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I just spent a few hours in Manhatten, Queens (driving to JFK) and because I was lost, the Bronx.

I like New York. The view from the Whitestone Bridge or Throgs Neck (did both, $7.50 - ugh) exists nowhere else on this planet. (For those curious of geology, because of glaciers and bedrock, the really tall buildings are at the low end of Manhatten or in midtown )

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Manhatten below 60th street (lotsa tourists) is one thing, but New York City is something else. NYC is divided on ethnic lines. Latinos in one area, blacks in another. Because of my GPS error, I wound up in "The Cloisters" - a white, first world enclave.

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To me, New York is 1920s Berlin whereas Montreal is Vienna or Lvov in the 1890s.

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New York rocks. It was once the capital of the U.S. until that was traded away in a typical political deal bad for New York. The city thrived anyway and has gone on to become the capital of the world.

Edited by jbg
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  • 1 month later...

New York rocks. It was once the capital of the U.S. until that was traded away in a typical political deal bad for New York. The city thrived anyway and has gone on to become the capital of the world.

Rocks?

To me, the question is whether New York City is "sustainable" - to use a modern term. IOW, in 2114 - one hundred years from now, will New York City still "rock", to use your term.

Lvov 1914 compared to Lvov 2014? It sadly wasn't sustainable - and while its architecture is now attractive, Lvov doesn't.rock as it did 100 years ago.

Edited by August1991
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Rocks?

To me, the question is whether New York City is "sustainable" - to use a modern term. IOW, in 2114 - one hundred years from now, will New York City still "rock", to use your term.

Lvov 1914 compared to Lvov 2014? It sadly wasn't sustainable - and while its architecture is now attractive, Lvov doesn't.rock as it did 100 years ago.

Lvov (or Lemberg, or Lwow, or Lviv, whatever of its many names and nationalities you use) was never the New York City of Europe. While it had many ethnicities they have historically hated each other. The city changed national hands about 4 or 5 times within 100 years and the surrounding countries have concentrated more on fighting than progressing the region.

New York City's history is quite the opposite. In fact, New York City has materially revived from its 1970's-era funk.

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Lvov (or Lemberg, or Lwow, or Lviv, whatever of its many names and nationalities you use) was never the New York City of Europe.

But in a sense, Lvov was the 19th century version of 21st century New York City: a multilingual, multicultural metropolis. Or maybe Miami is a better American example.

The question is whether such cities are sustainable. Lvov apparently wasn't, sadly.

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But in a sense, Lvov was the 19th century version of 21st century New York City: a multilingual, multicultural metropolis. Or maybe Miami is a better American example.

The question is whether such cities are sustainable. Lvov apparently wasn't, sadly.

At least Lemberg, Lwow, Lvov Lviv was near the intersection of borders with greedy rulers, royal or otherwise. New York City doesn't have that peril. Edited by jbg
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Isn't New York going to be underwater soon?

Not likely.

The closest we came to that was in 1821 (yes you read right). An unnamed hurricane took a direct hit on NYC and the East and Hudson Rivers merged from Bowling Green (the southernn tip) to Canal Street, which is about 1 3/4 kms. north. Even Irene, in 2011 which may have been the next direct hitter (some controversy over whether it was still a hurricane and where it's direct hit was), didn't come close. Sandy threw up a huge storm surge but even that didn't merge the rivers.

Nice try for the climate alarmists.

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Pretty sure that regardless of any possible sea level rise, New York will raise the needed funds to build adequate barriers to prevent it from being "underwater".

At the rate the US government gets anything done, they better get started pretty soon. So should the rest of us

.http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/17/climate-change-antarctica-glaciers-melting-global-warming-nasa

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2635170/Antarctic-ice-losses-doubled-159-GIGATONNES-thats-430-000-Empire-State-Buildings-year-satellite-reveals.html

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Pretty sure that regardless of any possible sea level rise, New York will raise the needed funds to build adequate barriers to prevent it from being "underwater".

Like in New Orleans and Army Corp of Engineers?

Well, if NYC wants to, lets hope they hire the dutch.....or the Italians. They appear to know what they are doing

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They have a huge head start tho.

In as much of the Netherlands is below sea level already, yes, but their systems will all have to be raised to accommodate higher levels and new systems to protect areas that weren't threatened before. Some of the worlds largest cities are at near sea level already.

Coastal counties in the US have 39 % of the country's population and generate nearly half its GDP.

Edited by Wilber
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Oh, it's coming, not immediately but it's coming.

The thread is supposed to be about NYC, not global warming.

My point was only that NYC has experienced issues with its rivers before and it seems to still be doing quite well.

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At least Lemberg, Lwow, Lvov Lviv was near the intersection of borders with greedy rulers, royal or otherwise. New York City doesn't have that peril.

Also Lemberg, Lwow, Lvov Lviv never approached being even a national, much less a world capital. As an aside, I am reading a book about Robert E. Lee. When Washington DC was almost occupied by rebel forced during the Civil War, it was New York City that was slated to become the temporary repository of government. In fact, many documents and most removable property was taken to New York for just such an event, and safekeeping.
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