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Swedish parliamentary elections

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Next Sunday it is very interesting to see if there is a lot of uproar by the the so-called good people at the inevitable success of the Swedish Democrats in the elections in Sweden.

Namely, it is a cliffhanger. They may even become the largest party but no chance of being in the government as all the rest gang up on them.

Sweden would be without a doubt the best place to live on this planet given their history and their wealth hadn't they ruined it all through a totally insane immigration policy which has almost destroyed the nation.

This election is the last chance for Sweden to get back on its feet. The sverigedemokraterna, namely Swedish Democrats, are doing well in the polls. But they are also the most hated party in Sweden because of their alleged anti-immigration agenda. Most hated? Yes. But still possibly the most liked too.

It will be interesting to see what happens on Sunday.

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The SD rose from 13% to 17.5%, which is good but nowhere near what was expected of them. The social democrats remain the largest party but two traditional blocs are equal in terms of seats. Therefore a total impasse. Could trigger new elections.

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16 hours ago, -TSS- said:

The SD rose from 13% to 17.5%, which is good but nowhere near what was expected of them. The social democrats remain the largest party but two traditional blocs are equal in terms of seats. Therefore a total impasse. Could trigger new elections.

 

Doesn't Sweden tend to govern by coalition? So any increase in the share by the SD should be a worry to those who think they rule the roost.

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There are two traditional blocs in Swedish politics; the red-green bloc consisting of the social democrats, the left-party and the greens and the other bloc is the centre-right bloc consisting of the conservatives, the liberals, the centre party and the christian democrats. Before the SD emerged to the scene one of the two blocs always got a majority of the votes.

Not any more. Last night's result means that the bloc-politics must end in order to have a functioning government as neither bloc wants to rely on the support of the SD.

It is noteworthy that as the traditional party of power the social democrats had their worst result in 100 years but yet the result was considered a relief for them as SD was expected to get more than 17.5%.

 

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12 hours ago, DogOnPorch said:

 

Doesn't Sweden tend to govern by coalition? So any increase in the share by the SD should be a worry to those who think they rule the roost.

It's my understanding that coalitions are the norm in Sweden as it the case in many other European countries. The rise of an explicitly anti-immigration party in what is often considered one of the world's most tolerant and prosperous countries does suggest that right-wing populism is now becoming an ingrained reality in Western politics. Swedes who were interviewed on a news broadcast today seemed surprised that this is happening in their country. But one woman, more apparently introspective than the others, said she believed the growing support for this kind of politics is a logical result of politicians not listening to public concerns about immigrant integration. The test now will be to see whether the mainstream parties are willing to address these concerns in an open and forthright fashion rather than with the haughtily dismissive elitism so often characteristic among many traditional parties in the West. How far behind progressive Sweden can meek and mild Canada be? Our time will come. How can it not?

Edited by turningrite

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I have a question about the way parliamentary democracy works there. If you end up the largest party, even if it's a plurality but not majority (the most seats, but still <50% of them), isn't it typical for you (the leader of said party) to end up the PM? Or can a bunch of little parties gang up and form a bloc that excludes the largest party from government as long as the proposed bloc of smaller parties command >50% of the seats?

And who does the actual appointment of the new PM? Who has to certify officially that said coalition is valid? The king of sweden? (Like with the GG of Canada)

Also, how do they vote in Sweden? I wouldn't think it is first past the post, is it?

Edited by JamesHackerMP

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