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Robert Greene

Why Are Natives So Entitled?

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I was recently at a Native Reservation, and my friend was wearing a Wyoming T-Shirt. I asked one the natives, if they have ever seen the Midwest. He said, "That place doesn't exit." I said, well the mountains are beautiful, and there's lot's of nice fishing."

He then looked at me, like I need to leave the room. "It's all native land to me."

I was being corrected for saying the word "Wyoming".

When I see university students make land acknowledgements, I get angry. Why do the continue to feed their entitlement?

I remember being in Grade 9, and a girl I like said, this isn't out land. We stole the land, so we don't belong in Canada. Who the [email protected] are they to tell me, I don't belong in the country I was born in?

The hypocrisy pisses me off. They love our technology, but they continue to call us visitors.

If they hate white people so much, why don't they give up the trucks, their boats, their fishing rods, their snowmobiles, their computers, their cellphones, their clothing, and just go live in the forest. If we're so bad, then why don't they boycott western technology? They can still hunt and build houses like their ancestors.

Maybe they can stop asking for welfare, schools, transfer payments, aircraft rides, ambulances, hospitals. All the [email protected], white people have to pay for. Why should the next generation have to break there backs, to pay rent on a treaty they never signed? I wasn't around 300 years ago. So if they want all our shit, then they need to start paying some taxes.

If they want to make a statement, then leave the reserves, and start building homes in the forest. Just don't continue to say we don't belong, when we're the ones paying for all your Shid.

It think we've bent over backwards far too long, and their sense of entitlement is getting old.

Edited by Robert Greene

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I wasn't around 300 years ago. I'm not responsible for European colonization. I'm responsible for paying taxes, so when some drug addict tells me i'm not paying enough rent, I get angry.

If it wasn't for us, the first nations would become a third world country. We're the one paying for most of their crap, while they let their kids sit around half the day, drunk or smoking pot.

If they want to continue to call us cheap, lets stop sending money. Let them work for their own roads, and housing, and then maybe they will clean themselves up.

The hard working Canadians deserve a decent pensions, but instead we got to send billions to remote reserves.

The very least they can do, is say thank you.

Edited by Robert Greene

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7 hours ago, Robert Greene said:

I wasn't around 300 years ago. I'm not responsible for European colonization. I'm responsible for paying taxes, so when some drug addict tells me i'm not paying enough rent, I get angry.

If it wasn't for us, the first nations would become a third world country. We're the one paying for most of their crap, while they let their kids sit around half the day, drunk or smoking pot.

If they want to continue to call us cheap, lets stop sending money. Let them work for their own roads, and housing, and then maybe they will clean themselves up.

The hard working Canadians deserve a decent pensions, but instead we got to send billions to remote reserves.

The very least they can do, is say thank you.

The very least we can do is say "Thank you" that we live on their land, when we haven't finished paying for that privilege yet, and we live off the proceeds of resources from their land (oil, mining, forestry, etc) that we haven't finished paying for yet.

Reality. 

Edited by jacee

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It comes down to teaching people how to fish instead of giving people fish.  While I’m extremely sympathetic to the children born in remote reserves with deteriorating housing, and I think that help is needed, ultimately I don’t think transferring money from taxpayers to non taxpayers is sustainable or healthy.  I think the smartest answer, the only sensible answer, and likely the one that won’t be accepted, is as follows:  

1.  All Indigenous residents within their communities, whether territorial or reserve, decide whether to privatize their land or keep it a reserve.  

2.  Privatized lands can be sold on the open market by the owners and there are no further obligations of government towards these property owners, except that the Indigenous status cards are retained and respected.  

3.  Those communities that choose to retain reserve/non-privatized status develop a transition to self-sustainability plan if they want any further non-Indigenous assistance apart from the benefits inherent with status and residence on the reserve, such as not having to pay taxes.  What will come by way of additional money through the completion of a self-sustainability plan will be one-time capital funding for improvements to housing and water treatment, plus training for the long-term maintenance of building and water infrastructure.  Such funding and training will ensure the sustainable maintenance of essential housing and utilities.  

4. The federal government should download Indigenous education to the provinces, as well as any and all federal health spending.  Provinces and school boards will have to make hard decisions about how much transportation will be provided and where it is reasonable to locate schools with regard to small remote communities.  Such small remote communities will have to make decisions about whether to move to larger communities for the sake of services.  Such choices would factor into decision making in the community over whether to privatize land.  

5.  Part of the sustainability plan will include a plan for economic growth within the Indigenous territory/reserve.  It may include resource development and other forms of business development.  It would also include a form of internal collection of funds or taxation to pay for infrastructure capital projects such as new roads and the maintenance of utilities such as water, housing and so forth.  

6.  After the one-time payouts, enshrine in law that, apart from money from the existing trust funds with their annuities and the existing annual transfer of government tax revenue to Indigenous Affairs (adjusted annually for inflation), no increases in funding will be approved.  

7.  Land claims will continue through the courts.  Proven exclusive and continuous use by the group making the claim will continue to be the burden of proof, and in such cases, title will be granted, though such land may also be privatized and sold if the owners so choose.  

8.  In areas that have been settled by non-Indigenous people, or where there is conflict between groups claiming exclusive and continuous use, Crown and private title will always be protected.  No one has the right to take privately owned land or demand payment for it, whether from private individuals or from government (the general tax paying public)

9.  The federal government and National Energy Board retains control over interprovincial infrastructure such as the building of pipelines, rail lines, and major highways.  As always consultations for the location and environmental impacts of such infrastructure with the local communities must be provided, but the final decisions rest with the federal government.  Territories or reserves may choose to separate from Canada, but doing so ends all treaty and other obligations from the government of Canada.  There is no guarantee of open borders for such independent territories.  Reserves/Indigenous territories within Canada are still subject to federal criminal law and both provincial and federal courts.  

I think that instituting such policies would settle the score.  Not all Indigenous would support it just as not all non-Indigenous would support it, which is why Indigenous communities would have to come to a consensus within their communities without outside interference, just as taxpayers would decide through their votes.  

In the long run, for both economic and cultural prosperity, I think for many Indigenous it would make sense to leave “the Rez”, privatize land, and participate in the wider Canadian society.  However, some reserves and territories are thriving.  They are self-sustaining and self-determining.  Good for them.  If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.  For those who feel their communities are broken and dysfunctional, there has to be a way out.  We need a long-term, sustainable plan where people are in control of their destiny.  In the end these decisions have to come from Indigenous peoples.  I wonder sometimes if some people, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, want to maintain the problems rather than fix them.  

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I'd rather fan and fuel right-wing conservative angst and anger until their stupid heads explode.

It's funny listening to them whine about the burden they bear.

 

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14 hours ago, Robert Greene said:

I wasn't around 300 years ago. I'm not responsible for European colonization. I'm responsible for paying taxes....

Our government is responsible for the consequences of colonialism which of course requires taxes.

The very least they can do, is say thank you.

Has anyone thanked them for their continent?

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3 minutes ago, eyeball said:

I'd rather fan and fuel right-wing conservative angst and anger until their stupid heads explode.

It's funny listening to them whine about the burden they bear.

 

It’s important to find a sustainable solution that the majority of Indigenous and non-Indigenous would back.  The left propose giveaways that are immediately declared insufficient by the recipients.  I just listened to an Indigenous person slam the Liberals for setting aside 4.5 billion in new money towards Indigenous affairs.  It’s never enough.  The right will give as little as possible, ignore the problem, and blame the left for mismanagement.  Of course the problem doesn’t go away on its own. Apology parades provide more opportunities to revel in the misery and do nothing.  We need a sustainable plan for once and all.  

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3 hours ago, eyeball said:

I'd rather fan and fuel right-wing conservative angst and anger until their stupid heads explode.

It's funny listening to them whine about the burden they bear.

 

Now that's true irony. Seeing you post about others whining when I've seen many posts from you over the years where you whined about the fisheries and their regulations. What a burden they placed on you.

I'd rather fan and fuel left-wing Liberal angst and anger until their stupid heads explode.

See what I did there?

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27 minutes ago, AngusThermopyle said:

Now that's true irony. Seeing you post about others whining when I've seen many posts from you over the years where you whined about the fisheries and their regulations. What a burden they placed on you.

You've never considered the burden that the mal-governance of other Canadians places on you? Its funny how the lack of surprise takes the edge off the irony.

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12 hours ago, Zeitgeist said:

After the one-time payouts ...

No government is ever going to put that in their budget!  Lol  

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7 hours ago, eyeball said:

Our government is responsible for the consequences of colonialism which of course requires taxes.

 

 

Has anyone thanked them for their continent?

Uh..."our government"  has never been a colonial power, you need to deal with the slimey limeys for that one.

"Their" continent?   Where was the national government?   Where were the title deeds?  What was here was a couple hundred thousand heathens fighting each other for whatever reasons.  There was hardly some cohesive entity - just some loose and constantly shifting alliances of convenience.

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I think it's high time, we stop apologizing and feeding their sense of entitlement.

Give them a 12 month warning. They can either move to the cities, or they're on their own.

If they want their own land, then lets succeed. They can run their own Third World Country.

Maybe a two state solution. Let them have the territories, and will keep the provinces.

You go to the reserves, and half of them are drunk or on drugs. We're foolish enough to pay for it.

Edited by Robert Greene

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21 minutes ago, cannuck said:

Uh..."our government"  has never been a colonial power, you need to deal with the slimey limeys for that one.

Okay. Doesn't change the fact our government got left holding the bag of slime.

Quote

"Their" continent?   Where was the national government?   Where were the title deeds?

In their future.

Quote

What was here was a couple hundred thousand heathens fighting each other for whatever reasons.  There was hardly some cohesive entity - just some loose and constantly shifting alliances of convenience.

 What followed, however inconveniently, was the evolution of a country based on rules and laws that often rule in indigenous favour.

Ironically you'll need to deal with a limey to do anything about the basis for our laws.

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They keep crying about land. We need to make them an offer. We should give them land. They can have their own country, but don't ask for anything more.

It will be interesting to watch them run their own country, when all their citizens are exempt from taxes.

Edited by Robert Greene

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http://www.ufn.ca/our-government/taxation/
 

Quote

 

With our Final Agreement, we, the Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ no longer take direction from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada or the Province of British Columbia. We once again have full responsibility for our land, our assets, and our governance.
 
Why taxes?
As negotiated in the Treaty, our own government is charged with managing and protecting our resources for future generations. In order to fund this important work and build our Nation, the Treaty has granted the  the power to generate revenue by collecting taxes.

The implementation of taxation will be phased in over time. This will allow us to adjust to a new and exciting time in our history.
Our story is for us to write. And control over taxation is important to an independent and prosperous future for our peoples.

 

GST & PST  |  May 1, 2019
Starting May 1, 2019, Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ citizens will begin to pay GST and PST.

 

Property Tax  |  January 1, 2024
Citizens who own houses and/or land on Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ Treaty Settlement Lands will begin paying property taxes no later than January 1, 2014. “Citizens” means those on the enrolment register of the Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ – Ucluelet First Nation.

 

Income Tax  |  January 1, 2024
Starting January 1, 2024, Citizens will pay income taxes.

 

 

It'll be interesting when natives struggling under Post Confederation Treaties decide its time to renegotiate.

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