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Mike Utinne

If Europe and Canada are both morally superior, why do they not stop the evils of the US?

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Is it not the duty of morally superior or noble people to stop evil as well?

 

This whole "the US is too powerful to be stopped" is unacceptable, if that's your first response.

 

Has it not occurred to you that if you let them do evil things now, they will continue to do evil things..... forever? 

 

So, Europeans of the world and Canadians as well..... you love to criticize their foreign policy, their invasions, their murdering of peoples all over the world........... explain to me why you haven't done anything to stop them?

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8 hours ago, Mike Utinne said:

So, Europeans of the world and Canadians as well..... you love to criticize their foreign policy, their invasions, their murdering of peoples all over the world........... explain to me why you haven't done anything to stop them?

Because we're with them.

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15 hours ago, Mike Utinne said:

So, Europeans of the world and Canadians as well..... you love to criticize their foreign policy, their invasions, their murdering of peoples all over the world........... explain to me why you haven't done anything to stop them?

Because, guess what you rainbow-flag-hippie, the World is mean and nasty as much as it is good to its core. Everyone partakes in these conspiracies and murders around the world. The Chinese do it. The Russians do it. The Americans do it. The Israeli do it. Canadians do it.

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Because they are not evil and we are their allies.   We may not agree with everything they do, but we are with them.

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3 hours ago, QuebecOverCanada said:

Everyone partakes in these conspiracies and murders around the world. The Chinese do it. The Russians do it. The Americans do it. The Israeli do it. Canadians do it.

 

All countries have committed crimes I'm sure but there are others who have committed so much that something has to be done...... they have to be stopped and they have to be stopped soon!

 

Otherwise there will be no more Canada, there will be no more Europe, there will be no more Earth!

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4 minutes ago, Mike Utinne said:

I don't believe that.

Makes me barf too but, it is what it is.

Edited by eyeball

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1 minute ago, scribblet said:

We may not agree with everything they do, but we are with them.

Every time I read such comments, I remember the fat Winston Churchill...... It wasn't until Britain was attacked that everyone believed him. Before that, he was constantly laughed at.

 

Ma'am, may I ask what would Canada do if they decided to invade another country and then and another and another and another and all the meanwhile murdering millions of people?

 

Would Canada blindly follow them to the abyss?

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By they I assume you mean the U.S.   Canada would only go with them if it were U.N. sanctioned action.   Winston Churchill's weight had nothing to do with the fact that he was the greated PM ever. 

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Why doesn't the world destroy them, WHY!? Are you cowards or something!? 

 

You don't seem to have any problem condemning them when they invade this and that and murder these people over here and those people over there and yet when tasked to do something, you give me excuses?

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3 hours ago, bcsapper said:

You stop them.  Tell us all about it.  I'll give you a like. 

Or are you a coward?

I'm not a coward but I can't do it on my own!

 

Either we go together or we fall together.

 

Oh and I almost forgot, this time, it's someone from the Netherlands and she thinks, Americanos are too stupid to rule the world:

 

Why do Europeans hate America?

 

I think because we don’t understand you. We don’t understand your healthcare system, your politics with only two parties to choose from. We don’t understand the big amount of people in your country that deny climate change. We don’t understand how you could vote for a man like Donald Trump. We think you’re stupid, in the way you don’t know anything about the world around you. We think we’re superior in things like design, fashion, food and music. We don’t understand the big cars and houses, and why anyone would like to live in those boring suburbs. We think you’re just too stupid to rule the world.

I know those things are clichés, and lots of Americans aren’t like this. But this is what we see on television, and on the internet, for example in the stupid questions some Americans ask on Quora. And I think we like those clichés, because it makes us feel superior, in the way we are healthy, stylish and environmental conscious. Europeans hate America, to make them feel more love for their own continent, although most people don’t feel connected with the continent, and most Europeans don’t hate America.

 

Jurjen van der Laan, studied at Wageningen University

 

https://www.quora.com/Why-do-Europeans-hate-America

Edited by Mike Utinne

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5 hours ago, Mike Utinne said:

I'm not a coward but I can't do it on my own!

Sure you can.  It'll take time and effort though.  You won't be able to come on here as much.

We can follow your progress on CNN.

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8 minutes ago, bcsapper said:

Sure you can.  It'll take time and effort though.  You won't be able to come on here as much.

We can follow your progress on CNN.

 

No. Either we go together or we fall together, so what say thee?

 

I may be brave and ready to die but I'm not stupid.

 

I'm too lazy to find anything from the UK but here, this time it's from yahoo answers and it's from a kiwi:

 

Why do British people hate Americans?

 

Well I am from New Zealand and a lot of people here dislike Americans too. So does Australia they really dislike America. They have signs in the country that says "go home Yank" and "nothing ever good came out of America". We haven't gone that far. We just say "Americans are imbeciles". It's the fact that when Americans are tourist and visiting other countries. They like to say "oh we have bigger malls back in America" They also tend to be very loud, rude, disrespectful and arrogant. We like canadians. 

Another thing we dont understand is why all the big racist protest. We dont understand why a whole bunch of white Americans test for immigrants to leave or illegal aliens. When white Americans are actually the illegal immigrants. We find that funny. America is made up of immigrants. I am sure they know their history. Then they complain about all these illegal aliens. Oh my goodness, Just give them illegal aliens Visa's. Make them work and Pay taxes. It will get you guys out of recession. We find that hilarious. Plus our currency is actually getting stronger than the American Dollar. Well Australian Dollar is. 1 Australian dollar = 1.0642 U.S. dollars 

 

Anonymous

 

https://au.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110609215034AAMou19

Edited by Mike Utinne

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12 hours ago, Mike Utinne said:

Why do British people hate Americans?

I'm British, and I quite like most of them.

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5 hours ago, bcsapper said:

I'm British, and I quite like most of them.

So? I don't care.

 

I did promise you that every time you responded to me, I would bring up quotations and references.

 

You want it to stop? Don't respond to me because I don't want your inputs.

 

Here, this ones from an Americana who went to your country...... it's kinda sad and inspiring:

 

Why do the British hate Americans?

 

"I travel a lot on business, so I know some of what you are going through and I sympathize - I wish I had a dollar for every anti-American remark I hear these days. I try to keep it in perspective and not get too bent out of shape, but there are times it makes me feel bad and I wonder the same things that you do. 

I think a lot of it is disappointment and betrayal - the British, French and other countries would not hate us so much now if they didn't love the ideals we purport to represent so much. The U.S. holds itself up as the voice of freedom, the hope of the world, the heroes - the American way is supposed to be all about freedom, decency, truth, beauty, tolerance, forgiveness, charity, treating others as you would like to be treated yourself, loving one another, equality and justice for all. That is how we represent ourselves to the world and to ourselves - and whether they admit it or not, most of the countries of the world (and most of us!) believe it, at least a little - we all believe in these things because we want to believe, because it is a dream worth believing in, because these values and the hope and belief in the possibility of a world ruled by them is the only thing that makes life worth living. And, no, we are NOT the only ones with these ideals - but we are the ones who have been most vocal about it and who tie our national identity, our whole rationale for existing, to them. 

Yes, other countries do bad things and screw up (look up France and the Rainbow Warrior and the history of the British in India and Ireland). But everyone expects better from the U.S. - including ourselves. 

So when the U.S. fails to live up to the values and ideals we purport to represent, it is not so surprising that the rest of the world sees it as a deep and bitter betrayal - because we are not just betraying ourselves, but everyone who has trusted in us and believed in the values we claim to represent. Heck, sometimes I feel betrayed - I feel like our government has sold us out to the bureaucrats, corporations and fat cats and betrayed our ideals - but I still believe in the dream. 

I'm not saying all of this hate comes out of disappointment and betrayal - some of it is resentment of our hypocrisy, a large part of it comes out of the urge to blame someone else when things go wrong, rather than looking at one's own actions - and a lot of the current crisis IS our fault, although not all - and the U.S. has set itself up as a great scapegoat. Plus some people like kicking the bully when he's down - and the U.S. government has been a bully sometimes - we've done good things, but we've also thrown our weight around in world politics and trampled on others for almost 100 years - and now we are reaping the bitter of what we have sown. Unfortunately, it is human nature to focus on the bad acts and to forget about the good things done. And then there is plain old jealousy - right or wrong, in this place and time the U.S. is the number one super power - some people resent that, others like kicking the big dog when he's down even more than they like routing for the underdog - again, just human nature. Every nation in the world has their share of arrogance, hypocrisy and every other negative trait I have listed here - but like I said, everyone expects better of the U.S. The U.S. has held itself to a higher standard - so when it fails, sometimes those who have not tried to achieve that standard, or who have tried and failed, rejoice - I think that's sad. One of the things I love best about the U.S. is that we have at least reached for the dream - and you know what I think? - as long as we never give up trying to achieve it, as long as we are willing to fight for it, then we haven't failed. Only quitters fail. 

Not that any of this is fair to you - you weren't even born when most of the events occurred which have caused the current political situation - and since you are only 14, it is highly unlikely that you have any influence on, or involvement in, the choices the U.S. government is making now. Unfortunately, life isn't fair, many people are irrational most of the time, many people are incredibly shallow, many are intolerant and prejudiced in various ways - and many behave like real @ssholes whenever possible - as witness some of the posts here in answer to your question. Look at the girl who wrote about fat like it was America's besetting sin and the person who was obsessed with our accents - both merely shallow physical traits - and the person obsessed with zionist conspiracies and the other prejudiced and unreasoning posts - these comments speak more about the persons who wrote them than the U.S. It's called transference and you can expect to see a lot of it in your life. 

My suggestion - you can't control other people's behavior or opinions - but you CAN control yours. Exercise caution and common sense, but also be as tolerant as you can manage and try not to take any of this personally, or even too seriously - because it really has nothing to do with you as a person. Try and look at the absurdity of it all and to remember that bad behavior most often says more about the person who does it than about the person on the receiving end of it. And try and be something better yourself. Do your best to treat others how you would like to be treated and to be courteous, patient and kind and to listen to everyone, even if you find their behavior, opinions and views offensive - because when you listen and watch people and pay attention, you learn things - and because courtesy costs nothing and gives everything. This doesn't mean you need to stand around and take abuse - sometimes it is best to ignore it, or just to make a polite excuse and walk away, or just to be honest - nor does it mean that you should be best friends with everyone - but do try to be at least civil and courteous with everyone, even when they are behaving badly. I know this is not always possible - and sometimes you have to stand up for yourself and for what you believe - but pick your battles, choose the time and place wisely - and exercise common sense, caution and restraint. For friendship, be choosy - get to know the person and values below the surface and be selective who you choose to spend most of your time with and who you confide in. Have courage and faith in yourself, brace your backbone, lift your chin and grin - and God bless you and good luck!"

 

Copper Cat - https://au.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080315133745AAvokAG

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6 hours ago, Mike Utinne said:

I did promise you that every time you responded to me, I would bring up quotations and references.

So? I don't care.

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12 minutes ago, bcsapper said:

So? I don't care.

 

Why do some British dislike the United States of America?

 

"Well, you asked...

Americans are enslaved by the Puritan Work Ethic. A stultifying doctrine that crushes the human spirit, trammels its creativity and, paradoxically, limits ambition. It's as if you took from us the heritage of the Roundheads but left behind all the joie-de-vivre and devil-may-care flamboyance of the Cavaliers. (You'll need a bit of knowledge of our Civil War and constitutional history to interpret that.) Thankfully, you have just enough maverick throwbacks to keep alive the idea of an alternative. (The Jamaicans have a nice saying which I commend to you: "If work is such a great thing, how come the rich haven't grabbed it all for themselves?")

The American Dream is illusory and for most Americans near the bottom of the heap, a nightmare. You are invited to buy-into the myth: the idea that anyone can 'make it', regardless of how humble their origins are. Most who 'make it' start high and climb higher (and there's no shame in that). An infinitesimal number ever make it out of the swamp at the bottom and the notion of the 'Dream' leads them to believe that their position is therefore somehow their own fault and they are therefore analogous to our old Victorian 'undeserving poor'. *

The unwavering belief that the American Way is best, coupled with the assumption that the lifestyle is aspired to by all, everywhere, unreservedly. The ubiquity of Coca-Cola and McDonalds may reinforce that belief but really that is not the best you have to offer the world and much of the world is ambivalent about what you do offer.

This goes hand-in-hand with a lack of curiosity about, and a general ignorance of, the world at large, even among your educated classes. (A case in point: a friend of mine from South Africa held a senior position in a Software company and transferred to California. On being asked by her new colleagues where she hailed from - they spotted the unusual accent - she told them: Johannesburg, South Africa. They then asked her which state this was in... Yes, really. And these colleagues were educated to masters level or above. Draw your own conclusion.)

And even where there is not ignorance there is often condescension. Two of the most overweeningly arrogant men I ever met were American academics manning an outpost of an American University in Florence. They loved Italy. They said so, repeatedly. But their attitude spoke louder than their words. Italians were lazy, muddled, childlike - in their eyes - unworthy successors to their Roman or Renaissance forbears. Laid back, spontaneous, prone to procrastination Italians may be, but they nonetheless manage to preserve much of their heritage and have a 'savoir vivre' which is second to none. A little of this rubbed-off on the academics after the second bottle of Chianti, but generally they exhibited a dourness which bespoke a Germanic or Dutch extraction.

You tend to continue to deify your past leaders, long after their feet of clay have become apparent. (Maybe you imagine this follows in the illustrious footsteps of the Romans?)

A tendency to regard the rest of the world as a sort of playground where your young people can go to misbehave, fight misguided wars on behalf of their elders and generally exercise a sort of latter-day droit de seigneur. (You may suggest that there is an element of 'the pot calling the kettle...' here.)

... That's the stereotype - which a lot of Americans do their best to perpetuate, at home and abroad.

Thankfully there are others...

The others are more self-aware, aware of the limits of the world-view they inherited, keen to learn about other cultures, especially those with a depth of history that America does not have and generally good company. They are fundamentally secure in their identity. They make no apology for being who and what they are but do not expect the envy of others or seek to aggrandise the American Way. The least of them see America as first-among-equals; the best of them merely as equals.

To summarise I'd say the problem we have with you is that you are like a slightly immature younger brother: very athletic, rather cocksure, utterly unaware of how much you don't know and understand but often amusing and sometimes naively but charmingly righteous. And occasionally awed by both what you have achieved - and it's a lot, in many fields: literature, science, technology, arts - you more-or-less gave the world Cinema - and by your own potential.

And we couldn't have won WWII without you (notwithstanding the Hollywood view that John Wayne won it single-handed, we were there too).

The world can learn a lot from America - both how to do things and how not to do things. And America can learn a lot from the world; and, by going out into the world with an open heart and an open mind, that won't just be how everything that's best originates at home...

I dearly love my American friends. Some of them find their country exasperating at times (as I do mine).

We don't really dislike America - we just dislike the way some Americans try to be in the world.

* It could be argued that the Dream is in its death throes, that the election of Donald Trump represents a last-ditch attempt to breathe new life into it. It won't succeed. Who knows, maybe the reappraisal of the American Dream will turn out to be the silver lining to your dark cloud?"

 

John Welch, Garden and Landscape designer, writer and teacher

 

https://www.quora.com/Why-do-some-British-dislike-the-United-States-of-America

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3 minutes ago, Mike Utinne said:

"Well, you asked...

Yeah, but that doesn't mean I care.

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On 5/7/2019 at 1:02 AM, Mike Utinne said:

Is it not the duty of morally superior or noble people to stop evil as well?

 

This whole "the US is too powerful to be stopped" is unacceptable, if that's your first response.

 

Has it not occurred to you that if you let them do evil things now, they will continue to do evil things..... forever? 

 

So, Europeans of the world and Canadians as well..... you love to criticize their foreign policy, their invasions, their murdering of peoples all over the world........... explain to me why you haven't done anything to stop them?

Fist off I don't believe anyone is morally superior to anyone or any country is morally superior to another. I find such assumptions illogical. Homo sapiens by inherent nature is a mix of immoral and moral traits, constantly struggling to balance its inherent good and evil.

Your question selects out the US, why? Do you really want to suggest there is evil only in the US?

As for me as an individual I have what is called the gift of free choice and I use it as much as I possibly can to try do good and avoid evil and I am inperfect and phack up a lot. Sorry.

May I also suggest you ask yourself the question you ask others and tell me what you intend to do about China,  Russia, Iran, North Korea, Saudi Arabia and Kanye West.

 

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7 hours ago, Rue said:

May I also suggest you ask yourself the question you ask others and tell me what you intend to do about China,  Russia, Iran, North Korea, Saudi Arabia and Kanye West.

 

When the time comes, they would be dealt with as well.

 

You can deal with Kanye West now if you want to while he is not as powerful as Xi Jinping.

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9 hours ago, bcsapper said:

Yeah, but that doesn't mean I care.

 

Never realized that the British were such a hateful people even to their fellow whites...... makes me wonder why they bothered to save you in WW2 and remain allies with you........ tttttt.

 

Anti-Americanism 'feels like racism'

 

"The former model moved to London a year ago, where she is setting up her own business, and has been surprised at how some people have reacted to her nationality.

Ms Cox, 29, says she has been called, among other things, "terrorist", "scum", "low life", and feels that she is constantly being held to account for the actions of President Bush and for US foreign policy.

This is despite the fact that she doesn't agree with the war in Iraq and didn't vote for Bush."

 

She has travelled widely in other parts of Europe, Mexico, Canada and Australia but says this is the first time her pride in her country has been challenged in such a vitriolic way.

 

"People would make jokes about Americans but I didn't experience the pure hatred I have had since I came to live here.

"I appreciate that British people often don't understand why I have so much pride, they think it's brainwashing.

 

"And I do think some people in the US need to be more educated about what's going on in the world.

"But some people just fly off the handle without even talking to me - it's as if they had been waiting to run into an American all day to let their feelings out," she says.

 

But in one incident an older man asked her directly if she was American.

"When I said yes he said: 'I just want you to know that I think you are the poorest people I have ever met in my life' - meaning we were low-life.

"I said I was sorry he felt that way, but that I disagreed."

The man started shouting obscenities at her group. The row developed into a brawl and Ms Cox suffered a black eye as she tried to pull two people apart.

 

"After that I cried for two days, then booked a flight back to the States. I felt so hated, I needed to be with people who loved me."

Some friends now advise her to tell people she is Canadian, to deflect potential abuse, an option she calls "sad".

 

But in one incident an older man asked her directly if she was American.

"When I said yes he said: 'I just want you to know that I think you are the poorest people I have ever met in my life' - meaning we were low-life.

"I said I was sorry he felt that way, but that I disagreed."

The man started shouting obscenities at her group. The row developed into a brawl and Ms Cox suffered a black eye as she tried to pull two people apart.

 

"After that I cried for two days, then booked a flight back to the States. I felt so hated, I needed to be with people who loved me."

Some friends now advise her to tell people she is Canadian, to deflect potential abuse, an option she calls "sad".

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The following comments reflect the balance of opinions received.

 

If you suspect your 'Canadian' is actually American, ask them to name three provinces (excluding Ontario). Or ask them what the capital of Saskatchewan is. You'll soon know. (We don't like the either, by the way.)
Jim Connolly, Toronto, Canada

 

I feel no pity for Americans working abroad - they get to see first hand what their foreign policies are doing to the rest of the world.
Ian Anderson, Aberdeen, UK

 

I'm an American living in Belgium and it shocks me to see that Americans probably receive more "racist" comments in Europe than the immigrants we so often read are being discriminated against. My grandfather fought here in WWII and sometimes I think of the irony that it is their freedom he secured than makes me feel so insecure in Europe.
Charles, Brussels, Belgium

 

I am married to a British national and did a posting with the Canadian High Commission in London from 2000-2004. I suffered verbal abuse on a few occasions when people thought I was American. It got to the point where my husband asked that we not talk on the Tube into London and I wore a Canadian Maple Leaf lapel pin. 
Pam Saunders, Singapore

 

Cry me a river. How much American tolerance and openness do Iranian visitors to the US experience these days? We can't pick and choose the aspects of our national image we want to be identified with. This extreme form of individualism - 'I'm only responsible for what I myself did, not what my government does in my name' - is precisely the sort of thing which gives Americans such a bad name.
Scott, Stirling, UK

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk/4881474.stm

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5 hours ago, Mike Utinne said:

Never realized that the British were such a hateful people even to their fellow whites...... makes me wonder why they bothered to save you in WW2 and remain allies with you........ tttttt.

Yeah, I checked, and I still don't care.

 

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17 minutes ago, bcsapper said:

Yeah, I checked, and I still don't care.

 

Then stop responding to me! If you don't care why keep responding?

 

Gosh this is getting tedious:

 

 

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