureaucrats cannot pick winners. Markets, entre autres, are designed to manage change. Organizations (corporations) subject to market forces must cope with change. Government bureaucrats aim to provide "stability".

----

In the quote above, Harper is being partisan (he's criticizing Dion and his Green Plan) but I think Harper is also engaging in a bit of self-criticism. For a guy his age and in his position, Harper seems to have learned that, while tempting, governments should not try to plan every detail. Government is a seductive beast: one has the impression that it can solve our problems when in fact it can't.

Edited by August1991

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Dion campaigning in NL today.

“Many times Mr. Harper and Mr. Layton worked together … Mr. Layton was beside him in 2006 to go to an election. He said to Canadians, to Liberals, at that time: ‘Lend me your vote.’ OK, he gave to Canada Stephen Harper.

“I know that this time Canadians will say to Mr. Layton, “Well, we want our vote back, with interest.”

http://www.winnipegsun.com/canadavotes/new...15/6770516.html

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Stephen Harper:

« Historiquement, les nationalistes étaient la vraie base du Parti conservateur au Québec. Ceux et celles qui appuient un gouvernement centralisateur très fort, ce sont des libéraux. Ceux qui veulent l’indépendance du Québec appuient le Bloc et le Parti québécois au niveau provincial. Mais ceux et celles qui veulent avoir un Québec fort, un Québec qui tient très fort à son identité, mais en même temps qui garde sa place importante au Canada sont historiquement des conservateurs », a affirmé le premier ministre.
La Presse

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