Jump to content
Political Discussion Forums
GostHacked

Iran needs some democracy

Recommended Posts

The USA is playing dangerous with an outright cyberwar on Iran. This is still a war action and should have gotten approval for it. No matter cyber or a drone close to the airspace. Iran has every right to retaliate against the USA.

The USA is at war with Iran, no matter how one frames it.   The US Media is framing this as as Iran attacking the USA when it is a defensive posture they are taking. I am sure if Iran was flying drones of the USA coast or close to USA airspace, the USA would shoot it down, even over international waters, and they would say, 'not giving Iran the chance'. 

The USA flew a drone near Iranian airspace to provoke them into shooting it down so the USA can attack Iran. The USA is instigating another war.  And the reason we are hearing on the news is the price of oil. The USA wants to kill the Iranian economy and to eliminate their oil exports by putting more sanctions on them.

Fuck the USA. They are about to destroy yet another nation with no plans of rebuild.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/iran-us-tensions-pompeo-drones-1.5187240

Quote

U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Monday imposing fresh sanctions on Iran, amid increased tensions between the long-time foes.

Trump initially told reporters the sanctions, which will target Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and his office, were in response to Tehran's downing of a U.S. drone last week. Tehran has said the drone was flying in its airspace, which Washington has denied.

Later, Trump said the sanctions would have been imposed regardless of the incident over the drone. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said the order was in the works before last week's downing, but was in response to that as well as to previous Iranian actions in the Gulf.

 

The United States has also blamed Iran for attacks earlier this month on two oil tankers at the entrance of the Gulf of Oman. Iran, in turn, has denied that it is to blame.

Mnuchin said the new executive order signed by Trump will lock up billions of additional dollars in Iranian assets, squeezing the country further.

This does not hurt the government, this hurts civilians.  The sanctions in Iraq were directly contributing to much strife and death within the country. Sure let's make the people suffer instead.  Shameful that Trump is using their provocation against Iran with drones and when they get shot down, the USA will cry foul and then increase their attack 10 fold (Meaning disproportionate response).

IF Trump was concerned about 150 people dying from the air strikes he called off,  then he will be sentencing thousands to death with increasing sanctions on Iran and would call those sanctions off right away,. But nope, executive order.  Trump is very stupid.

 

The USA is using something called 'crisis initiation' .

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iran did not attack the tankers and did not shoot down the US drone either. It was likely the Revolutionary guards who attacked the tankers without the knowledge and approval of Iranian government or may be even without the approval of some elements in the Iran's regime. They are trying to provoke the US into a limited attack on Iran so that they have an excuse to grab even more power or even topple Iran's government and take over completely (the US does not have the military strength or the will or the balls to start a full scale war or invade Iran as they did in Iraq as Iran military is much stronger and Iran population much more and Iran is much larger and full of mountains). The US will one day smart up and realize that the only way to bring peace and stability to the middle east and the world and eliminate threat of nuclear war is to topple Iran regime and superficial acts like sanctions and limited military strike is only going to backfire while hurting the innocent Iran nation who are caught in the middle and sanctions and worse limited strikes will only strengthen the hardliners and revolutionary guards in Iran who enjoy the enormous wealth while the rest of nation lives in poverty and get poorer every day thank to US stupidity and lack of knowledge about regional politics.

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/24/2019 at 7:11 AM, GostHacked said:

. They are about to destroy yet another nation with no plans of rebuild.

 

The nation was destroyed in 1979 when the so called revolution (which was an illegal coup) took place. And yes the USA had a lot to do with it. Not only under cover they facilitate the transfer of power and back stabbed their long time ally (the peanut brain Carter) but also 25 years before that when they make a pact with the devil (united kingdom) and stage a military coup in Iran and toppled the elected government of the time and this action led to the 1979 uprising. Military strikes or action is not the way now and the US does not have the ability anyhow. However, they can help the popular opposition groups (the Crown Prince, the National Front who briefly came to power in 1953) to topple the regime. Those leftists who aided the Ayatollahs to come to power will never be voted in by the nation in a democratic manner.The US has to invest billions and get serious. My message to Trump is less talk and more action. The right action less stupidity and less arrogance. US of A military cannot defeat Iran so stop idiocy. 

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/iran-breach-nuclear-deal-what-next-1.5196527

The US pulled out of the deal some time ago, so they got no grounds to complain about but will use this against Iran for the push for more war.

Quote

As far as violations of the Iran nuclear pact go, this may not be the one to panic about just yet.

Iran's first confirmed breach of the 2015 nuclear deal doesn't rise to the level of a direct danger, according to proliferation experts. But they say the White House appears to be dramatizing the non-compliance to pressure European powers to shun Tehran before a more significant violation can happen.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have talked a lot about Iranian politics in this thread but find out interesting facts about Iran and its people not what its dreadful self-imposed regime wishes to put in your minds.

https://www.icepop.com/interesting-iran-facts/

Make sure you scroll all pages and pictures. Needless to say most hijabs that you see in pictures are mandatory and hated. So are the turbans (hated), especially those who wear them.

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A fitting consequence considering the fucking British dragged the stupid Americans into Iran in the first place.

If Sheer was in power he'd likely volunteer Canada's services.  We're like Hobbits that bring a nice moral shine to an amoral venture.

Edited by eyeball

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deadly resumption of mass anti-regime protests in Iran

Small scale Protests against the islamic republic never ended in Iran since started in late 2017 but as mass protests resumed last weekend the regime cracks down even more violently while Western democracies remain silent. While the regime has completely shut down internet so that the outside world would not find out about the violent crack down and made it criminal to post videos of the uprising, amnesty International fears over a hundred killed by regime's militia and thousands more wounded or arrested. Protests however continue unabated with peaceful crowds gathering in over 100 cities calling for the overthrow of islamic regime.  In what the opposition and eye witnesses reporting from inside the country it appears that plainclothes regime mercenaries are purposely attacking public buses, emergency vehicles,  government buildings and hundreds of banks setting them on fire to give an excuse and legitimacy for regime to crack down on hungry poverty stricken demonstrates in a brutal manner. 

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/11/pattern-amnesty-106-killed-iran-protests-191119182957473.html

Amnesty International researcher on Iran says:

"The information that we have obtained reveals a horrific pattern of unlawful killings across the country," she told Al Jazeera from London. 

"The information that we've received so far suggests that in a pattern consistent with past practices, security forces are even refusing to return the bodies of many of those killed to their families, or are forcing families to bury their loved ones under rushed circumstances and without an independent autopsy, which is of course against international law and standards.

 

 

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The scale of brutality by Iran islamic regime is beginning to surface as internet is gradually coming back.

 Iranian authorities are deliberately covering up the scale of the mass crackdown against protesters, Human Rights Watch said today. The government should immediately announce the number of deaths, arrests, and detentions from the recent protests and permit an independent inquiry into alleged abuses.

Human rights groups estimate that more than 140 people were killed and that security forces arrested up to 7,000 people in protests that broke out on the evening of November 15, 2019 in more than 100 locations across Iran. On November 16, authorities shut down the internet, which has not fully been restored. Mobile access is still particularly scarce.

Twelve days after protests broke out in Iran, the authorities have refused to provide an accurate death toll and instead threatened detainees with death,”. “Keeping families in the dark about the fate of their loved ones while ratcheting up an atmosphere of fear and retribution is a deliberate government strategy to stifle dissent.”

On November 25 and 26, the Human Rights Activists News Agency (Hrana), an independent Iranian human rights news website, reported that officials had announced the arrest of at least 97 people as “leaders” or “influential actors” in what the government described as “riots,” accusing them without evidence of causing damage to public property. On November 23, the group reported that, based on a compilation of official announcements, the authorities had arrested between 2,437 and 2,871 people.

Hrana estimates that as many as 3,980 people may have been arrested based on activists’ reports. On November 26, the Iranian newspaper Etemad reported that Naghavi Hosseini, a parliament member, had said that the number of arrests during the protests was actually about 7,000, indicating the widespread nature of the crackdown.

Video footage on social media clearly shows security forces using firearms targeting protesters. IranWire news agency reported on November 26 that one of people killed during the protests was Amirreza Abdollahi, a 13-year-old boy. According to IranWire, the authorities only delivered his body to his family after three days and the family was only allowed to bury him in a small private gathering.

Numerous reports on social media indicate that families have not been able to get the bodies of their loved ones and have been restricted in their ability to perform burial services. Ali Fadavi, the deputy to the commander-in-chief of the Islamic Revolution Guards corps (IRGC), has accused protesters of being armed and shooting at people although he provided no evidence.

Iranian authorities continue to deliberately hide the scale of their vicious crackdown on people protesting for a better life,” Page said. “The UN Human Rights Council and other international bodies will need to hold Iranian officials to account so long as Iran’s government is unwilling to do so

https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/11/27/iran-deliberate-coverup-brutal-crackdown

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the whole point. Iran was a democracy under Pahlavi dynasty before the coup of 1979 for 50 years (total freedom except maybe political freedom) so this nation is not used to and is not accepting theocracy anymore as the young generation see in the videos how free and happy their patents were boys and girls dating, pictures of clubs and mixed swimming pools and streets full of fun so Iran nation is saying loud and clear they do not want this self imposed theocracy and want it OUT.

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eyewitness accounts of unrest in Iran

Teacher, 37, from Tehran: "The news that gasoline prices would now double, from 1,500 toman to 3,000 toman (around 60 euro cents) per liter hit like a bang. At first, there was a silent protest in front of the university building. In addition to being a high school teacher, I am also completing a doctorate in architecture. I happened to be there when security forces in civilian clothes surrounded and removed some of the demonstrators. I wanted to get home fast, but the Revolutionary Guards stopped me. They called me a "traitor" and a "slut" and said I wasn't a real Muslim. They arrested me too. The police station was totally overcrowded. They insulted and intimidated me. I was allowed to leave after a few hours.

I rushed home. My brother wasn't there. No one had heard from him for 24 hours. A few days ago on Instagram, he wrote, "I have an important question for our leaders: You are so proud of the many missiles you have built to fight Israel. Are you also saving on gas there?" My brother is 27 years old and studying law.

Our internet connected was dead. The phones didn't work. We checked the police stations. It turned out the Revolutionary Guards had arrested him. We kept negotiating until he finally got released. He was totally exhausted. They had terrorized and humiliated him. He was ashamed to say what really happened to him in jail. We now know that many young demonstrators were killed. Just like that, shot on the street."

Islamic Theology student 56, from Shiraz: "When I came back from Tehran to my hometown of Shiraz this week, the streets in the north were full of people. We drove through the Maliabad district, where there are two gas stations. They were on fire. The driver said people were protesting over gas prices. He said they had set the gas stations on fire.

I am very religious and began pursuing a degree in Islamic theology at a later stage in my life. I trust the wisdom of our spiritual leader Khamenei. Closeness to God fulfills me. The protesters are enemies of our republic. They are being manipulated by our opponents, the Zionists. They support U.S. President Donald Trump's imperialist ideas. The Americans want to destroy Islam.

I don't really think there's a shortage of gasoline in Iran. It's all propaganda. President Hassan Rohani wants to stir up unrest in the Islamic Republic to please the Americans. He's a puppet of imperialism. He must have lost his faith.

I live in Farhang Shahr, a middle-class area. The enemies of the state also gathered there. The security forces pushed the demonstrators back. They told the protesters to go home. Then shots were fired. It must have been agents of Israel and America who sought to further incite demonstrators against the government.

We're being bombarded from the outside with false information. That's why it's good for the government to turn off the internet. Then the U.S. and Israel won't be able to continue wrongly and negatively influencing people here."

Web designer, 32, from Shiraz: "In the beginning, we, the protesters, walked silently down the street. The crowd kept growing. Then, some started shouting slogans, like: "Not Lebanon, not Gaza, I will only sacrifice myself for my fatherland Iran!" The idea was that Iran should not interfere with the conflicts of Arab countries. Another slogan was: "Our enemy isn't America, our enemy is here!" Shots were fired. They were trying to scare us. They also used tear gas. Civilian police, who had only moments ago been walking with the crowd as if they belonged to the demonstrators, suddenly began arresting people. Everyone panicked and scattered.

We just wanted someone to listen to our problems -- they mayor of Shiraz, for example, or an imam. But no one came. The reality is that other prices will go up along with gasoline prices -- bread, eggs, meat, rent. A lot of people are losing their jobs right now.

We're four people in my family. We all live in the same apartment. My dad works as a painter, my mother is a teacher, I'm a web designer and my brother is employed by the city. But the high inflation means we still don't have enough money to buy things like fresh fruit every day. We never go on vacation. We seldom invite friends over anymore. We can only afford meat once a week. The recent price increase just went too far. The situation gets even worse with each new uprising. I would like to start a family, but I can't afford it. Nobody gives us any help. Has the world forgotten us?"

City tour guide, 30, from Shiraz: "Our office is located directly on the big street where the protests took place. Many tourists from Europe, Sweden, Germany and England who had signed up for tours have since canceled their trips because of the unrest. For us, this means we won't make any money yet again.

My cousin Rubina called. She was upset and crying and said she had gotten caught up in a demonstration in front of the university in Maliabad. She saw a fellow student get shot in the head. He fell to the ground and everyone screamed. Rubina thinks he died before the ambulance arrived to take him away. The Revolutionary Guards had simply mingled among the protesters. That's why we no longer know which of the demonstrators belong to us and which belong to them

On Tuesday, my cousin and I arranged to meet in the city center, at the intersection near the Saadi cinema. Protesters had just set banks there on fire. They wanted to send a message against inflation. There were police and intelligence service people everywhere. It was chaotic. We stayed in the background because we feared they would shoot again.

They're blocking the internet so that none of this gets out. They're cutting us off. Blood is being shed again in vain. We need this connection to the outside world. Call us! Come to our country! Don't forget us."

Architect, 28, from Bushehr: "The price increases have really upset people. The protesters have been normal, mostly poorer people. They made no secret of how fed up they are with the government. They want a regime change.

There were police and members of the Revolutionary Guard everywhere. They aimed hot water at the demonstrators and used tear gas. I saw it myself. It was eerie to observe how they neither allowed the protesters to move forward nor backward. This country has no plan for the future. The economic situation is no longer bearable. It is entirely unclear what will happen next. Perhaps the Iranians will soon be at each other's throats?

My wife's trying to get a student visa for Canada right now. I just want to leave this country."

Businessman, 37, from Tehran: "We're a family business that sells technical equipment. Things were going quite well for us, but everything has been back to zero since the sanctions went into full force again. We are living off our savings. Costs are constantly increasing as incomes decline. The economic pressure on the people has now led to this backlash.

It was the poorer people from the south who took to the streets in Tehran. They set banks on fire as a statement against inflation. In the nearby town of Karaj, people deliberately created traffic jams on the highway. The anger is unrestrained. But the Revolutionary Guard showed up everywhere at once. They were very harsh toward the demonstrators.

Mistrust toward President Hassan Rohani is growing in Iran. The government is chaotic. The people are suffering extremely from the fact that few countries are willing to work with Iran. Things can't continue like this. We now have the feeling that we have been left completely alone here. No one in the outside world will know if they are persecuting or killing us."

Art teacher, 43, Shiraz: "I haven't allowed my son to go to school for a week now. We've barely left our home since the unrest began. The atmosphere outside is tense and things are only slowly quieting down. Banks and other institutions in Tehran have been set on fire and destroyed. What's left is a feeling of serious insecurity. Our trust in this government has been exhausted. There's fraud and corruption everywhere. Things can't go on like this. I can't see anything positive here any longer. My husband and I both make money, but it's not enough to make ends meet. We're so tired of this fight. I wish I could travel back through time to the days before the revolution. Everything needs to change. I would love to live in another country."

https://www.spiegel.de/international/world/eyewitnesses-on-the-unrest-in-iran-a-1298170.html

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Iranian regime will only change when it is changed from the inside. It is unlikely that an insurrection of the Iranian liberal-minded middle class will do that. We will have to see some sort of deep contradiction within the current ruling powers develop into a split, in which one side leans on the liberal middle class for support.  Either that, or the gradual transformation of enough of the Iranian 'cultural apparatus' -- its teachers, lawyers, doctors, bureaucrats -- so that, following the death of the current rightwing leader, the country spontaneously moves towards democracy. (This is what happened in Spain. it was ruled for more than 25 years by a near-fascist regime, which, however, modernized the country, just like Iran. When Franco died, the country quickly became a modern democracy.

How to help this process along?  Recognize Iran, trade with her, help build up an educated, internationally-minded middle class.

And if the Sunnis and the Shias of that part of the world want to make war with each other ... dear God, let's stay out of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/29/2019 at 12:32 PM, Doug1943 said:

The Iranian regime will only change when it is changed from the inside. It is unlikely that an insurrection of the Iranian liberal-minded middle class will do that. We will have to see some sort of deep contradiction within the current ruling powers develop into a split, in which one side leans on the liberal middle class for support.  Either that, or the gradual transformation of enough of the Iranian 'cultural apparatus' -- its teachers, lawyers, doctors, bureaucrats -- so that, following the death of the current rightwing leader, the country spontaneously moves towards democracy. (This is what happened in Spain. it was ruled for more than 25 years by a near-fascist regime, which, however, modernized the country, just like Iran. When Franco died, the country quickly became a modern democracy.

How to help this process along?  Recognize Iran, trade with her, help build up an educated, internationally-minded middle class.

And if the Sunnis and the Shias of that part of the world want to make war with each other ... dear God, let's stay out of it.

Interesting point but I think this isn’t about the liberal minded but the whole Iranian society. It is worth noting that what we are witnessing is a shift in paradigm. The regime’s slogans in the early days of revolution was primarily targeted at the poor/ working class. They were the pillars of the revolution that bolstered their political and religious sphere. The working class were made promises about reforms and getting subsidies from the government. Interestingly, the systematic sanctions put in place by the US and the recent rise in fuel has hit the very core of supporters of the regime that in essence supported it. Higher petrol prices mean that those who often do more than one job and do taxi work will now have to pay more for fuel which inevitably eats into their wages And a spiral down absolute poverty. When people are hungry they don’t care about religion or politics. The disgruntled poor are now at odds with the clergies. The lessons of cold war and USSR manifests this belief which led to the end of nuclear arms race... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/29/2019 at 6:32 AM, Doug1943 said:

The Iranian regime will only change when it is changed from the inside. It is unlikely that an insurrection of the Iranian liberal-minded middle class will do that. We will have to see some sort of deep contradiction within the current ruling powers develop into a split, in which one side leans on the liberal middle class for support.  Either that, or the gradual transformation of enough of the Iranian 'cultural apparatus' -- its teachers, lawyers, doctors, bureaucrats -- so that, following the death of the current rightwing leader, the country spontaneously moves towards democracy. (This is what happened in Spain. it was ruled for more than 25 years by a near-fascist regime, which, however, modernized the country, just like Iran. When Franco died, the country quickly became a modern democracy.

How to help this process along?  Recognize Iran, trade with her, help build up an educated, internationally-minded middle class.

No absolutely not. You are very wrong in your analysis proving a total lack of understanding of the situation. The policy of appeasement has been tried for decades again and again by past US presidents and Europe, and they all failed miserably. This regime is non-reformable and only understands the language of force. Removing it is the only way to secure the region and the world from their threats. It has to go away by force.  Trading with this brutal regime only extends the life of the regime and consequently the thread of war and instability for the region and the world. In addition it is both morally and legally very wrong. Recognizing this regime is saying yes to murder and torture and oppression.

The middle class is already educated and internationally minded but they do not stand a chance against such a brutal regime. This was proven in 2009. The regime is just too brutal and the middle class value their lives and rarely wish to risk live ammunition and torture extensively used by this regime against any opposing voice. The change has to come from the majority growing poor where the basij's families are also among them. For the first time the poor who used to be the core support for the islamic regime poured into streets and demanding the islamic regime to step down both in 2017`2018 and recent 2019 uprising.  There are also elements in the regime itself who are beginning to question the brutality used and the extend of corruption within the top elements of this regime, however, their own self interest prevents them from seriously threatening the existence of the regime. In addition almost all islamic clergy have remained silent and said nothing about brutality and corruptions of this regime.  With these scenarios in mind I don't see a peaceful change but rather a violent revolution by the growing poor against this corrupt violent islamic regime. For this to happen faster and with less bloodshed sanctions against the regime must continue and tighten up much more.

The Europeans and Russians and Chinese are prostituting themselves to the wrong horse. The Americans are backing the right horse that is the Iranian people and the opposition though they have to change the opposition they are supporting from the unpopular MEK to the popular Crown Prince the son of former Shah of Iran. And they have to militarily block even a drop of regime oil is not sold by totally naval blocking the Persian Gulf using their powerful navy. The income from the oil don't go to the poor but regime's corrupt elements and its thugs to suppress the defenseless nation of Iran.

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/28/2019 at 10:12 AM, CITIZEN_2015 said:

That is the whole point. Iran was a democracy under Pahlavi dynasty before the coup of 1979 for 50 years (total freedom except maybe political freedom) so this nation is not used to and is not accepting theocracy anymore as the young generation see in the videos how free and happy their patents were boys and girls dating, pictures of clubs and mixed swimming pools and streets full of fun so Iran nation is saying loud and clear they do not want this self imposed theocracy and want it OUT.

You’re going to have to give us more detail on the Pahlavi dynasty. Wiki does not make them sound great on the democracy/human rights front:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_the_Imperial_State_of_Iran

Like the Czars, they look better in retrospect because of their even more appalling successors but let’s be honest here - they were bad hombres all the same. 

Iran has always been a relatively advanced society compared to its neighbours. It’s up to educated, urban Iranians to convince their fellow citizens that the Western model is worth following. No other nation is going to force our system upon them. Unfortunately, as religious fervour ebbs, a military dictatorship may follow the mullahs. 

Edited by SpankyMcFarland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, SpankyMcFarland said:

You’re going to have to give us more detail on the Pahlavi dynasty. Wiki does not make them sound great on the democracy/human rights front:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_the_Imperial_State_of_Iran

Like the Czars, they look better in retrospect because of their even more appalling successors but let’s be honest here - they were bad hombres all the same. 

Iran has always been a relatively advanced society compared to its neighbours. It’s up to educated, urban Iranians to convince their fellow citizens that the Western model is worth following. No other nation is going to force our system upon them. Unfortunately, as religious fervour ebbs, a military dictatorship may follow the mullahs. 

Okay here is more details:

Wiki has been very unfair on Pahlavi dynasty and usually Wiki is not accurate. History will judge them but more importantly the nation of Iran especially the young generation has already judged them who under the gun and threat of violence by regime thugs bravely and openly and loudly call the names of Reza Shah (who suppressed the mullahs, asking for his soul to be blessed) and his son the Shah of Iran, the last monarch and demanding the return of the crown Prince to the thrown of Iran.

Look at time and location before citing biased WIKI and reaching false conclusions:

There was total freedom and equality under Pahlavi dynasty except political freedom and that was understandable in the 60's and 70;s Iran was a third world country and located in the Middle East not Europe   Even in Europe at the time half of (Eastern) Europe was under dictatorship,  A cold war raging and the soviet puppets trying to infiltrate Iran and take their borders to the warm waters of Persian Gulf. The communists especially the traitor pro-soviet Tudeh party was very active and the black reactionary forces (the mullahs) were seeking power so there had to be some political constraints and political prisoners and lack of political freedom. Iran's social and political standards were not exactly Western Europe to have total political freedom. Even in United Kingdom IRA prisoners were subjected to torture at the time so what did you expect? You expected Pahlavi dynasty grant freedom more than United Kingdom? Nazi Germany and Franco Spain same time or only a couple of  decades earlier.   But under Pahlavi dynasty there was Total social freedom, equality for women and minorities (religious minorities) and double digit economic growth. These qualities were only enjoyed by Iran in the region while the rest of middle east was under dark ages and total dictatorships. 

Iran was totally destroyed under Ghajar dynasty before Reza Shah the great (God bless his soul) took over and he started Pahlavi dynasty but Pahlavi dynasty restored and revived Iran in just 50 years bringing it up to Western standard and it would have been a major economic and military power now matching Japan if these apes (the black reactionary forces) had not taken over the planet. May be that was why the Shah was overthrown as his rapid modernization was against the Western interest.

My point was that unlike other countries in the region Iran nation is not used to theocracy and hence this nation will not accept this theocracy. Pahlavi dynasty did the job very well. Iran will not remain the planet of the apes for long thanks to 50 years of progressive Pahlavi dynasty during which Iran advanced 1500 years. Iran was a regional economic and military superpower in 1979, having total freedom and equality for women and religious minorities, highly westernized and educated middle class, with no enemies and many friends about to become a major industrial nation. look where it is now. The planet of the apes!!!! So you make your judgement on Pahlavi dynasty.

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In City of roses (Shiraz) alone 69 people are said to have been murdered by islamic regime in Shiraz alone while the city was freed for two days. Uprising against the regime also occurred in 100 other cities but the regime refuses to give a figure for the number of innocent lives lost to keep this bloodthirsty regime in power a while more but international agencies estimate in hundreds. Right now people give flowers to security forces and receive bullets in return in their backs. The regime spends on bullets and missiles instead of bread and food for people. Gives away nation's money to prop up murderous regimes like Assad while the nation of Iran is suffering. Regime official stealing funds belong to the people making top official millionaires and billionaires while the nation is suffering and hungry and the regime blames everything on the US!!!!! But the nation shouts "the enemy is right here but they lie and say it is America"!!!!

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/01/iran-fuel-protest-crackdowns-revealed-on-social-media

 

Clock is now ticking for the regime. Unlike previous uprisings THIS time it is the poor (the core religious regime supporters) who have joined the revolution to liberate their country and nation from the occupying force.

https://www.aa.com.tr/en/analysis/analysis-clock-ticking-against-iran/1660382

 

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, CITIZEN_2015 said:

Clock is now ticking for the regime. Unlike previous uprisings THIS time it is the poor (the core religious regime supporters) who have joined the revolution to liberate their country and nation from the occupying force.

https://www.aa.com.tr/en/analysis/analysis-clock-ticking-against-iran/1660382

 

The poor now joins the popular uprising against islamic regime

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/01/world/middleeast/iran-protests-deaths.html

Most of the nationwide unrest seemed concentrated in neighborhoods and cities populated by low-income and working-class families, suggesting this was an uprising born in the historically loyal power base of Iran’s post-revolutionary hierarchy.

Altogether, from 180 to 450 people, and possibly more, were killed in four days with at least 2,000 wounded and 7,000 detained, according to international rights organizations, opposition groups and local journalists.

 

 

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An article by Jason Rezaian an Iranian American Citizen who was taken hostage by the regime and tortured by regime thugs for many days

The regime in Iran may have succeeded — at least for the time being — in crushing the extraordinary spate of public protests that began on Nov. 16. But the country’s rulers and security forces managed to achieve this result only through the brazen application of force against their fellow citizens.

Amnesty International says at least 208 people have been killed, with the actual death toll potentially much higher.The events of the past two weeks have driven home an important lesson: The people of Iran have rediscovered their sense of agency — and no amount of state-administered violence will make them forget it.

The government is now restoring Internet service after a week-long shutdown that made it extremely difficult for outside observers to have a full picture of what was going on. What’s clear, though, is that these protests were deadlier than previous waves of unrest — including the one in 2009, which followed a fraudulent presidential election, or those in late 2017 and early 2018, which were sparked by the worsening economic situation.

The recent backlash was the clearest combination of an economic and political uprising we’ve seen to date. More and more Iranians feel as though they have little to lose; we saw that again and again in the grainy images of bravery and desperation that made it to the outside world.

This is a bad sign for the long-term viability of the Islamic republic. The regime can now have few illusions about the degree of popular support it enjoys among the population. It has long tried to compensate through a combination of subsidies and intimidation.

There are plenty of people outside of Iran, including within the U.S. government, salivating over what they see as the imminent demise of the Islamic republic. What they have failed to do so far, though, is offer any credible plans about what comes next.

This is because they are out of touch and disconnected. That’s not their fault. They aren’t there.

Various overseas groups — including the MEK, a reviled exile group that was long on the State Department’s terror list, and some backers of the last shah’s son — have been pushing claims that they’ve helped to establish an organized and representative opposition movement inside Iran that connects diaspora figures with protesters on the ground. Such assertions aren’t just disingenuous, they’re downright dangerous as they encourage people to risk their lives in the streets while having providing nothing as protection or actual support.

The reality is simple: The protests inside Iran were started by ordinary Iranians. They were the ones who put their lives on the line (and correspondingly bore the brunt of the violence). No one led them in this show of discontent — especially no one from the outside.

It’s ironic that members of the Iranian diaspora would choose to make claims to the contrary. In so doing, they are actually mimicking the regime, which likes to insist that protesters are just taking orders from foreign puppeteers.

Nonsense. Iran’s ultimate fate will be decided by the Iranians who live in the country — and a key constituency, for better or worse, will be those who currently hold the guns. The turning point in nearly every revolutionary uprising comes when members of the security forces or the military finally decide they’re no longer willing to kill their own compatriots for the sake of the regime that employs them.

Unfortunately, we are not seeing that yet. While there is always some anecdotal evidence of defections from the Revolutionary Guard Corps, so far we see few signs that significant numbers of the regime’s armed defenders are taking the side of the protesters. In fact, the opposite is true: Security forces did as they were told and gunned down hundreds of unarmed people.

Organization is the advantage that the authorities in Iran have always held over their opponents. That’s been the case in every previous round of protest in the Islamic republic’s 40-year history thus far.

Not only did they have a plan for putting down protests, they had one for shutting up the families of their victims as well. We’re hearing from many sources that officials are forcing the families of those killed to pay for recovering the bodies for burial. The government is also forcing survivors to say that the victims were regime loyalists killed by protesters. All this tells you everything you need to know about the brutality of the regime. But it also tells you that the government is far from willing to give up.

The intricacy of such plans, though, ignores a simple truth of 21st century life: Facts can’t be as easily wiped from the historical record as they may have been in the past. They can be obscured, and they can be manipulated, but they can’t be hidden for good.

It won’t be long before we see another round of protests, perhaps even bloodier than this one. Whether you’re on its side or fighting against it, the current Iranian regime has never valued human life.

That’s because the rulers of the Islamic republic think of “the people” as property. Once again, over the past few weeks the Iranian people have shown they are anything but. Standing up against that old and failed proposition is valiant and should be supported. But in a moment where there is no clear alternative, it’s also incredibly dangerous.

Ultimately, whether to take those risks or not is up to the people of Iran. So, too, is deciding on how to govern themselves in the future.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/12/02/iran-future-change-is-local/

 

 
Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iran regime may have killed over 1000 including over a dozen children:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-iran-protests-usa/u-s-says-iran-may-have-killed-more-than-1000-in-recent-protests-idUSKBN1Y926W

And the world still remains silent and Europeans continue to prostitute themselves to murderous regime. Maybe Except Trump Administration:

https://globalnews.ca/news/6259905/iran-protests-deaths-trump-administration/

Edited by CITIZEN_2015

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...