Jump to content
Political Discussion Forums
Bonam

World's First Commercial Nuclear Battery

Recommended Posts

http://www.gizmag.co...-battery/23720/

http://www.citylabs.net/

I've been wondering for a while when we'd get commercial tritium batteries, and looks like some came on the market just this year. Exciting news, batteries that can last for decades (without recharge), supplying continuous power. Nuclear batteries such as this can have energy densities up to ~1 million times greater than chemical batteries.

With a regulatory approval precedent set for nuclear batteries, hopefully higher power versions will be developed and introduced. The applications are endless: medical implants, MEMS, spacecraft, and as higher power versions become developed, consumer electronics, just to name a few. Imagine a cell phone or laptop that never needs to be recharged.

Edited by Bonam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the world would still be a better place with faster horses, looser women and an honest 4 finger lid.

Edited by eyeball

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.gizmag.co...-battery/23720/

http://www.citylabs.net/

I've been wondering for a while when we'd get commercial tritium batteries, and looks like some came on the market just this year. Exciting news, batteries that can last for decades (without recharge), supplying continuous power. Nuclear batteries such as this can have energy densities up to ~1 million times greater than chemical batteries.

With a regulatory approval precedent set for nuclear batteries, hopefully higher power versions will be developed and introduced. The applications are endless: medical implants, MEMS, spacecraft, and as higher power versions become developed, consumer electronics, just to name a few. Imagine a cell phone or laptop that never needs to be recharged.

Looks like they still need some development, Bonam The amp hrs so far aren't that impressive. Might keep CMOS memory active in a cell phone but that's about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like they still need some development, Bonam

Oh, for sure. Everything has to begin with a first step, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ya it's talking about powering "microelectronics" for 20 years, not things like iPhones and laptops that use a lot of juice. Sure would be nice thought if I could get a 1-year charge out of a battery for those things. Heck I'll very happily take a month even.

a. what are the safety concerns for this? ie: radioactivity exposure (esp. if using something like a cellphone), damage exposure, & environmental in disposing of a depleted battery? Does it give off that much radioactivity?

b. how much would something like this cost to a consumer?

Edited by Moonlight Graham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this is more interesting:

http://eetimes.com/electronics-news/4182617/Silicon-air-battery-touts-unlimited-shelf-life

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology scientists have developed an environmentally friendly silicon-air battery that can supply non-stop power for thousands of hours without needing to be replaced.

Created from oxygen and silicon—the second most plentiful element in the earth's crust—such batteries would be lightweight, have an unlimited shelf life, and have a high tolerance for both humid and extremely dry conditions. Potential uses include medical applications such as for powering diabetic pumps or hearing aids; sensors; and microelectronics structured from silicon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a. what are the safety concerns for this? ie: radioactivity exposure (esp. if using something like a cellphone), damage exposure, & environmental in disposing of a depleted battery? Does it give off that much radioactivity?

b. how much would something like this cost to a consumer?

The radiation point is a good one. If they put that nuclear radioactive icon on the battery what exactly is it giving off?

And I think the cost will be high obviously at the start. Depending how small they can get, possibly on a nano scale then you can power a whole fleet of MEMS if need be.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microelectromechanical_systems

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding radiation concerns: Tritium is a pure beta emitter. Betas emission is just electrons, which can be completely stopped by a thin layer of metal foil. No radiation should be emitted on the outside of the battery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...