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Ontario Liberals Sneaky Cuts to Diabetics

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More sneaky stuff from the Ontario Liberals, now they are rationing type 2 diabetics without notification or publicity.

This is just another form of rationing seniors' health care.

http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/sunnews/straighttalk/archives/2013/08/20130814-073258.html

Ontario's health ministry, responsible for the eHealth and Ornge scandals which cost taxpayers well over $1 billion, says it's found a way to save up to $25 million annually.

Without telling 160,000 Type 2 diabetics who are mainly seniors, it's drastically reduced funding for the test strips they use to monitor their blood glucose levels.

Spokesmen for Health Minister Deb Matthews say the ministry consulted with the Canadian Diabetes Association in developing the policy, based on research diabetic patients who can control their condition without taking insulin, don't need to test themselves as often as they typically do.

So, as of Aug. 1, they're restricted to 200 to 400 strips annually - which cost about 75¢ each to produce and are paid for by Ontario's Drug Benefit Plan - depending on the risk they face of hypoglycemia.

(Diabetics needing insulin will be covered for up to 3,000 strips annually.)

Prior to this new policy, patients consulted with their own doctors and pharmacists on how often they needed to test themselves, with no set limit on the number of strips they could use.

So the news came as a shock to diabetic patients like 68-year-old Wayne Beatty, who has been successfully managing his diabetes through diet and exercise for 15 years, without taking insulin, and tests himself four to six times daily.

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Spokesmen for Health Minister Deb Matthews say the ministry consulted with the Canadian Diabetes Association in developing the policy, based on research diabetic patients who can control their condition without taking insulin, don't need to test themselves as often as they typically do.

I don't see the big deal.

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I'm not sure I buy into that. I'm a type 2 and test myself regularly along with seeing a dietician etc. It is a big deal for those who have to check themselves. Again, I see it as just another form of rationing health care to save money.

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I'm not sure I buy into that. I'm a type 2 and test myself regularly along with seeing a dietician etc. It is a big deal for those who have to check themselves. Again, I see it as just another form of rationing health care to save money.

How often is regularly?

And of course this is to save money.

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I, too, am someone who has Di 2 for several years, I know my body so well that I only check my blood maybe twice a day to keep my sugar levels at a safe level. It can be done but one has to really watch the food one eats and know which foods rises sugar levels too fast and too high. Di 2 can be cured by losing enough weight so the body can use up the excessive sugar that causes Di2. My problem was my thyroid went and I started to put on the weight and for me its been a tough time trying to get those levels back. Anyway, those tabs for checking one blood are expensives and I can understand why the gov't is trying to cut cost.

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I'm a type 2 and test myself regularly along with seeing a dietician etc. It is a big deal for those who have to check themselves.

And it's not for people with type 1?

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If you type 2's watch your diets and you know, get up an move about every now and again, you'll reduce your dependence on metformin/glumeza/landis and not have to test as often as a result.

Scribblet, if the CPC had done this you'd be yelling their praises from the rooftops.

Edited by Shakeyhands

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If you type 2's watch your diets and you know, get up an move about every now and again, you'll reduce your dependence on metformin/glumeza/landis and not have to test as often as a result.

Scribblet, if the CPC had done this you'd be yelling their praises from the rooftops.

Not likely, and it's the sneakiness that's a big problem. Cuts without announcements. Some people need more than others - but hey - lets give free needles to addicts but not to diabetics.

I do watch my diet and don't test as often as some type 2s do and I don't take meds. I'm not really affected by this but I know people who are and have to check more often.

bambino: My understanding is it does not affect type 1s.

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Not likely, and it's the sneakiness that's a big problem. Cuts without announcements. Some people need more than others - but hey - lets give free needles to addicts but not to diabetics.

If you're suggesting that MORE of our health-care costs should be covered...I agree.

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If you type 2's watch your diets and you know, get up an move about every now and again, you'll reduce your dependence on metformin/glumeza/landis and not have to test as often as a result.

Scribblet, if the CPC had done this you'd be yelling their praises from the rooftops.

Thanks, Dr. Shakey. It's good to know there's a one-size-fits-all solution for diabetics that people just haven't been able to figure out.

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Thanks, Dr. Shakey. It's good to know there's a one-size-fits-all solution for diabetics that people just haven't been able to figure out.

No problem, probably should have mentiond that I am T2 as well, managed by diet and excercise. Typically between 5 and 8...no meds.

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It runs in my family, my dad had it and it did not kill him directly it helped and now my mother @85 now has it. She was at 30 we rushed her in and now she has been running around 7-9 after the insulin and new diet. I check all the time because of it being in the family and I run around 5 -6.

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Get used to it.

With the aging population and the resulting intense pressure on our health care system- far more than there is now- every province will be delisting services in coming years.

For the record, these supplies are not covered in Alberta under general govt plans.

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Get used to it.

With the aging population and the resulting intense pressure on our health care system- far more than there is now- every province will be delisting services in coming years.

For the record, these supplies are not covered in Alberta under general govt plans.

All the more reason a 2-tier system is essential.

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How would that help?

The system could actually raise some private funds and the model would no longer as unsustainable.

Why shouldn't people be able to pay for services the public system can't offer?

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The system could actually raise some private funds and the model would no longer as unsustainable.

Why shouldn't people be able to pay for services the public system can't offer?

They can, it's only a short drive south.

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The system could actually raise some private funds and the model would no longer as unsustainable.

Why shouldn't people be able to pay for services the public system can't offer?

You do understand that it's still all coming from the same pot, right?

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You do understand that it's still all coming from the same pot, right?

If you mean taxpayers pockets into a public purse, then no it is not

Every province has different services covered in differing amounts right now.

The two tier public/private system has been thriving in Canada for half a century or more.

What will change in coming years is the ratio of the two as the demographics become overwhelming is that fewer services will be offered from the public purse, and those same services will be covered out of private and/or employer plans. For the elderly, it will be private coverage if they have any money, public subsidy if they don't.

There is no way any province can afford to not delist some services, or at least make them income dependent.

I wonder if Ontario picked diabetic supplies for Type 2 diabetics because it is for many people a lifestyle disease.

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Public or private, there's only one group paying for everything in the end.

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