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Ford-Kavanaugh Sexual Assault Allegation


WestCanMan

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6 hours ago, Wilber said:

The Republicans set the bar with Garland.

The entire Obama administration saw politics choked out.  The Republican party simply refused to do politics, pledging to tear down Obamacare in vote after vote.  And once they had power, it turned out they couldn't do it anyway.  A complete waste of legislative throughput.  Then they decided to elect the guy who spent years saying Obama was a secret African.  

This trial of Kavanaugh is more proof that the #1 function of American politics is entertainment, even though there are great problems to solve.  

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7 hours ago, Hal 9000 said:

The Dems did alright, they were pretty close to proving that a college kids drink too much.

and fart  :rolleyes:

IMO Sen. Feinstein needs to step down, had she acted in good faith this wouldn't have happened, it would've been handled quietly; but she deliberately withheld information in order to stall a vote until after mid terms using both Ford and Kavanaugh as pawns in her political games.  That was evil.

Both sides lost,  and the Democrats really did screw America, everyone. 

 

  

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11 minutes ago, Don Jonas said:

If Kavanaugh's speech was intended to show he isn't an entitled frat boy with anger issues and a tendency to avoid telling the truth, he failed miserably. The crocodile tears were a nice touch, but saying Ford is part of a grand Democratic conspiracy showed him to be a real slimeball.

 

No...any objective view of the witness testimony would find both credible if not compelling.   What has failed miserably is the confirmation process itself, for partisan political reasons.

As for him being a "frat boy", I went to college/university in same Maryland area in the 1970's, and the official circumstances for "parties" were just as Kavanaugh described.   There were many all male or female schools that purposely held what were called "mixers", which invited students from surrounding schools.   Women (or men) would be transported by bus to these events, ostensibly to teach social skills !   My favourite "parties" were sponsored by Notre Dame of Maryland University (all female undergraduates at the time).

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10 hours ago, Michael Hardner said:

1. Disgusting ?  Why ?  They want to win, so why should they not use a tool at their disposal.  Their opposition is Trump, so saying they're disgusting is kind of like saying dog shit doesn't taste good, ie. it misses the point.

2. STINK ! :D  Again, it's Trump they're opposing...

3. Politics is now entertainment, and nothing but.  Why do you think they put it on opposite Soap Operas ?  Daytime Television, so don't think about it too much.

Thank you. I think you've added points as to why it's so disgusting.

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On 9/26/2018 at 12:18 PM, turningrite said:

It's my understanding that the FBI vets all SCOTUS nominees and as this allegation has arisen since his nomination the agency has jurisdiction over any ensuing investigation. Otherwise, this would likely be delegated to local authorities. I actually think the more recent allegation concerning the nominee exposing his - well, you know - might be the more serious matter as he was in college at the time rather than in high school. A lot of this stuff sounds like frat boy behavior. It's scary how it can come back to haunt people years later, making one wonder how many could stand up to the scrutiny to which high profile appointees for such positions are now subjected? Maybe Kavanaugh should give Patrick Brown a quick call. Patrick certainly found out how quickly one's supposed friends can abandon a colleague in the #metoo era, where one is presumed guilty before one is permitted to prove one's innocence.

I imagine there are a plethora of men and women who look back on their younger years with some if not a lot of regret for their actions.  That it should define who they are now is specious at best. How they have lived their lives since that time is what should count - not unsupported allegations from over three decades ago that had they been properly reported at the time may very well have been found to be without merit. 

Edited by mowich
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4 minutes ago, mowich said:

I imagine there are a plethora of men and women who look back on their younger years with some if not a lot of regret for their actions.  That is should define who they are now is specious at best. How they have lived their lives since that time is what should count - not unsupported allegations from over three decades ago that had they been properly reported at the time may very well have been found to be without merit. 

We aren’t talking about just anyone. How low do you set the bar for a Supreme Court Justice when it comes to previous behaviour?

Edited by Wilber
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On 9/25/2018 at 5:40 PM, Truth Detector said:

Why would the FBI get involved in a supposed assault 36 years ago?  Why wouldn’t the local authorities handle said investigation?

Good question.  A better one might be why Dr Ford decided to sit on this for so long?  Why did she not come forward now when she had ample opportunity to make her accusations decades ago.  She obviously believes that something happened to her but was it Kavanaugh - I most certainly have my doubts.  I do feel for Dr Ford as she is obviously little more than a pawn in the hands of the Dems and will be discarded as soon as the hearings have ended. 

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1 minute ago, Wilber said:

We aren’t talking about just anyone. How low do you set the bar for a Supreme Court Justice when it comes to previous behaviour?

Alleged behavior - let's get that straight.  Three of the four people who Dr Ford said were there, do not support her testimony.  From all apparent testimony, letters of support from both men and women, Judge Kavanaugh has led an exemplary life as an adult.  To have these unsupported allegations brought up now is nothing more than a sickening effort by the Dems to stall the nomination hearings.  Feinstien should be removed immediately. 

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3 hours ago, Michael Hardner said:

The entire Obama administration saw politics choked out.  The Republican party simply refused to do politics, pledging to tear down Obamacare in vote after vote.  And once they had power, it turned out they couldn't do it anyway.  A complete waste of legislative throughput.  Then they decided to elect the guy who spent years saying Obama was a secret African.  

This trial of Kavanaugh is more proof that the #1 function of American politics is entertainment, even though there are great problems to solve.  

Not long ago, the direction US politics has gone just seemed very sad. Now it just seems pathetic.

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18 minutes ago, Wilber said:

Seeing the way Ford and Kavanaugh handled themselves yesterday, it is hard not to imagine Ford making the better judge. Even tempered, cool, logical. Exact opposites. 

 

 

Reality check:   Judge Brett Kavanaugh is already a jurist for US Court of Appeals for D.C. since 2006.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brett_Kavanaugh

Edited by bush_cheney2004
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13 minutes ago, Wilber said:

Seeing the way Ford and Kavanaugh handled themselves yesterday, it is hard not to imagine Ford making the better judge. Even tempered, cool, logical. Exact opposites. 

 

While I sympathize with Kavanaugh, who's faced a rush to judgment, what I found most off-putting about his appearance yesterday was his open anger and propensity for self-pity. Had he reacted in a more empathetic fashion, acknowledging that given the passage of almost four decades he has little accurate recollection of the events in question but noting too that he was no angel when he was young - as few of us (at least males, if we're honest) were, I think he would have garnered more sympathy. I suspect that in the court of public opinion, and particularly among women, he lost yesterday's round. Of course, the important audience is much smaller and boils down to 3 or 4 undecided senators. I believe that partisan loyalties will win the day here, which is problematic given the prestige and importance of the position Kavanaugh is seeking. I agree with the American Bar Association, which yesterday released a statement supporting a thorough FBI investigation prior to the confirmation vote. Presumably, the ABA is concerned about the legitimacy of the USSC. Kavanaugh needs to win this battle on the basis of evidence, or lack thereof on the other side, rather than partisan math. In this country we've seen that the reputation of the judiciary is increasingly a matter of public debate and the American judicial system has become so politicized to the extent that it's now difficult to think of it as being truly impartial. Can a democracy thrive without an independent judiciary? I suspect not.

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53 minutes ago, turningrite said:

While I sympathize with Kavanaugh, who's faced a rush to judgment, what I found most off-putting about his appearance yesterday was his open anger and propensity for self-pity.

Why would his reaction be any different from anyone who's been abused, screwed and raped?  He's going through hell! 

Some Democrats had even started calling him EVIL - even before they heard both testimonies! 

His right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty has been blatantly TRAMPLED by these people! 

 

He's been gang-raped by the Democrats!   Publicly!  Symbolically!

 

He is in a fight of his life - fighting for his family, his name, his reputation, his career, his legacy........and you expect him to be devoid of any emotions?  

 

 

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Had he reacted in a more empathetic fashion, acknowledging that given the passage of almost four decades he has little accurate recollection of the events in question

Where are you getting that for a fact???   How do you know he has little accurate recollection?

 

 

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but noting too that he was no angel when he was young - as few of us (at least males, if we're honest) were, I think he would have garnered more sympathy.

I don't think he was trying to garner any sympathy.   He was expressing his anger and outrage.....which is only normal.

 

 

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I suspect that in the court of public opinion, and particularly among women, he lost yesterday's round.

I disagree.   Every woman has a father.....a husband.....a son......a brother......a friend.

 

 

 

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Of course, the important audience is much smaller and boils down to 3 or 4 undecided senators. I believe that partisan loyalties will win the day here, which is problematic given the prestige and importance of the position Kavanaugh is seeking. I agree with the American Bar Association, which yesterday released a statement supporting a thorough FBI investigation prior to the confirmation vote. Presumably, the ABA is concerned about the legitimacy of the USSC. Kavanaugh needs to win this battle on the basis of evidence, or lack thereof on the other side, rather than partisan math. In this country we've seen that the reputation of the judiciary is increasingly a matter of public debate and the American judicial system has become so politicized to the extent that it's now difficult to think of it as being truly impartial. Can a democracy thrive without an independent judiciary? I suspect not.

I don't know what the outcome will be at this voting.  

Edited by betsy
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1 hour ago, mowich said:

Good question.  A better one might be why Dr Ford decided to sit on this for so long?  Why did she not come forward now when she had ample opportunity to make her accusations decades ago. 

I'm stunned that people ask that question. 

Most sexual assault incidents are never reported. This is why there is a such a huge shake-up in the Western society and culture at the moment. There is a movement towards finally accepting that it's not okay to sexually abuse others and it's okay to speak up when it's done against you.

This does not mean that everything is black and white. That every accused is Harvey Weinstein. I'm sure we'll find the correct way to deal with this explosive cultural movement. 

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47 minutes ago, bcsapper said:

Given all this, can't he actually be charged?  Then he would definitely have the right to due process.

That would be something, wouldn't it.  His lawyers could take it all the way to the Supreme Court, where he could find himself not guilty!

Maybe, depends on the state.  Cosby could only be charged with one offence because all the others exceeded the statute of limitations. 

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1 hour ago, turningrite said:

I agree with the American Bar Association, which yesterday released a statement supporting a thorough FBI investigation prior to the confirmation vote. Presumably, the ABA is concerned about the legitimacy of the USSC.

Someone needs to be because the politicians aren't.

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