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This week in Islam

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3 hours ago, scribblet said:

Some common sense from Amsterdam and they are right, no need for loudspeaker to remind people to pray, there's an app for that.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/europe/amsterdam-refuses-mosque-s-request-for-loudspeaker-call-to-prayer-1.4067260

 

Now this is the best and funniest thing I've heard in a long time lol So true!

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On 4/30/2020 at 10:01 PM, Goddess said:

these are usually the last words victims of Islamic terrorism hear, which is unsettling to many.

Or "being a victim of terrorism is unsettling to many". I'd like to see some unbiased data on how many PTSD sufferers have a problem with hearing the adhan. Not all traumatic experiences are triggered by just anything somehow related to the traumatic environment.

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On 5/2/2020 at 10:57 AM, Marocc said:

They're probably not holding services.

They usually ring the bells on the hour - 1 ring for 1 pm, 2 rings for 2 pm, etc.

They are not doing it right now.  It has nothing to do with whether services are being held or not.

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8 hours ago, Marocc said:

Or "being a victim of terrorism is unsettling to many". I'd like to see some unbiased data on how many PTSD sufferers have a problem with hearing the adhan.

I don't imagine you care much about the people in the world who suffer from PTSD because of Islamic terrorism.  There was a news story awhile back about a woman who had been sold as a sex slave by ISIS, managed to escape and get to Canada - where she ran into one of her former "owners" who had raped her repeatedly - walking the streets freely.  Again, likely that you don't give a rip about that kind of thing, as you appear to agree with much of ISIS' basic teachings, and also seem to not even understand the basics of PTSD:

Quote

Not all traumatic experiences are triggered by just anything somehow related to the traumatic environment.

 

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5 hours ago, Goddess said:

They usually ring the bells on the hour - 1 ring for 1 pm, 2 rings for 2 pm, etc.

Bell chimes? I thought you said something about Sunday service. The clock is a whole different story. Well.. You do have a phone, don't you.

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14 minutes ago, Marocc said:

Bell chimes? I thought you said something about Sunday service. The clock is a whole different story. Well.. You do have a phone, don't you.

Not long ago that would have been a watch...

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18 minutes ago, Marocc said:

Bell chimes? I thought you said something about Sunday service. The clock is a whole different story. Well.. You do have a phone, don't you.

Yes, the same as Muslims don't need the call to prayer to know what times to pray.  They have phones, watches and apps for that.

And I have already outlined the reasons why the Islamic call to prayer is very different than church bells chiming the hour.

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5 minutes ago, Goddess said:

Yes, the same as Muslims don't need the call to prayer to know what times to pray. 

But the Adhan is only 5 times a day. Not every hour.

6 minutes ago, Goddess said:

And I have already outlined the reasons why the Islamic call to prayer is very different than church bells chiming the hour.

It must've been one of those long posts of yours I skipped. I know you can't discuss it so I don't see a reason to spend time readying your lengthy copy pastes and ignorant talk.

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4 minutes ago, Marocc said:

 

It must've been one of those long posts of yours I skipped. I know you can't discuss it so I don't see a reason to spend time readying your lengthy copy pastes and ignorant talk.

Why accuse me of "can't discuss it" when you just said you didn't read my post where I DID actually discuss it? 

You don't read them because I copy & paste?  Why not?  We are supposed to add link and quotes to our posts, some topics have been deleted here because they DON'T contain enough information.

How do you know it was nothing but "ignorant talk" when you didn't read it?

Go away now, troll.

Edited by Goddess
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Anywhere there was a mosque with a call to prayer five times a day property values would drop. It would be irritating to hear someone calling out in a foreign language for five minutes or more over a loudspeaker half a dozen times a day. Bell chimes last seconds. And are less intrusive and foreign.

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20 minutes ago, Argus said:

property values would drop

Good.

20 minutes ago, Argus said:

It would be irritating to hear someone calling out in a foreign language for five minutes

Too bad.

21 minutes ago, Argus said:

five minutes

I don't think it lasts that long, though I suppose it may vary. I'm guessing 2 minutes.

22 minutes ago, Argus said:

half a dozen

5.

22 minutes ago, Argus said:

Bell chimes last seconds.

But there are many. And - you don't need a church clock to chime the time.

Actually, I don't even know what your trouble is. You have too much time - all of you - to talk empty talk. Do you realize that you are going to die one day?

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When did anyone last hear church bells, I haven't heard any in years.  You won't hear Salvation Army bells at Christmas either because that's not allowed.  There are already a couple of petitions against this intrusion, not to mention freedom 'from' religion petitions.  

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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/30/world/africa/sudan-outlaws-female-genital-mutilation-.html?smid=fb-share&fbclid=IwAR0CTSlOQkmRX_mw9Ff0okprUdeMB8tdWC6vP6GhkKZv_3ZB0wECo2FEfHI

They've been trying for many years to make this law, but have been repeatedly quashed by religious conservatives.  Of course, just having the law will not end the practice.  Hopefully, they will start prosecuting.  And maybe it will eliminate Sudan as a place for Muslims in Western countries to take their girls to be cut.

 

Quote

 

Yet prosecutions are rare, and the operations continue quietly, with 70 percent of Egyptian women between 15 and 49 having been cut, mostly before they reach the age of 12, according to the United Nations.

Earlier this year, a 12-year-old Egyptian girl died on an operating table at a private clinic as a retired doctor performed genital mutilation without an anesthetic. In February, the Egyptian authorities referred the doctor and the girl’s parents for prosecution.

 

 

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Hindu Canadians are being calls ‘islamophbic’ for  opposing the loudspeaker jihad launched by Mosques and Mullahs in Canada

https://medium.com/@harbir/hindus-arent-bigots-canada-you-re-ignorant-and-foolishly-arrogant-e0b10f9f864

 

And the battle over mosque loudspeakers heads to court. Tarek Fahah’s column on the machinations of Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/fatah-mosque-loudspeaker-saga-continues


 

 

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A good piece from Salim Mansur on the rule of law and preferential treatment for one group

https://thenationaltelegraph.com/opinion/salim-mansur-call-to-prayer-and-the-rule-of-law

When mayors and city councillors favour one group ahead of the rest, the rest need to sound the alarm. To warn its residents and taxpayers that the rule of law has been subverted.

If not checked and reversed, then the rule of law, which binds people together in our beloved democracy, will unravel and eventually break.

The raging controversy surrounding the public Call to Prayer during Ramadan is an example of local politicians privileging one group of people, in this instance, based on their religion, over the rest.

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For Mohammed the call to prayer was a way of marking his territory:

Quote

When the apostle raided a people he waited until the morning.  If he heard a call to prayer he held back; if he did not hear it he attacked.  We came to Khaybar by night, and the apostle passed the night there; and when morning came he did not hear the call to prayer, so he rode and we rode with him. (Ibn Ishaq/Hisham 757)

No raids here, of course, but has that one basic purpose of the call to prayer really changed that much,  I wonder.

Edited by Infidel Dog

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On 5/18/2020 at 8:57 PM, scribblet said:

The raging controversy surrounding the public Call to Prayer during Ramadan is an example of local politicians privileging one group of people, in this instance, based on their religion, over the rest.

Who's 'the rest' here and how were they neglected?

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15 hours ago, Marocc said:

Who's 'the rest' here and how were they neglected?

I'm sure you can figure it out for yourself

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1 hour ago, Marocc said:

I really do not know.

I think I can help.

He's saying allowing the call to prayer is Politicians favoring one group of people over "the rest."

So the one group of people would be the Muslims. And "the rest" would be what you might call "Kafir" or unbeliever or infidel.

No need to thank me. I'm happy to help.

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Now as to "neglect," that would be your word not his.

I imagine it would be possible to disapprove of both of say church bells and the call to prayer. It would however be possible to see banning church bells while allowing the call to prayer as being unfair.

If that ever happens, I mean.

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1 hour ago, Infidel Dog said:

He's saying allowing the call to prayer is Politicians favoring one group of people over "the rest."

I believe they have in mind something more specific. In fact, I find it amazing some people have difficulty in pronouncing their ideas clearly, while they have no problem supporting gross, clearly expressed ideas. Can the difficulty be caused by shame or the fear of being exposed somehow?

You didn't address my question about how 'the rest' were neglected.

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1 minute ago, Marocc said:

You didn't address my question about how 'the rest' were neglected.

Yeah, I did. You seem to have missed my second post.

Quote

I believe they have in mind something more specific. In fact, I find it amazing some people have difficulty in pronouncing their ideas clearly, while they have no problem supporting gross, clearly expressed ideas. Can the difficulty be caused by shame or the fear of being exposed somehow?

I'm all ears then. What is this "more specific" thing you believe people are afraid to talk about?

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