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GostHacked

Time to Ban AirBNB - It's creating a housing crisis

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On 5/10/2019 at 3:50 PM, jacee said:

Do your own research.

I asked Eyeball as he would have more knowledge on that matter. 

 

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On 5/10/2019 at 6:17 PM, eyeball said:

Anyone else want to ban capitalism?

How about just regulating it?

Ok. HOW do you regulate something that flies so low under the radar? Regulation should have happened from the start when AirBnB came into existence.

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On 5/10/2019 at 3:46 PM, jacee said:

You have provided no evidence of that. 

Ban the predatory developers and realtors.

But what I do with my own rooms is not your business.

I have provided plenty of evidence  for it.   But I can throw it back at you and say 'go do your own research'.

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2 hours ago, GostHacked said:

I have provided plenty of evidence  for it.   But I can throw it back at you and say 'go do your own research'.

You claimed that Airbnb is causing shortages in long term rentals. I just asked for your evidence supporting that claim. You haven't provided any yet. 

Edited by jacee

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5 hours ago, GostHacked said:

Ok. HOW do you regulate something that flies so low under the radar? Regulation should have happened from the start when AirBnB came into existence.

Get a better radar - better oversight of the economy in other words, and deep oversight in certain industries.  If the entire economy had been properly regulated before AirBnB came into existence it would have known how to behave properly in the first place.

How we regulate probably isn't as important as the question WHY we need to regulate in the first place.  By not properly addressing why we're left with forever approaching the most common economic problem, i.e. people that are left behind, dealt out of the game or pushed off the playing field, in a piecemeal manner. We spend inordinate amounts of time scratching our heads over how without any guidance stemming from having answered why.

We have a rather vague and therefore weak sense that why is to promote a more fair and just economy but...I'm sure you can also hear the usual suspects filling up with bile and penning opinions laced with lol's and references to Stalin as we speak.

This issue sure seems to push hard on buttons on all sides rich and poor alike.  I'd rather see it pushing hardest on governments myself because I think they're getting a massive free pass on having to do anything about the perennial problem of affordable housing by pretending like just about everyone else that its a brand new problem brought about by short term rentals that can be solved by simply banning them.  Like I said, its completely piecemeal and without any real reason other than short-term political expediency.

Edited by eyeball

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17 hours ago, jacee said:

You claimed that Airbnb is causing shortages in long term rentals. I just asked for your evidence supporting that claim. You haven't provided any yet. 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/fairbnb-report-short-term-rentals-entire-homes-lost-1.4971332

Quote

A new report suggests 6,500 homes could be added to Toronto's housing market if the home-sharing platform Airbnb were to comply with proposed city rules on short-term rentals.

Those rules are under appeal, and currently, the city cannot enforce the rules until the appeal at the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal is heard. City council passed the rules in December 2017. 

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/vancouver-airbnb-housing-market-effect-1.5026028

Quote

Hundreds of landlords are still flouting the law almost a year after Vancouver introduced rules around short-term rentals, says a housing advocate who is unconvinced of the bylaw's clout.

City bylaws introduced  April 19 require hosts to obtain a business licence and state that a landlord can only rent out their principal residence, or, if the residence is already rented long term, the tenant may operate a short-term rental with the owner's permission.

The initiative was the city's response to short-term vacation rentals wreaking havoc with housing for long-term renters.

But Vancouver housing advocate Rohana Rezel, a candidate for council in the last municipal election, says a quick scan of 4,000 Vancouver units listed on the site showed at least 800 in clear violation of the bylaws.

https://www.governing.com/columns/public-money/gov-airbnb-affordable-housing.html

Quote

The report contends that the number of vacant and available apartments in New York City would increase by 10 percent if “commercial profiteer” listings -- listings that are booked several times per month and listed for at least three months per year by someone who advertises multiple apartments on Airbnb -- were returned to the rental market. Presumably, rents would drop by an offsetting amount, making for significantly more affordable shelter for low- and moderate-income families.

https://www.realtrends.com/blog/economist-warns-airbnb-rentals-impact-housing-crisis/

https://bc.ctvnews.ca/airbnb-draining-rental-housing-supply-in-canada-s-three-biggest-cities-study-1.3537868

https://globalnews.ca/video/4832491/airbnb-contributing-to-toronto-housing-crisis-report

That should be enough. If you need more evidence, I can easily put that here.

 

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3 hours ago, GostHacked said:

Thank you. I still think your knee-jerk "ban Airbnb" response is not appropriate. It's important to assess where the problems really lie, and address that.  

Toronto, Vancouver and New York City, the most expensive and difficult cities for housing. And the most susceptible to predatory developers and realtors renting multiple STR purpose-bought or -built homes and units.

I think the suggestion of only allowing STR's for your principal residence is quite reasonable. Owner's with multiple listings in different locations certainly should be limited and regulated. It's tricky, though, because companies still  skirt around it by having multiple staff listed as 'hosts' on Airbnb.  I think the "commercial profiteer" label for them is appropriate.  

 

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56 minutes ago, jacee said:

Thank you. I still think your knee-jerk "ban Airbnb" response is not appropriate. It's important to assess where the problems really lie, and address that.  

Toronto, Vancouver and New York City, the most expensive and difficult cities for housing. And the most susceptible to predatory developers and realtors renting multiple STR purpose-bought or -built homes and units.

I think the suggestion of only allowing STR's for your principal residence is quite reasonable. Owner's with multiple listings in different locations certainly should be limited and regulated. It's tricky, though, because companies still  skirt around it by having multiple staff listed as 'hosts' on Airbnb.  I think the "commercial profiteer" label for them is appropriate.  

 

This is also an issue where residential and commercial is mixed within a residential building. Meaning different building codes and even getting into zoning issues.  Residential is just that ,, residential. Which does not include hotels, or bed and breakfasts. 

Also these problems I have stated go back to 2015. So if it was a problem then, it's a bigger problem now.  So even if regulation comes in, HOW would that be applied to these places? And how would enforcement of such regulations take place?  I am all for regulation here too, but that means a city is going to need to spend time and money on making new regulations and then money and time and labour on enforcing.

 

 

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2 hours ago, GostHacked said:

This is also an issue where residential and commercial is mixed within a residential building. Meaning different building codes and even getting into zoning issues.  Residential is just that ,, residential. Which does not include hotels, or bed and breakfasts. 

Also these problems I have stated go back to 2015. So if it was a problem then, it's a bigger problem now.  So even if regulation comes in, HOW would that be applied to these places? And how would enforcement of such regulations take place?  I am all for regulation here too, but that means a city is going to need to spend time and money on making new regulations and then money and time and labour on enforcing.

I can't answer those questions. It may be different in each municipality. Ask your municipality how they will regulate and enforce. Complaints from nearby residents play a large role up to now. 

Keep in mind that cities are also  benefiting from drawing more people - business and holiday visitors who spend money in communities - so cities are not trying to ban Airbnb, just regulate it to reduce residents' complaints. MOST complaints relate to the commercial privateers, eg condo buildings with too many STR units, and too many complaints from other residents.

Edited by jacee

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1 hour ago, GostHacked said:

I am all for regulation here too, but that means a city is going to need to spend time and money on making new regulations and then money and time and labour on enforcing.

Deeper oversight is the key but especially of the process of coming up with regulations.  There will be lobbyists to keep an eye on and if UBER is anything to go by there will be public officials with economic/financial links to the industry being regulated - take councillors who own multiple very expensive taxi licences for example.  I have a hard time imagining there aren't financial linkages between developers/realtors/and elected officials in the bigger cities mentioned above.  No doubt money launderers in the real estate industry are up to their eyeballs in this too.

I've seen this playbook before where moral panic, official scrambling and the overhaul of an industry resulted in lots of little people being pushed out and the biggest players come out controlling even more opportunity than they had before.

So what does or could deep oversight come to mean?  How about home inspections, CCTV coupled with AI, host/resident compliance software, biometrically keyed entryways...we have home inspectors and host compliance software where I live.  I don't buy the excuse that municipal governments don't have the means to regulate this, I suspect many simply don't want to. 

Red pill or Blue?    

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https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/ghost-hotel-byward-market-crime-1.5143891

The other side of this that many are not seeing, and I saw this happening in Toronto when I was there. A lot of crime related to AirBnB ghost hotels. There was a shooting incident in another AirBnB only a block from where I was staying. Another relating in a death in another part of town in another AirBnB.

Quote

It's really frustrating that the neighbours are the ones who have to monitor the situation and try to enforce some sort of decent behaviour," resident Kate Laing said.

 

"The Airbnb owners make a lot of profit on their properties, and yet it's the city who is paying the money to have the police and bylaw attend on a regular basis."

Laing, who has lived on St. Andrew Street for 21 years, said she's noticed a spike in crime since the short-term rentals moved in.

and

Quote

She described another incident in late April in which neighbours called bylaw because of all the parking violations near one of the buildings. That led to an investigation into prostitution, Laing said.

"The only people going into the property were single men going in, in rotation."

Quote

Crime up near rentals

Coun. Mathieu Fleury, whose Rideau-Vanier ward includes St. Andrew Street, confirmed the city has been seeing an increase in crime around short-term rental properties, particularly in the Lowertown/ByWard Market area.

He said of the about 2,000 units for rent on Airbnb in Ottawa, 600 of them are in those neighbourhoods.

"We're seeing a lot of neighbourhood complaints relating to noise, most recently relating to prostitution and drugs," Fleury said.

 

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We're seeing a lot of neighbourhood complaints relating to noise,

Then do something about it.  Anyone have a rooster for a neighbour?  The one next door to us started crowing at 4:00 this morning, days are getting longer I suppose. The regional district says its hands are tied - apparently we can't have a noise bylaw because we don't have a bylaw enforcement officer.  The rooster and chickens are free range and routinely wander into our yard.  At least 20 chickens have been killed by neighbourhood dogs in the last year, we have a couple piles of feathers where they got the last ones. And now wolves have been seen on our street.  Our neighbour says she needs the rooster to protect the chickens and produce the eggs she sells... I know, I know you don't need a rooster for eggs....

Why is it that local governments in our society can't do more to regulate people's economic behaviour when it becomes disruptive to neighbours?

It seems we have no choice but to take our neighbour to court to seek a remedy.  No doubt we'll face some sort of tit for tat complaint and so it goes.

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