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Canada's Refugee System in Chaos


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In my view, you've won the award for most reflexively reactionary comment of the day. And it's pretty uninformed as well. We know of course that slinging the "R" word has become a common form of ideol

The sound of right-wing racist angst is such sweet music to my ears. I'm just so so proud of my human race - puts a real lump in my throat.

When the Conservatives were in power - Harper and his boys were always the "mean spirited" bunch. Conservatives are always depicted that way. They took those lumps from the Left all through their 10 y

4 hours ago, Dougie93 said:

You only turn into a Brazil if you don't have the rule of law, so it's turning into a mini-Brazil now, but not because of the immigrants, rather because the Liberal Party of Canada is the only real state here for all intents and purposes, and it is a mafia state which operates lawlessly.

The hyperbole is silly and detracts from whatever message you're trying to deliver.

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45 minutes ago, Argus said:

The hyperbole is silly and detracts from whatever message you're trying to deliver.

I merely submit my ideas to the market and let the market decide, but going by the terms of this Invision forum, my community reputation is "excellent", which is likely not a qualitative assessment, but it probably means people are reading it, which means it is  getting to market.

But moreover, there is also the markets beyond, as when you are posting on a internet forum, you are publishing to the internet, world wide, publishing a book in effect.   This is how I choose to write my book.  You can write what you like in your book, you only appear in my book where I quote you. /shrugs

Edited by Dougie93
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Bear in mind,  these forums all go into the search engines and your posts are accessible to billions, if even only a tiny number of them hit on your posts in the search reference, that in of itself is a exponentially huge market.

But also, these posts are permanent for all time digitally speaking, which is probably a very long time, potentially ages, as the internet is designed to survive even a nuclear war, which was in fact the purpose of DARPA creating it.

 

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11 hours ago, Zeitgeist said:

I feel the same about the US.

I dunno. There are large parts of the US that are fine to live, with low crime rates, low taxes, and great weather.

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12 minutes ago, Argus said:

I dunno. There are large parts of the US that are fine to live, with low crime rates, low taxes, and great weather.

I have many relatives, including two siblings, who live in the U.S. and by all reports they are for the most part happy, prosperous and safe. I sometimes wonder why so many Canadians develop such a reflexively negative view of our American neighbors? Is it merely insecurity or is it envy? Of course, Canadians have a legitimate gripe where the U.S. government's often overbearing behavior is concerned, but, by-and-large, the U.S. is a country and society similar to ours in many respects, at least for English-speaking Canadians. We could once boast of our health care model as a Canadian advantage but this is an increasingly laughable distinction, at least in Ontario. I suspect that if Canada were to go down the tubes, which is a real possibility given our feckless leadership, the U.S. would remain the most practical and preferred option for most Canadians just as it's been throughout the past century and a half.

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Just now, turningrite said:

I have many relatives, including two siblings, who live in the U.S. and by all reports they are for the most part happy, prosperous and safe. I sometimes wonder why so many Canadians develop such a reflexively negative view of our American neighbors? Is it merely insecurity or is it envy?

It's television, especially the cop shows and dramas which depict all the violent crime in inner cities. But for the most part, the crime of the inner cities is in the inner cities. The crime rate in 'white' areas is fairly low and often comparable to crime rates in Canada. Likewise there are some areas fixated on guns and religion, but that's mostly not the urban areas but the boonies. Even the big cities in Texas are far less conservative than the countryside. Most Canadians would probably be quite happy in Austin, for example, to say nothing of the likes of Portland or Seattle.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I know everyone is shocked, SHOCKED that the Liberals' claim that border crossings is slowing turns out to be untrue.

The illegal crossings come and go from the news, perhaps leading people to believe that the issue itself comes and goes. That when it’s out of the headlines that means the crossings themselves are gone. Not so. For the past two years, they’ve remained constant.

https://torontosun.com/news/national/illegal-crossings-did-not-in-fact-drop-off-in-2018-new-year-end-numbers-reveal

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14 hours ago, Argus said:

I know everyone is shocked, SHOCKED that the Liberals' claim that border crossings is slowing turns out to be untrue.

The illegal crossings come and go from the news, perhaps leading people to believe that the issue itself comes and goes. That when it’s out of the headlines that means the crossings themselves are gone. Not so. For the past two years, they’ve remained constant.

https://torontosun.com/news/national/illegal-crossings-did-not-in-fact-drop-off-in-2018-new-year-end-numbers-reveal

The Trudeau government knows this issue could be problematic for it in an election year so is apparently trying to generate the impression that things are under control. I've been startled at the degree to which MSM outlets are giving the government a free pass on this. Toronto, for instance, which is experiencing a period of brutal weather after a mild start to winter, is now facing a growing and tragic homelessness crisis. According to one report I heard on a TV news broadcast this week, the size of the chronic homeless population has increased by about 40 percent over the past three or four years. Yet, in the coverage of the homelessness crisis, news outlets no longer seem to link the lack of affordable and/or emergency housing to the influx of newcomers even though this link was made during the initial phase of the Tweet-generated "irregular" migrant fiasco.

P.S. In its lead editorial this morning, the Toronto Star did note near the end of a long analysis that refugee claimants now occupy 40 percent of Toronto's emergency shelter beds.

Edited by turningrite
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13 hours ago, turningrite said:

P.S. In its lead editorial this morning, the Toronto Star did note near the end of a long analysis that refugee claimants now occupy 40 percent of Toronto's emergency shelter beds.

Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson is making another play for federal funding to fix the city’s emergency housing system.

In a letter dated December 20, 2018, Watson tells Jean Yves Duclos, the federal minister of families, children and social development, that the majority of the city’s current emergency housing struggle is caused by the influx of asylum seekers from the United States.

“The City of Ottawa is unable to meet the demands of vulnerable families in our community for safe, adequate emergency shelter services,” the letter obtained by 580 CFRA reads.

Watson said shelter staff have been “turning families away” because of the increased demand - forcing families to live in cars and churches across the city.

The city has received 584 emergency housing placement requests from asylum seekers coming from the United States as of November 30 of last year. The majority of these requests are coming from families.

https://ottawa.ctvnews.ca/ottawa-mayor-jim-watson-pressures-feds-to-help-vulnerable-emergency-housing-system-1.4264241

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55 minutes ago, Argus said:

Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson is making another play for federal funding to fix the city’s emergency housing system.

In a letter dated December 20, 2018, Watson tells Jean Yves Duclos, the federal minister of families, children and social development, that the majority of the city’s current emergency housing struggle is caused by the influx of asylum seekers from the United States.

“The City of Ottawa is unable to meet the demands of vulnerable families in our community for safe, adequate emergency shelter services,” the letter obtained by 580 CFRA reads.

Watson said shelter staff have been “turning families away” because of the increased demand - forcing families to live in cars and churches across the city.

The city has received 584 emergency housing placement requests from asylum seekers coming from the United States as of November 30 of last year. The majority of these requests are coming from families.

The link between the homelessness problem and "irregular" migration in some of Canada's large cities is so obvious that it's difficult to fathom any effort to suppress the connection. But higher immigration levels, combined with influxes of temporary foreign workers and foreign students, have in general had broadly negative impacts on housing affordability in Canada's larger cities. The price of rental housing in Toronto, for instance, has been constantly bid up by increased demand, mainly due to immigration and foreign workers and students, over the past decade or more. In the very ordinary housing complex in which I live, rents for new tenants have risen by at least 50 percent over the past decade. And Ontario's bizarre "above guideline" rent increase system has been used by landlords to force rents up for sitting tenants at rates higher than the inflation level. So, landlords are scooping up the cash on both ends without much if any effort on the part of government to sustain any semblance of affordable private market rents. In my complex, many long-term neighbours, including seniors, have simply moved, some to areas outside of Toronto. I'll tell any candidate who tries to tell me at election time that they actually care about housing affordability without being willing to address the immigration issue that they're lying.

Edited by turningrite
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The issue is simply that the government  intervenes by socialist rubric to suppress profit taking in real estate, then there is less incentive to build, so now there is a housing shortage.

Not that I'm complaining mind you, I've profited mightily from it, by OODA loop, tactical alignment with the interests of the Liberal plantation aristocracy which is also profiting mightily from it.

The money is simply not in building houses, the money is in the speculation generated by the Liberals to their own interests.

Edited by Dougie93
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15 minutes ago, Dougie93 said:

The issue is simply that the government  intervenes by socialist rubric to suppress profit taking in real estate, then there is less incentive to build, so now there is a housing shortage.

Not that I'm complaining mind you, I've profited mightily from it, by OODA loop, tactical alignment with the interests of the Liberal plantation aristocracy which is also profiting mightily from it.

The money is simply not in building houses, the money is in the speculation generated by the Liberals to their own interests.

Other than for your first sentence, I agree with much of this. The housing shortage in Toronto, where I live, is one generated mainly by artificially-generated and sustained demand and not one of supply per se. Also, private sector investment has been displaced from the traditional rental housing sector to the condo development sector, where quick profits are more easily and quickly made. Governments could have used taxation tools to address some of this problem, however there's been little willingness on the part of the traditional mainstream parties to do so. And, most importantly, immigration policy could and should have been adjusted in such a fashion as to ameliorate negative market implications, which have on the other side of the coin been a boon for speculators and profiteers. Part of the problem, of course, is that Canada doesn't recognize housing as a social or human right despite the fact that international obligations appear to suggest we are bound to do so. The private market, as it turns out, can't be expected to effectively solve social problems, and especially ones created by government policy, but if the political will exists to do so it can be incentivized to avoid making such problems worse.

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You can't stop the immigration, that's a fool's errand, if the Americans can't do it, Canada has no chance, which is the case.

All you can do is be Milton Friedman's Hong Kong, take the white knuckled grip off the wheel and let the market find a price for things, then the profit interest will do the rest and fill the void with products and services priced to the market by the market for the market.

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