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betsy

The Political Agenda in Our Midst

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I suspect she has only read a source that has already twisted it. Here is the curriculum document if it hasn't been posted already: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/elementary/health1to8.pdf

I had a chat with a religious family member that had been reading all sorts of nasty things about the new phy-ed and health curriculum. So I sat down with her and went through it. As it turns out her trusted Christian blogs were not at all truthful in their reporting about the content. She assured me that the blogs were likely led astray for understandable reasons. That was more than six months ago and the blogs have not posted any sort of correct or follow up. I really should ask my aunt for her thoughts on that lack of accountability.

There's no point in giving the document - I already gave it, and quoted the statement that's relevant. It's right in there!

Scroll down, and read Grade 6 section!

If you don't want to read it, that's your problem. Not mine.

But I'm not going to waste time arguing with you guys. Especially the usual suspects who'd been found to be most likely ignorant of issues! I'm not here trying to convince you - take it, or leave it.

Edited by betsy

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I'm not here trying to convince you - take it, or leave it.

I think that's the closest you'll get to an apology for making stuff up.

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There's no point in giving the document - I already gave it, and quoted the statement that's relevant. It's right in there!

Scroll down, and read Grade 6 section!

is this your way of peeling back and retracting all those mind numbing "enthusiastic" references to "6 year old Grade 6 students" that you made... in your most enthusiastic bold-highlighted, red-coloured, and large font-sized lettering?

I've also got my copy of the Ontario Curriculum ready and primed to that Grade 6 section. Rather than make MLW members "go fetch" and try to find just what you claimed you quoted, why not just be direct and state it again - yes? Surely this isn't a problem for you, is it?

.

If you don't want to read it, that's your problem. Not mine.

But I'm not going to waste time arguing with you guys. Especially the usual suspects who'd been found to be most likely ignorant of issues! I'm not here trying to convince you - take it, or leave it.

if you're not here to, as you say, "convince you (guys)"... just why are you posting with all your religious fervor? If you're not prepared to speak to so-called, 'skeptics, atheists, agnostics... heathens', aren't you just preaching to the choir?

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A link to the curriculum has been posted a few times in this thread, but since the document is large and not easy to follow I have pulled out the four Sexual Health sections from the Grade 6 Health and Phys-Ed curriculum in this post.

The Human Development and Sexual Health section is part of the Healthy Living Strand. The grade 6, Healthy Living strand begins on page 171. From the chart you can see that C1.3, C2.5, C2.6 and C3.3 are the four parts of the grade 6 curriculum relating to sexual health. http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/elementary/health1to8.pdf

C1.3 172

Human Development and Sexual Health

C1.3 identify factors that affect the development of a person’s self-concept (e.g., environment, evaluations by others who are important to them, stereotypes, awareness of strengths and needs, social competencies, cultural and gender identity, support, body image, mental health and emotional well-being, physical abilities) [PS]

Teacher prompt: “A person’s self-concept and emotional health and well-being can be affected by a number of factors. Some of these are external factors – they come from outside ourselves. Others are internal factors – they come from within ourselves. Can you give me examples of external and internal factors that are protective – things that help a person develop a positive self-concept and improve their emotional well-being?”

Student: “Protective external factors include having support from family and caring adults, having a safe place to live, and being involved in activities that make you feel proud of what you’ve accomplished. Protective internal factors include having a sense of purpose in life, being able to attain and sustain a clear sense of who you are, feeling that you have the right and are capable of taking steps to make things better, having clear boundaries, being optimistic, having high expectations of yourself, and having the skills you need to solve problems.”

C2.5 Page 174

C2.5 describe how they can build confidence and lay a foundation for healthy relationships by acquiring a clearer understanding of the physical, social, and emotional changes that occur during adolescence (e.g., physical: voice changes, skin changes, body growth; social: changing social relationships, increasing influence of peers; emotional: increased intensity of feelings, new interest in relationships with boys or girls, confusion and questions about changes) [PS]

Teacher prompt: “By getting questions answered and understanding that questions and changes are ‘normal’, adolescents will be better equipped to understand themselves, relate to others, respond to challenges and changes in relationships, and build confidence. What are some questions that young people might have as changes happen during puberty and adolescence?”

Student: “Is how I am feeling normal? Why is my body different from everybody else’s? How do you tell someone you like them? Who can answer my questions about…?”

• • • • •

Teacher prompt: “Things like wet dreams or vaginal lubrication are normal and happen as a result of physical changes with puberty. Exploring one’s body by touching or masturbating is something that many people do and find pleasurable. It is common and is not harmful and is one way of learning about your body.”

C2.6 Page 175

C2.6 make informed decisions that demonstrate respect for themselves and others and help to build healthier relationships, using a variety of living skills (e.g., personal and interpersonal skills; critical and creative thinking skills; skills based on First Nation, Métis, and Inuit cultural teachings, such as medicine wheel teachings connected to the four colour or seven grandfather teachings, or other cultural teachings) [iS, CT]

Teacher prompt: “In many ways, dating relationships can be similar to other relationships, such as those with friends or family. Relationships we see online or in the media are not always accurate and can send false messages. What are some of the signs of a healthy relationship, and what are some signs of potential trouble?”

Student: “In a healthy relationship, people show respect and care for each other. They try to communicate well and are honest with each other. Jealousy or behaviour that is too controlling can be signs of trouble.”

Teacher: “How does knowing yourself help you to make healthy decisions when you are in a relationship?”

Student: “Being clear about your own values, priorities, strengths, and needs can help you separate what is important to you from what is not. Knowing yourself well can help you see what you need to work on to make the relationship better.”

Teacher: “What communication skills can help you send information, receive information, and interpret information in an effective way in a relationship?”

Student: “Being respectful but clear about your ideas and feelings; listening actively; interpreting body language, tone of voice, and facial expressions; respecting signals of agreement or disagreement and consent or lack of consent; and negotiating – all these are important skills. A clear “yes” is a signal of consent. A response of ”no”, an uncertain response, or silence needs to be understood as no consent.”

Teacher: “What social attitudes and behaviours are important in building a healthy relationship?”

Student: “It is important to have respect for others, show that you value differences, and be cooperative.”

Teacher: “What should you consider when making any decision regarding a relationship?”

Student: “My comfort level, my personal and family values, my personal limits, and the limits and comfort of others are some of the things I should consider.”

Teacher: “Changing or ending relationships can be difficult. What are some ways to deal positively with changing or ending relationships?”

Student: “Talk about how you feel with someone you trust. Think about what you can learn from the situation that you can apply in the future. Remember that although the hurt feelings can be very intense at the beginning, you will start feeling a little better over time. If you are the one ending the relationship, treat the other person with respect and consider how they may be feeling. Try to explain how you feel. Ending a relationship over the phone or online may not be a sensitive approach.”

C3.3 On Page 177

C3.3 assess the effects of stereotypes, including homophobia and assumptions regarding gender roles and expectations, sexual orientation, gender expression, race, ethnicity or culture, mental health, and abilities, on an individual’s self-concept, social inclusion, and relationships with others, and propose appropriate ways of responding to and changing assumptions and stereotypes [PS, CT]

Teacher prompt: “Can you give examples of some stereotypes that might have a negative effect on a person’s self-concept and social inclusion? What can we do to change stereotypes and discrimination?”

Student: “People who are overweight are sometimes labelled as lazy. That’s not fair. And it’s not fair to make assumptions about what people with disabilities are able to do. We need to base our opinions of people on who they are and what they do and not judge them by their appearance or make assumptions about them. There are also negative stereotypes about people who receive extra help or people who receive good marks in class. These can be hurtful and cause people to avoid getting help when they need it or, sometimes, to hide their abilities. Someone who has a mental illness like depression or an anxiety disorder may be seen as being different. We need to remember that mental illness can affect anyone, and it can be treated. Cultural stereotypes are also common. Sometimes people make assumptions that people from a certain cultural background all like the same things or are all good at the same things. That makes us misjudge them. To change stereotypes, we need to get to know people and respond to them as individuals. We need to challenge stereotypes when we hear them.”

• • • • •

Teacher prompt: “Assumptions are often made about what is ‘normal’ or expected for males and females – for example, men take out the garbage; nursing is a woman’s job; boys play soccer at recess and girls skip rope or stand around and talk; boys are good at weightlifting and girls are good at dancing. Assumptions like these are usually untrue, and they can be harmful. They can make people who do not fit into the expected norms feel confused or bad about themselves, damaging their self-concept, and they can cause people to discriminate against and exclude those who are seen as ‘different’. Assumptions about different sexual orientations or about people with learning disabilities or mental illness or about people from other cultures are harmful in similar ways. Everyone needs to feel accepted in school and in the community. Why do you think these stereotyped assumptions occur? What can be done to change or challenge them?”

Students: “Stereotypes are usually formed when we do not have enough information. We can get rid of a lot of stereotypes just by finding out more about people who seem different. By being open-minded, observing and listening, asking questions, getting more information, and considering different perspectives, we can work to change stereotypes. We can understand people’s sexual orientations better, for example, by reading books that describe various types of families and relationships. Not everyone has a mother and a father – someone might have two mothers or two fathers (or just one parent or a grandparent, a caregiver, or a guardian). We need to make sure that we don’t assume that all couples are of the opposite sex, and show this by the words we use. For example, we could use a word like ‘partner’ instead of ‘husband’ or ‘wife’. We need to be inclusive and welcoming.” “If we have newcomers from another country in our class, we can try to find out more about them, their culture, and their interests.” “If we hear things that are sexist, homophobic, or racist, we can show our support for those who are being disrespected.” “If we hear someone using words like ‘crazy’ or ‘nuts’ to describe a person who has a mental illness, we can explain that mental illness is no different from other illnesses, and that we wouldn’t call someone names if they were suffering from any other illness.”

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This is the example Teacher prompt and Student response from the Grade 6 curriculum that deals with consent. It can be found in C2.6 on page 175

Teacher: “What communication skills can help you send information, receive information, and interpret information in an effective way in a relationship?”

Student: “Being respectful but clear about your ideas and feelings; listening actively; interpreting body language, tone of voice, and facial expressions; respecting signals of agreement or disagreement and consent or lack of consent; and negotiating – all these are important skills. A clear “yes” is a signal of consent. A response of ”no”, an uncertain response, or silence needs to be understood as no consent.”

Does anyone honestly feel that is too scandalous for students in grade 6?

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Does anyone honestly feel that is too scandalous for students in grade 6?

there is certainly one MLW member who honestly feels that way!

.

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there is certainly one MLW member who honestly feels that way!

.

My guess is she trusted a Christian blog source and was duped by their false assertions. This is a common theme in her threads. I'm hoping it is becoming clear, that for her go to Creationist and Christian authors, the agenda trumps the truth.

Edited by Guest

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Odd that this discussion ended when facts were posted. It's a shame Christian blogs don't deal in reality.

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