Jump to content
Political Discussion Forums
Sign in to follow this  
JamesHackerMP

Text games of the 80s/90s era

Recommended Posts

I remember playing Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.  I found it very frustrating as I was a one finger typist at the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/26/2018 at 2:40 AM, JamesHackerMP said:

Anyone play these? I used to love them. You had to use your imagination. Was like reading a book you could almost take control of.

Moosehead mud (multi user dungeon). It was a kind of D&D game. There were scores of online versions hosted by various places all using the same basic text and map. It was the forerunner of Worlds of Warcraft. It was all text, but somehow it was extremely energizing. I could spend hours on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

neat!

Zork Zero has some visual elements, but still vastly a text game. (Part of the visual stuff was to prevent software pirates, so they put some stuff in the game you could only get if you read the enclosed materials.)

Edited by JamesHackerMP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, JamesHackerMP said:

neat!

Zork Zero has some visual elements, but still vastly a text game. (Part of the visual stuff was to prevent software pirates, so they put some stuff in the game you could only get if you read the enclosed materials.)

Enclosed materials? That must have been a pro game. Moosehead sled, and the others which used the same text, were largely maintained by enthusiasts of the games. They charged nothing and were maintained by volunteers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2019 at 12:44 PM, Argus said:

Enclosed materials? That must have been a pro game. Moosehead sled, and the others which used the same text, were largely maintained by enthusiasts of the games. They charged nothing and were maintained by volunteers.

Neat.

Yeah, there was a calendar of "The Twelve Flatheads" (i.e., the royal family of the Empire, kind of like the 12 Caesars or something) and some sort of weird map. There was no way to play the game without referring to those things. That way, software pirates were SOL. Some of it was pretty funny.

I bought the apple version of Hitchhiker's Guide. It actually contained a piece of fluff as a joke. (Part of the things you had to figure out involved fluff) and other things. But they weren't necessary to play the game in case you had pirated the software.

 

 

Edited by JamesHackerMP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×