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I never type anything...anything into a computer that I don't want to see on the front page of the Globe and Mail. That is my privacy setting. 

That being said, some years ago, Danny Finkelman  noted that people desire security over privacy. The legal system in red China is harsh, but efficient. You are accused of a crime, you appear before a judge and then they take you outside and blow your brains out. I wonder what the deterrent effect is?

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On 3/31/2018 at 12:36 PM, Queenmandy85 said:

I never type anything...anything into a computer that I don't want to see on the front page of the Globe and Mail. That is my privacy setting. 

That being said, some years ago, Danny Finkelman  noted that people desire security over privacy. The legal system in red China is harsh, but efficient. You are accused of a crime, you appear before a judge and then they take you outside and blow your brains out. I wonder what the deterrent effect is?

If you use any kind of wifi technology in your home and where your devices have mics, you won't need to type anything on the Internet in order to be under surveillance.

Siri, Cortana, Google and Alexa ....These devices are listening all the time.

https://techcrunch.com/2015/09/11/apple-addresses-privacy-questions-about-hey-siri-and-live-photo-features/

Then ....

https://globalnews.ca/news/3330143/how-to-stop-gadgets-from-spying/

This is why I say that most people are ignorant to how the tech is being used. Most think it is restricted to just what you type which is not the case.

Now consider this scenario. Even if you do not have the Internet or any listening devices and such, your friends do and they use them all the time. How do you avoid that when in most cases you have no idea if some device is listening.

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My point is that I always presume someone is listening. I used the computer as an example. I don't have a cell phone, not because I am paranoid, but because I don't need one, so Siri and her friends are not my concern. 

If I've learned anything from watching 30 years of Coronation Street:

 a) Nobody can keep a secret

b.) If someone says "You have to tell him," don't tell him.

Edited by Queenmandy85
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  • 4 months later...
  • 1 year later...

China continues to develop and expand its surveillance technology into every part of people's lives, and is now exporting it abroad. It's linking it with AI that will soon be able to combine everything it takes in about a person, from every single thing they buy, to every single place they go, to everything they read or say online. It can analyze whether people are behaving differently, like going out the back door instead of the front, whether they are using more electricity, which might indicate they have a guest, or even if they are not using their phone. All can draw police interest.

China already has hundreds of millions of surveillance cameras in place. Xi’s government hopes to soon achieve full video coverage of key public areas. Much of the footage collected by China’s cameras is parsed by algorithms for security threats of one kind or another. In the near future, every person who enters a public space could be identified, instantly, by AI matching them to an ocean of personal data, including their every text communication, and their body’s one-of-a-kind protein-construction schema. In time, algorithms will be able to string together data points from a broad range of sources—travel records, friends and associates, reading habits, purchases—to predict political resistance before it happens. China’s government could soon achieve an unprecedented political stranglehold on more than 1 billion people.

...

The government might soon have a rich, auto-populating data profile for all of its 1 billion–plus citizens. Each profile would comprise millions of data points, including the person’s every appearance in surveilled space, as well as all of her communications and purchases. Her threat risk to the party’s power could constantly be updated in real time, with a more granular score than those used in China’s pilot “social credit” schemes, which already aim to give every citizen a public social-reputation score based on things like social-media connections and buying habits. Algorithms could monitor her digital data score, along with everyone else’s, continuously, without ever feeling the fatigue that hit Stasi officers working the late shift. False positives—deeming someone a threat for innocuous behavior—would be encouraged, in order to boost the system’s built-in chilling effects, so that she’d turn her sharp eyes on her own behavior, to avoid the slightest appearance of dissent.

If her risk factor fluctuated upward—whether due to some suspicious pattern in her movements, her social associations, her insufficient attention to a propaganda-consumption app, or some correlation known only to the AI—a purely automated system could limit her movement. It could prevent her from purchasing plane or train tickets. It could disallow passage through checkpoints. It could remotely commandeer “smart locks” in public or private spaces, to confine her until security forces arrived.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2020/09/china-ai-surveillance/614197/

 

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