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Canada Day: Another good reason to despise liberals


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Guest Peeves

http://www.rogerogreen.com/2012/02/07/d-is-for-dominion/

Nothing wrong with reminiscing, and some things today are worse not better. The Dominion may be gone post '82, but the people are the founders.

Apparently, dominion status end in 1982 “when the British and Canadian parliaments passed parallel acts – the Canada Act, 1982 ([uK] 1982, c.11) in London, and the Constitution Act 1982 in Ottawa. Thereafter, the United Kingdom was formally absolved of any remaining responsibility for, or jurisdiction over, Canada; and Canada became responsible for her own destiny. In a formal ceremony on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, the Queen signed both acts into law on April 17, 1982.”

But in that period between 1867 and 1982, Canada declared war on its own, in 1939.* And subsequent to 1982, “the federal government continues to produce publications and educational materials that specify the currency of these official titles.” So I’m still not 100% clear I understand all of this correctly. (The picture, BTW, is from a 1945 Dominion of Canada $50 Eighth Victory Loan War Bond.)

*And Korea, Gulf War.

So much for those claiming Canada to be a country of peace keepers.

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Apparently, dominion status end in 1982 when the British and Canadian parliaments passed parallel acts the Canada Act, 1982 ([uK] 1982, c.11) in London, and the Constitution Act 1982 in Ottawa.

The author of that piece either never heard of or forgot about the Balfour Declaration of 1926 and the subsequent Statute of Westminster 1931. Nothing in either explicitly stated that the term "Dominion", as it was used specifically within the British Empire (i.e. a largely self-governing colony of the UK), was thereafter defunct. But, because they elevated the Dominions to a status equal with the UK, it was felt no longer appropriate to use the term "Dominion" for what were the Dominions (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the Irish Free State, and Newfoundland), since it did imply a level of subservience to Britain. The term therefore fell out of diplomatic use and was replaced by the word "realm" in the new British Commonwealth over the years following 1931.

The law, however, was slow to catch up. In 1952, though British and Canadian laws both still titled the monarch of the UK and Canada, respectively, as "Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas Queen, Defender of the Faith", the British proclamation of the Queen's accession called her "Queen of this Realm, and of Her other Realms and Territories" (while Canada's proclamation stuck to the letter of the law, despite the anachronistic discrepancies). It was only in 1953 that the Commonwealth Realms of the day each passed new royal titles acts, each giving the Queen the title "Queen of the United Kingdom, [Country] and her other realms and territories, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith" (the United Kingdom obviously in its royal title omitting the extra country name).

Long story short: Canada's Dominion status ended long before 1982.

[ed.: c/e]

Edited by g_bambino
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The problem with Canada Day as I see it are all the hypocrites. People run around in their red and white clothes with their faces painted smashed off their ass drunk and celebrating. Meanwhile, less than 60% of eligible voters bothered to turn out to the polls. If Canadians really were proud to be Canadians, they would show a modicum of pride in their country and vote. They would fulfil their civic responsibilities and actually understand their government and what's going on. I felt like going down to the celebration and interviewing some of these folks that were the most ridiculously over-the-top about their nationalism. I wanted to ask the guy whose face was completely covered in red and white paint as he sported a Canada flag as a cape questions about our government and our country. Nothing too hard. Things like who is our head of state. What type of government do we have. How many seats are in the House of Commons. Those kinds of questions. I bet the answers would have been embarrassing. Blind, empty patriotism is all Canada Day is about and it's disgusting.

Edited by cybercoma
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Meanwhile, less than 60% of eligible voters bothered to turn out to the polls. If Canadians really were proud to be Canadians, they would show a modicum of pride in their country and vote.

To be fair, some of the 60% do vote...just not in Canadian elections but in elections held in their mother country.

Filled with hope, Libyan-Canadians cast ballots in Ottawa for their home country’s historic election

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Filled+with+hope+Libyan+Canadians+cast+ballots+Ottawa+their+home+country+historic+election/6878928/story.html

Heck, a Canadian born Quebecer was elected to France's parliament to represent French citizens living in other countries.

Axelle Lemaire: Canadian wins bid for French parliament seat - in London

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Axelle+Lemaire+Canadian+wins+French+parliament+seat+London/6813609/story.html

One has to admire those answering the call of civic duty.

:D

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The problem with Canada Day as I see it are all the hypocrites. People run around in their red and white clothes with their faces painted smashed off their ass drunk and celebrating. Meanwhile, less than 60% of eligible voters bothered to turn out to the polls. If Canadians really were proud to be Canadians, they would show a modicum of pride in their country and vote. They would fulfil their civic responsibilities and actually understand their government and what's going on. I felt like going down to the celebration and interviewing some of these folks that were the most ridiculously over-the-top about their nationalism. I wanted to ask the guy whose face was completely covered in red and white paint as he sported a Canada flag as a cape questions about our government and our country. Nothing too hard. Things like who is our head of state. What type of government do we have. How many seats are in the House of Commons. Those kinds of questions. I bet the answers would have been embarrassing. Blind, empty patriotism is all Canada Day is about and it's disgusting.

re's

I sympathize with this, and the lack of engagement in our electorate frustrates me as well.

However, not every person running around drunk on Canada Day stays home when there's an election. That sort of sweeping generalization doesn't do anything but provide you with a convenient excuse to dismiss the young people you apparently despise.

There's no correlation between face-painting and voter turnout.

Edited by na85
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re's

I sympathize with this, and the lack of engagement in our electorate frustrates me as well.

However, not every person running around drunk on Canada Day stays home when there's an election. That sort of sweeping generalization doesn't do anything but provide you with a convenient excuse to dismiss the young people you apparently despise.

There's no correlation between face-painting and voter turnout.

How do you know I was talking about a young person? The guy I saw was probably in his 30s or early 40s.

That aside, there's definitely a correlation between youth and drinking and partying (Canada Day is one of those excuses to drink and party). There's also a correlation between youth and low voter turnout. I don't think I'm making an unsupported claim here. Perhaps the ultra-patriotic youth on Canada Day are going out and voting, but I highly doubt it. Youth generally vote in lower numbers.

And it's not just youth that can be showing this kind of nationalism even though they have no sense civic responsibility. People in general are completely ignorant of our government and country. I just think that interviewing people in general that are being over-the-top patriotic on Canada Day to see if they have over-the-top knowledge about the country would be an interesting contrast.

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Blind, empty patriotism is all Canada Day is about and it's disgusting.

I disagree with this, actually. I grew up in Ottawa and make it back for Canada Day most years (not the last two). Much of the appeal for me has to do with the range of interesting cultural activities that are available for free downtown. When I went two years ago, I saw 30s-style Gypsy jazz and a solo indie violinist/singer who accompanies himself with looping devices. I ate Indian curry as well as haggis. Other times I've enjoyed Greek dancing, avant-garde Swedish jazz, etc. The National Gallery is always free on Canada Day as well.

(As such, btw, Canada Day is distinct from the 4th of July celebrations I've been exposed to.)

(Also, I'm still unclear on why the OP thinks the change to Canada Day from Dominion Day was a bad thing in any way.)

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The multiculturalism is another thing that drives me nuts about Canada Day. Can having no culture at all be a culture? These Canada Day celebrations embrace myriad cultural traditions of other nationalities. It should be about poutine, hockey, beavers, and our First Nations. Multiculturalism should be in there, but it shouldn't be the key feature imo.

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The multiculturalism is another thing that drives me nuts about Canada Day. Can having no culture at all be a culture? These Canada Day celebrations embrace myriad cultural traditions of other nationalities. It should be about poutine, hockey, beavers, and our First Nations. Multiculturalism should be in there, but it shouldn't be the key feature imo.

Are you joking? I can't tell. It's a day to celebrate a (multicultural) country, not a day to celebrate a culture.

Edit: In any case, my only point was that there is or can be more to Canada Day than "blind, empty patriotism".

Edited by Evening Star
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Are you joking? I can't tell. It's a day to celebrate a (multicultural) country, not a day to celebrate a culture.

I think I would be more likely to object to it if the point of Canada Day was to celebrate some ostensible national culture, actually.

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But you enjoy celebrating other people's cultures on Canada Day because our nation embraces them? Dance foreigners! Dance! Entertain me with your unique and interesting culture! It's all rather condescending, I find.

Edited by cybercoma
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One has to admire those answering the call of civic duty.

Contrast with me; I've never voted in a Canadian election, only that of my mother country.
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But you enjoy celebrating other people's cultures on Canada Day because our nation embraces them? Dance foreigners! Dance! Entertain me with your unique and interesting culture! It's all rather condescending, I find.

They are not foreigners! They are Canadians!

Edit: As a Canadian-born Indo-Canadian, I'm not even sure what I'm supposed to see as 'my Canadian culture' vs 'other people's cultures' in this case. Am I supposed to consider poutine less foreign than curry? Is haggis non-Canadian? The Queen is still our head of state, right? Is a classically-trained violinist who plays with electronics foreign culture? Would it be less condescending if I were watching traditional aboriginal dances as opposed to Greek dances? And I was looking at the work of Canadian painters at the Natl Gallery btw.

Btw, I've never seen a beaver in its natural habitat, despite living in Canada for all but three years of my life.

Edited by Evening Star
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You illustrate my point about how Canadians don't even understand or have a culture and the cultural confusion of Canada Day perfectly.

This is a consequence of leftist policies that are "post-nationalistic" and "post-patriotism. In other words, this ambiguously-defined national identity is what you get with "multiculturalism". When all else fails, however, the Canadian left can always define itself as "not American".

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This is a consequence of leftist policies that are "post-nationalistic" and "post-patriotism. In other words, this ambiguously-defined national identity is what you get with "multiculturalism". When all else fails, however, the Canadian left can always define itself as "not American".

Agreed...and this was by design. Trudeau sacrificed Canadian identity on the alter of "multiculturalism" for narrow political purposes. The resulting vacuum was/is filled with reflexive contrast to the American hegemon.

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You illustrate my point about how Canadians don't even understand or have a culture and the cultural confusion of Canada Day perfectly.

Perhaps but I don't see this as a problem. A day to celebrate a country does not need to be a day to celebrate a culture per se. (Do you really think Canada Day would be less blindly patriotic if it really were all about "poutine, hockey, and beavers"?)

Also, I don't think you've demonstrated how what I describe is either blind patriotism or blatant condescension.

Edited by Evening Star
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