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The Path to Provincehood


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Isn't the current arrangement the best of both world's for Canada's far-north and the territories don't even wish to be promoted to provincehood?

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  • 6 years later...

Why isn't anyone pushing for the constitution to be amended to make Yukon, Nunavut and NWT provinces? I want them to be provinces already! What's taking so long! I'm tired of Canada having 10 provinces and three territories. It sounds so ancient. I want to say Canada has 13 provinces!! Who do I need to talk to? What should the name of NWT be changed to when it becomes a province?

Edited by OttawaNow
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On 3/6/2013 at 11:51 PM, shortlived said:

What makes you think that?

Lots of natives up there, why would they want to be raped by a province? Or is that to oppose being raped by the federal govt.

The treaties are with the federal govt. why would they want to have to deal with a new player?

So are you saying that if the territories became provinces, then the native tribes would no longer have control of their land? Or you are saying they will have to deal with a provincial government (new player) as well as dealing with the federal government?

Edited by OttawaNow
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On 3/8/2013 at 3:56 PM, g_bambino said:

They are with the federal Crown. Executive government is constitutionally vested in the Crown.

So are you saying that the Crown would have to make the Canadian territories into provinces? By Crown, do you mean England would have to be involved? Who or what is Canada's Crown?

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The major difference between a Canadian province and a territory is that provinces receive their power and authority from the Constitution Act, 1867(formerly called the British North America Act, 1867), whereas territorial governments have powers delegated to them by the Parliament of Canada. The powers flowing from the Constitution Act are divided between the Government of Canada (the federal government) and the provincial governments to exercise exclusively. A change to the division of powers between the federal government and the provinces requires a constitutional amendment, whereas a similar change affecting the territories can be performed unilaterally by the Parliament of Canada or government.

Once the procedure for the adoption of the amendment is followed successfully, the amendment is formalized as a proclamation of the Governor General in Council. Officially, therefore, the Constitution is amended by Proclamation, and the issue of the Proclamation requires prior approval by resolutions of the House of Commons, the Senate, and the necessary number of provincial legislative assemblies.

The following matters are reserved to the s. 38 procedure, by virtue of s. 42:

(a) the principle of proportionate representation of the provinces in the House of Commons prescribed by the Constitution of Canada;
(b) the powers of the Senate and the method of selecting Senators;
(c) the number of members by which a province is entitled to be represented in the Senate and the residence qualifications of Senators;
(d) subject to paragraph 41(d), the Supreme Court of Canada;
(e) the extension of existing provinces into the territories; and
(f) the establishment of new provinces.
 

 

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An amendment to the Constitution officially changed the name of Newfoundland to Newfoundland and Labrador on December 6, 2001. The official abbreviations are: Newfoundland Nfld.

https://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/040006/f2/040006-02-e.pdf

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-s-name-change-now-official-1.279040

The ‘Newfoundland and Labrador’ naming fiasco

https://theindependent.ca/2011/04/22/the-‘newfoundland-and-labrador’-naming-fiasco/

https://theindependent.ca/2011/05/06/the-‘newfoundland-and-labrador’-naming-fiasco-–-part-2-2/

Newfoundland and Labrador

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newfoundland_and_Labrador

Population:

Labrador - 30,000

Newfoundland - 500,000

I would prefer for Newfoundland and Labrador to be two separate provinces.

Edited by OttawaNow
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  • 2 months later...
On 11/20/2019 at 6:56 AM, Cannucklehead said:

The major difference between a Canadian province and a territory is that provinces receive their power and authority from the Constitution Act, 1867(formerly called the British North America Act, 1867), whereas territorial governments have powers delegated to them by the Parliament of Canada. The powers flowing from the Constitution Act are divided between the Government of Canada (the federal government) and the provincial governments to exercise exclusively. A change to the division of powers between the federal government and the provinces requires a constitutional amendment, whereas a similar change affecting the territories can be performed unilaterally by the Parliament of Canada or government.

Once the procedure for the adoption of the amendment is followed successfully, the amendment is formalized as a proclamation of the Governor General in Council. Officially, therefore, the Constitution is amended by Proclamation, and the issue of the Proclamation requires prior approval by resolutions of the House of Commons, the Senate, and the necessary number of provincial legislative assemblies.

The following matters are reserved to the s. 38 procedure, by virtue of s. 42:

(a) the principle of proportionate representation of the provinces in the House of Commons prescribed by the Constitution of Canada;
(b) the powers of the Senate and the method of selecting Senators;
(c) the number of members by which a province is entitled to be represented in the Senate and the residence qualifications of Senators;
(d) subject to paragraph 41(d), the Supreme Court of Canada;
(e) the extension of existing provinces into the territories; and
(f) the establishment of new provinces.
 

 

Thank you.

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