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Native inquiry an orgy of progressive guilt-mongering

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6 hours ago, Armchairprophet said:

One such report? lol That's cute. Try 98 there sport, starting in 1907 with the Bryce report. Every single one of them reached the same damn conclusion. Except the one sponsored by Groper of course because he loves trashing the so-called "old stock" Canadians and getting all self-aggrandizing about it. And this current report drew from the 98 previous reports and yet managed to reach an entirely different conclusion than the previous 98. As for unsolved cases, here's the reality. A lot of FN are leary about the police. And with the actions of some cops I don't blame them. When you don't trust the police, you're less likely to talk to them unless you're directly affected by the murder/disappearance of family or a good friend. Makes solving cases harder when no one will talk to you.

Then there's this;

"In April 2014, then aboriginal affairs minister Bernard Valcourt told First Nations chiefs that, in 70 per cent of the cases of murdered and missing aboriginal women, indigenous men had been the perpetrators."

"The notion of First Nations women only being killed by their boyfriends and spouses is a myth," said Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler of Nishnawbe Aski Nation, which represents 49 northern Ontario First Nations."

The problem with the Grand Chief's rebuttal is that the RCMP said in 70% of the cases Aboriginal men were the perpetrators. They said nothing about that 70% being boyfriends or spouses. This verifies what's been found in previous studies. This was also borne out in stats by an independent study on the murder of women in general in Canada. The study, sponsored by a woman, found that across all racial groups in Canada women are murdered predominantly by men from the same racial group as they were. This ranged from 70%-80%.

I also have a theory as to why the stark increase in violence against FN women happened. If you look at the years it started getting bad, it correlates somewhat closely to the rapid increase in juvenile suicides on the reserves. Now I now I'm going to get some flak for this but I know PRECISELY of what I speak. There are, sadly, some (actually or than just some) Chiefs out there who emotionally blackmail their people into never leaving the reserve for "the White man's world". If they do they are booted permanently from the band and banned from returning.  Now, around the time both kinds of incidence were on the increase is around the time when the internet and cell- phones starting showing up on many reserves. For those who were being emotionally blackmailed, they could see what they could never have and a world they could never be part of, unless they left. Having little or no hope can cause changes in behaviour. Some people get severely depressed and ultimately end their lives. Others can become angry and turn violent. Alcohol/substance abuse can also magnify those feelings.

Jesus Christ, even the virtue signaling, leftist rag Red Star thinks suggesting that this "genocide" is still going on is a bit much. Look, no one is suggesting that there wasn't some lame attempt at genocide via the residential school system but to suggest there's STILL a continuing "colonial genocide" is absurd to the utmost. 

You need to provide some links to the "98" reports you refer to. The only figure you quote is "70%" and that comes from the 2015 RCMP report of solved cases. You have nothing else, and you're making stuff up: 

Though an interesting occurrence in the context of considerations of genocide, Chief Medical Officer of Indian Affairs Dr. Peter Bryce's 1907 report certainly was not about murdered women. It was about the number of children dying of tuberculosis in the residential schools, due to failure to separate sick children from others, as was the law and practice everywhere else in Canada.

According to a national magazine, the same year Bryce made his report "Indian boys and girls are dying like flies.... Even war seldom shows as large a percentage of fatalities as does the education system we have imposed on our Indian wards."

But the government failed to act. 

 A few years later, in 1918, Duncan Campbell Scott, wrote “It is readily acknowledged that Indian children lose their natural resistance to illness by habituating so closely in the residential schools, and that they die at a much higher rate than in their villages. But this alone does not justify a change in the policy of this Department, which is geared towards a final solution of our Indian Problem.”

The fact of children dying at high rates due to failure to separate children "does not justify a change in the policy..."

That's called genocide.

Bryce was sidelined for his protests, and after his retirement he wrote a book about the situation called A National Crime.

But it is NOT about missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Valcourt's "70%" comment related to the one RCMP data report on solved cases with offenders identified.  How many missing and murdered women's cases are unsolved? They don't say. 

You have no others. "98" reports of data on murdered Indigenous women? 

Nonsense.

Edited by jacee

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On 6/9/2019 at 9:46 AM, Zeitgeist said:

I appreciate you digging into the weeds on this and being specific.  Cultural genocide is much more arguable than the broader term genocide, which is misleading and inflammatory.  

"Cultural genocide" is an aspect of genocide, not separate from it: There is no separate "cultural genocide" in law, as it is covered by the "acts" of genocide.

 

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Policies were enacted, particularly the Indian Act, that treated Indigenous people as second class citizens.  These policies have changed

Not entirely. Some of the more blatantly oppressive genocidal elements of the Indian Act were changed in 1951 (under pressure to sign the 1948 UN Convention on Genocide) and more in the 1970's I think. But Canada still delayed passing it's own law against genocide until 2000,  4 years after the last government-run 'Indian' Residential School closed.

The Indian Act is still discriminatory, oppressive and riddled with genocidal "intent to destroy" Indigenous Peoples "as such".

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and it’s important to remember both that, for First Nations, there has always been the question of whether Indigenous groups wish to consider themselves Canadians and there are financial benefits to having Indian status, not just free land. 

Prior to 1951, the benefits of Canadian citizenship were contingent upon giving up 'Indian' status (ie, any claim to the land). 

Indigenous people are entitled to the same benefits as all Canadians: welfare, disability and public housing for low income people; seniors benefits (OAS, GIS), Healthcare, education, children's services ... nothing 'special', and sometimes less - education per-pupil funding is less on reserves, for example. These differences are referred to as 'gaps' in equality of funding. 

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 That’s why the larger discussion of how to improve Indigenous affairs is problematic.  Who decides what constitutes improvement and who pays for it?  If it’s really about self-reliance and self-government, the government is encouraging that.

To date, the government has only encouraged Indigenous "self-government" at the cost of a final settlement and extinguishing all Aboriginal rights forever. That has been rejected repeatedly by First Nations, most recently Trudeau's "Indigenous Framework". It's an extortion document, holding children's funding ransom until Chiefs agree to give up all Aboriginal rights especially land rights ... because business needs "certainty" - ie, Alberta and Trudeau want pipelines to "tidewater". 

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  If it’s about transfer of more taxpayer income to Indigenous affairs, particularly if the request is being made without any conditions of accountability attached, an informed public is unlikely to support that for sensible reasons.

Indigenous Nations made treaties that included revenue payments from resources taken from their land, land sales and leases, etc. The federal government is Trustee for those funds from Confederation forward. The 'Indian' Trust Funds are more than sufficient to support Indigenous communities, but an accurate accounting for those Indigenous Trust Fund monies has never been provided by the federal government. Instead, there is evidence that the Trustee (federal government) stole much of the 'Indian' Trust Funds and used it for us instead (to build Osgood Hall, McGill university for example), or leases and other revenues were simply not paid.

I think Canadians should be demanding a full accounting for 'Indian' Trust Funds from Confederation forward, because no taxpayer money should ever be required to support Indigenous Peoples. Trustees who steal from trust funds they administer go to jail.

One example I'm aware of: Some of the land of City of Brantford was leased from Haudenosaunee Six Nations, but not paid. The Mayor once gave a figure of the outstanding amounts just for those leases. At the time, I estimated Six Nations 'government' funding from Confederation forward, and it was far far less than the amounts owed to their Trust Fund for just those leases. And they have many many more outstanding claims for unpaid revenues and other funds missing from their Trust Fund. Also, businesses on reserve pay Federal taxes, amounts far exceeding their annual 'government' funding.

Indigenous Nations are not dependent on taxpayer money. Rather, our governments (and thus we also) are dependent on embezzling 'Indian' Trust Fund money.

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On the particular matter of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, there are policies that should be enacted right away, such as the ombudsman, police training, and far better outreach and protections for women on and off reserves.  Those may have additional costs attached to them that are well worth paying.  

Agreed.

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Don’t drag guaranteed basic income, land claims, or wider discussions about how many more services and benefits government should provide the population.  Those are outside the purview.  Their inclusion seems ideological and will simply get people’s backs up, even though some of those items certainly warrant consideration for a host of reasons.

All warrant consideration. Canada's legal obligations for all outstanding Land Claims should have been settled long ago, but each government just delays, wasting money in litigation and negotiation with no real intent to settle anything,   kicking the can down the road to the next government and continuing to underfund services for Indigenous children, adults and communities, even though the funds administered by the government are Indigenous Trust Fund monies

Indigenous issues are poverty issues to some extent. It is neither surprising, nor unreasonable that the report recommends Guaranteed Basic Income,  a very successful program where implemented, saving much more money than it costs. (Eg, in policing, Emergency hospital use, social and children's services, gaining education for employment, reducing the vulnerability of women, etc). 

I hope this is helpful to your understandings. 

Edited by jacee

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On 6/10/2019 at 11:28 AM, egghead said:

I am sorry for my ignorance :rolleyes:;

I believe the native used the term "genocide" correctly (may be little bit of over exaggerate). However, I am confused. Did Indigenous peoples say it happened when Mackenzie was Canada PM or now? 

They are saying that Canada's genocidal "intent to destroy" Indigenous Peoples "as such" has always existed, still exists, and is manifested in many devious ways through systemic racism, dismissing, degrading and dehumanizing Indigenous women as one relevant example. 

Genocide is a process of destroying a group, not a single event. 

Edited by jacee

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23 minutes ago, jacee said:

 I hope this is helpful to your understandings. 

I know I'm not holding my breath.

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On 6/6/2019 at 5:51 AM, Armchairprophet said:

As opposed to idiots using over blown hyperbole and rhetoric because they don't like the fact the stats don't bear out the "Blame Whitey" bullshit narrative? Tell us oh great adjective spewer, how exactly does male Natives murdering female Natives constitute "genocide"? Why is a 17% unsolved rate for non-Native women not even newsworthy but a 19% unsolved rate for Native women is an abomination? The simple fact is, there have been studies on this very subject before and they all came to the same conclusion.  There was even an independent study on murdered and missing women in general  in Canada and across all racial groups, the vast majority of women are murdered by men from the same racial group. This latest MMIW crap is just another example of leftists (and various elements in the Native community who can't resist playing the identity politics game) refusing to accept reality.

But then what can you expect from a group of worthless troglodytes who  scream "NAZI!!!!!!" every time someone rejects their morally and emotionally relativistic ideology while believing the Natives were caretakers of the Earth and lived in some Kum By Yah fantasy world.

If nothing else this crap report has managed to wake many Canadians up to the idiocy of the native activists continuous demands and refusal to take responsibility for themselves.

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On 6/8/2019 at 9:06 AM, Nefarious Banana said:

As above ^^

Is there ever a time when someone refuses to be a victim, refuses to view themselves as a victim, refuses to play the part of a victim . . . 

Generations of natives with no direction, no concept of how to look after themselves, no work ethic, no skills, no need to do anything . . . there is no amount of money that will 'fix' this.

With a little bit of initiative and enthusiasm, most anyone can make their life better . . . .

They can but as long as the activist types hold sway we can forget that they will ever even try. 

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On 6/8/2019 at 10:28 AM, ImBrock said:

We deliberately sold them blankets that had been used by people with small pox. Since europeans came to the region known as canada 9/10ths of the natives that used to live here have died.

What an ignorant and ill-informed comment.  Best you do your research before you post such erroneous drivel.

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12 hours ago, jacee said:

It's worth considering all possibilities, accounting for all deaths and disappearances. I don't think police would want to be seen just writing women off as "prostitutes and street people".

They don't. But by their nature, street people move around and move on without notice, and don't have the normal secure lifestyle which would allow anyone to know when they're missing or why, or to allow police to track them down as easily. When a housewife disappears, or a woman who has worked as at a job and lived at the same place regularly for years, it gets noticed and police quickly realize something could be wrong. When a prostitute who is a drug user disappears nobody notices except other street people who often don't tell police. And then where do you look?

And I never heard of a native woman who was killed simply because someone didn't like natives. They have the same risks as prostitutes and drug abusers of other races.

Edited by Argus
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3 hours ago, jacee said:

"Cultural genocide" is an aspect of genocide, not separate from it: There is no separate "cultural genocide" in law, as it is covered by the "acts" of genocide.

There is no such thing as 'cultural genocide' in law.

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2 hours ago, jacee said:

They are saying that Canada's genocidal "intent to destroy" Indigenous Peoples "as such" has always existed, still exists, and is manifested in many devious ways t

Which somehow results in the continuing increase in the population of indigenous peoples. :rolleyes:

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While I am from a legal perspective adamant on honouring legal treaties with the aboriginal collective and continuing to use certain of their laws and traditions in modern law particularly when it comes to the environment I do concede using past history as an excuse not to deal with current issues is not helpful.

I have noticed some not all leaders in aboriginal communities using past issues as a sort of catch 22 to excuse all current problems. That is not helpful.  Substance abuse, incest,  sexual assault and violence, peophilia are serious issues leading to mass suicide of young aboriginals. The question is how long is the past used as an excuse to NOT change the present? If its used as a crutch its destructive. I mention that because it is what certain aboriginal leaders are now saying to their own people and ultimately aboriginal people will have to decide what they need to do NOW to address their failures. Relying on lip service from Trudeau won't change a damn thing, nor will making excuses for corrupt aboriginal politicians either. That said, blaming all aboriginals for certain problems facing them is pointless but there is a real limit as to what non aboriginals can do or say. The changes have to come from within their communities. I myself do not like the Indian Act for that reason. I think it prevents change. I would argue it entrenches methods and policies that no longer work.

I think we need to bring the aboriginal councils into a more visible government that is an active part of the federal Parliament guaranteed a certain no. of seats just like each province is. Whether those MP's then decide to sit independently or as part of one of the parties is their choice. I would also dismantle the Indian Act entirely. It belongs as part of the intergovernmental  affairs and Cultural portfolios. Then again  I think Fisheries, Health and Environment should be one Ministry, Vetreran Affairs  and Defence one Minuistry, Homeland Security and Immigration one Ministry, all Trade, Natural Resources, Energy and Agricultureone Commewrce   porfolio and Finance absorb the Treasury Board.

Shrink that government down and identify redundant services that can be offloaded to provincial governments and non profit organizations and the savings used to provide assistance to infrastructure for each province, rebuilding the Defence Ministry and paying down the deficit.

Also it is high time aboriginals are placed in a special operational military unit of  Rangers and used to police the environment, fisheries and sovereign borders especially up in the Northern remote border areas..

Also why are we not developing eco tourism up in our North to employ aboriginals and Northerners as well.

 

 

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23 minutes ago, Argus said:

There is no such thing as 'cultural genocide' in law.

There is 'cultural genocide.' China gov;t is doing it now. Gov't forces ladies in minority ethnic groups (Hui, Uyghur, Qiang ....) to marry a Chinese and forces the minority ethnic groups' children to attend in chinese school only. Anyway, I thought indigenous peoples were meant that.

 

Now, it seems that indigenous peoples are playing victimhood or we have canadian way of genocide 

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22 minutes ago, egghead said:

Now, it seems that indigenous peoples are playing victimhood or we have canadian way of genocide 

Then there's the economic genocide conservatives are whining about.

Oh the fucking humanity.

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The term Genocide for this issue of Native women gone missing is very much a lie.  The problem is that the lifestyle that those particular women chose is what led to these issues.  They have a lot of issues and violence amongst themselves.  They would never admit to that either.  By lifestyle I mean the laid back lifestyle they have and they do not have the same level of responsibilities that non-natives need in order to survive as they get a lot of stuff for free.  That then encourages waste, no appreciation for what you have, lack of pride, and a host of other issues.  I mean anyone being treated this way would have these same issues, native or non-native.  Subsidizing the natives, free education, free pharmaceuticals, free help, I would hardly call this Genocide.  The Natives actually have alot big families because of the assistance they get.  Non-natives don't have that luxury so the families are of more modest size.  There again because of these policies, I can hardly see this as Genocide.  It's more of a lifestyle problem and alot of it within their own social environment.

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6 hours ago, jacee said:

"Cultural genocide" is an aspect of genocide, not separate from it: There is no separate "cultural genocide" in law, as it is covered by the "acts" of genocide.

 

Not entirely. Some of the more blatantly oppressive genocidal elements of the Indian Act were changed in 1951 (under pressure to sign the 1948 UN Convention on Genocide) and more in the 1970's I think. But Canada still delayed passing it's own law against genocide until 2000,  4 years after the last government-run 'Indian' Residential School closed.

The Indian Act is still discriminatory, oppressive and riddled with genocidal "intent to destroy" Indigenous Peoples "as such".

Prior to 1951, the benefits of Canadian citizenship were contingent upon giving up 'Indian' status (ie, any claim to the land). 

Indigenous people are entitled to the same benefits as all Canadians: welfare, disability and public housing for low income people; seniors benefits (OAS, GIS), Healthcare, education, children's services ... nothing 'special', and sometimes less - education per-pupil funding is less on reserves, for example. These differences are referred to as 'gaps' in equality of funding. 

To date, the government has only encouraged Indigenous "self-government" at the cost of a final settlement and extinguishing all Aboriginal rights forever. That has been rejected repeatedly by First Nations, most recently Trudeau's "Indigenous Framework". It's an extortion document, holding children's funding ransom until Chiefs agree to give up all Aboriginal rights especially land rights ... because business needs "certainty" - ie, Alberta and Trudeau want pipelines to "tidewater". 

Indigenous Nations made treaties that included revenue payments from resources taken from their land, land sales and leases, etc. The federal government is Trustee for those funds from Confederation forward. The 'Indian' Trust Funds are more than sufficient to support Indigenous communities, but an accurate accounting for those Indigenous Trust Fund monies has never been provided by the federal government. Instead, there is evidence that the Trustee (federal government) stole much of the 'Indian' Trust Funds and used it for us instead (to build Osgood Hall, McGill university for example), or leases and other revenues were simply not paid.

I think Canadians should be demanding a full accounting for 'Indian' Trust Funds from Confederation forward, because no taxpayer money should ever be required to support Indigenous Peoples. Trustees who steal from trust funds they administer go to jail.

One example I'm aware of: Some of the land of City of Brantford was leased from Haudenosaunee Six Nations, but not paid. The Mayor once gave a figure of the outstanding amounts just for those leases. At the time, I estimated Six Nations 'government' funding from Confederation forward, and it was far far less than the amounts owed to their Trust Fund for just those leases. And they have many many more outstanding claims for unpaid revenues and other funds missing from their Trust Fund. Also, businesses on reserve pay Federal taxes, amounts far exceeding their annual 'government' funding.

Indigenous Nations are not dependent on taxpayer money. Rather, our governments (and thus we also) are dependent on embezzling 'Indian' Trust Fund money.

Agreed.

All warrant consideration. Canada's legal obligations for all outstanding Land Claims should have been settled long ago, but each government just delays, wasting money in litigation and negotiation with no real intent to settle anything,   kicking the can down the road, and continuing to underfund services for Indigenous children, adults and communities.

Indigenous issues are poverty issues to some extent. It is neither surprising, nor unreasonable that the report recommends Guaranteed Basic Income,  a very successful program where implemented, saving much more money than it costs. (Eg, in policing, Emergency hospital use, social and children's services, gaining education for employment, reducing the vulnerability of women, etc). 

I hope this is helpful to your understandings. 

Who is holding back the final removal/revisions of the Indian Act?  Is it really the federal government?  My understanding is that Trudeau wanted to make serious reforms but at least some Indigenous leadership walked away, including Jody Wilson-Raybould.  Why is this?  Could it be because there are vested interests within Indigenous communities and no one wants to be blamed for their removal?   You can’t have it both ways, calling the reserve system apartheid while at the same time wanting to retain its benefits.  The “Trust Fund” is a a bit of a chimera, an attempt to exact rent for what is now privately owned or crown land.  Of course at the time of settlement there was little interest in this land because it seemed endless and items like rifles for hunting seemed as valuable as land when treaties were negotiated.  Of course we know that different peoples moved through and lived on these lands for periods who didn’t call it property.  

Also, on the one hand you say Indigenous should have the same privileges as all Canadians and claim that these are insufficiently provided, mainly because small remote communities that Indigenous will not leave are prohibitively expensive to service, but then you also say that Indigenous peoples should retain special privileges afforded to people with Indian status.  

Here’s reality:  Most Canadians don’t care what the Indigenous do as long as it doesn’t involve trying to take non-Indigenous people’s income and property.  Have at it.  No one gets a free lunch.  

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I disagree.  The Free Lunch is there.  The problem really is that the government throws money (tax payers monies) to the Natives, and the Chiefs (which are many) are in control of the funding for their own people and have no accountability.  No one really knows what really happens to all of that funding.  That is one issue.  The disappearance of Indian women has nothing to do with what you are saying.  Genocide does not fit in there.  They all get alot of free stuff no one else is entitled to so that is another issue as I have stated.  It makes them expect things without earning them.  Yes we have gained the value of land and real estate.  But they have gained much more.  Knowledge, Technology, etc.  It is time for them to move on from the Past.  And there is no arguing that they have the same privileges as all Canadians but they actually have more.

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It appears that there is a similar problem in the U.S., 56 women missing in this county..   there must be a common link here as to why so many.

https://komonews.com/news/local/56-indigenous-woman-missing-from-king-county-new-reports-finds

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On 6/11/2019 at 4:42 PM, Zeitgeist said:

Who is holding back the final removal/revisions of the Indian Act?  Is it really the federal government?  My understanding is that Trudeau wanted to make serious reforms but at least some Indigenous leadership walked away, including Jody Wilson-Raybould.  Why is this?

The Indigenous Framework is another neoLiberal ploy. It seeks to negotiate extinguishment of Aboriginal rights, withholding funds for children's services, etc. to extort compliance. Now Trudeau's trying to roll it out in pieces, children's services first.  

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Could it be because there are vested interests within Indigenous communities and no one wants to be blamed for their removal?

 Could be there's a variety of opinions, Canada's Band Councils, Traditional Councils.

The Supreme Court upholds Aboriginal and Treaty rights. So does the Queen. 

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You can’t have it both ways, calling the reserve system apartheid while at the same time wanting to retain its benefits.

The reserves were set up as apartheid, starving, extorting and pushing Indigenous Peoples into small portions of their traditional lands, out of the way of industry and commerce. 

Many are reasserting their rights on their larger traditional lands too, a say in development and a share in revenues, self-sustaining in place. 

The reserves and traditional lands are home to those who live there and for many more who are from there.

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The “Trust Fund” is a a bit of a chimera, an attempt to exact rent for what is now privately owned or crown land.  Of course at the time of settlement there was little interest in this land because it seemed endless and items like rifles for hunting seemed as valuable as land when treaties were negotiated.  Of course we know that different peoples moved through and lived on these lands for periods who didn’t call it property.

Indigenous Peoples may have moved seasonally within their traditional lands for food and medicine gathering, etc. and every 20 years or so to allow land to regenerate, if they grew food. Other groups might stay on their land by agreement. All of this is considered by the courts when necessary re Title and Aboriginal rights.

Crown Land is traditional Indigenous land under protection of the Crown. Traditional Indigenous land is Canada's industrial area: Logging, mining, oil, gas, and our governments get revenue from that. Indigenous people get some jobs, some business perhaps, but also get contamination of their food and water supplies. "The trees are gone, the animals and birds and bees are gone, the geese don't come anymore, the fish have tumours' ... a common story for Indigenous communities throughout Canada's. 

Indigenous Trust Funds are a reality of the Treaties made to allow us to live on Indigenous land. The Federal government, as Trustee, will have to account for the Indigenous shares of revenues from industries, that are to be deposited in Indigenous Trust Funds, so they can sustain themselves. But Canada's accountants seem incompetent in that.

 The private property land registry is under protection of provincial governments, and while there may have to be compensation paid where land was 'assumed' without agreement, it's highly unlikely that governments would 'take anyone's property' for that reason. Though for oil & gas & pipelines they would, with some compensation perhaps.

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Also, on the one hand you say Indigenous should have the same privileges as all Canadians and claim that these are insufficiently provided, mainly because small remote communities that Indigenous will not leave are prohibitively expensive to service, but then you also say that Indigenous peoples should retain special privileges afforded to people with Indian status.

Yes, the public services we all receive are funded at lower levels for Indigenous communities, with no explanation and no accounting for that: Just racial discrimination in provision of public services to Indigenous people living on reserves.

More than half live off reserve, though. 

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Here’s reality:  Most Canadians don’t care what the Indigenous do as long as it doesn’t involve trying to take non-Indigenous people’s income and property.  Have at it.  No one gets a free lunch.

In Canada we do support all people with low/no income, or with disabilities, and  seniors: income supports and public housing, healthcare, etc. On reserves, as elsewhere in Canada, about 80% of the people on 'welfare' are single mothers with young children. (Caveat: Canada does discriminate against low/no income single men, who seldom if ever get public housing, so stay homeless on the street.)

Since nobody's doing any of that stuff you've raised as concerns, (see above), then really you have nothing to worry about. And if the Federal government starts depositing, distributing and publicly accounting for Indigenous monies the way a Trustee is legally required to, it will be more understandable and acceptable to Canadians.

Maintaining the lie that support for Indigenous people comes from Canadian taxpayers is a heinous, divisive and devious government strategy to sustain systemic racism against Indigenous Peoples, to cover up federal government embezzlement of Indigenous funds and to convince Canadians that the "final solution" to the Indigenous "problem" is to force them to fully assimilate, with intent to destroy them as Indigenous Nations. That systemic racism filters down through all public services, including policing.

Of course, some people don't care about those financial realities of Canada since their denigration of Indigenous Peoples is just one aspect of their racism.

White supremacists like Faith Goldy, for example, never change their racist tune due to new information, because their tune is purely about racism, not really about funding or any other excuses. They're just as likely to be out on street corners bleating against Muslims too. Lol 

Edited by jacee
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7 hours ago, scribblet said:

It appears that there is a similar problem in the U.S., 56 women missing in this county..   there must be a common link here as to why so many.

https://komonews.com/news/local/56-indigenous-woman-missing-from-king-county-new-reports-finds

And Australia too 

https://www.sbs.com.au/vanished/

Hmmm ... what could that common link be? 

Edited by jacee

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I’m afraid that, apart from some land claims, important protections for vulnerable women and children, and whatever revisions to the Indian Act Indigenous peoples can agree to, there isn’t much that governments can do.  The most successful Indigenous people have left the reserves and are participating in the wider economy, apart from those on the well managed and resource rich reserves.  

Canadians are already ready to tar and feather Trudeau (figuratively) over reckless public spending and over promising.  Like with constitutional debate, governments need to avoid the Indigenous Affairs no-win quagmire and stick to bread and butter issues.  There will never be enough money or land because too much is given rather than earned.  It’s learned helplessness, sadly.  Even after massive payouts and dialogues, Canada will be blamed for getting it wrong, so to my mind, let the money flow at current levels with rises for inflation and turn as much of the decision making over to the Indigenous so non-Indigenous can no longer be blamed.  Leave the land claims and other battles for resources (or royalties) to the courts.  

No doubt it will still be governments building the roads, schools, housing, and infrastructure.  We’re stuck with that because too many Indigenous want to remain tethered to the reserves and collect what is given.  If I was Indigenous I’d want the right to own and sell reserve land privately and get the hell out of Dodge, but I’m not, so my opinion doesn’t come into it. 

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1 hour ago, Argus said:

Alcoholism and drug abuse?

No goals in life, nothing to strive for . . .

There are many 'first immigrant' men working in the coast logging industry. For the most part, they're a hard working bunch. No different than the many 'second immigration' men in that industry.  The one blaring commonality with the 'first Immigrant' fellas is that they would never go back to live on reserve. Many of them are shunned by family and friends for making the break with the reserve life of doing nothing. These 'first immigrant' loggers don't follow an easy road in life . . . but, they'll never go back from where they came.

Hat's off to those fellas that saw that life was full of choices and chose to become involved in this country. Chose to contribute to this country and culture. 

ps. I can wear a moccasin or cowboy boot . . . . they both fit.

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6 hours ago, Zeitgeist said:

I’m afraid that, apart from some land claims, important protections for vulnerable women and children, and whatever revisions to the Indian Act Indigenous peoples can agree to, there isn’t much that governments can do.  The most successful Indigenous people have left the reserves and are participating in the wider economy, apart from those on the well managed and resource rich reserves.  

Canadians are already ready to tar and feather Trudeau (figuratively) over reckless public spending and over promising.  Like with constitutional debate, governments need to avoid the Indigenous Affairs no-win quagmire and stick to bread and butter issues.  There will never be enough money or land because too much is given rather than earned.  It’s learned helplessness, sadly.  Even after massive payouts and dialogues, Canada will be blamed for getting it wrong, so to my mind, let the money flow at current levels with rises for inflation and turn as much of the decision making over to the Indigenous so non-Indigenous can no longer be blamed.  Leave the land claims and other battles for resources (or royalties) to the courts.  

No doubt it will still be governments building the roads, schools, housing, and infrastructure.  We’re stuck with that because too many Indigenous want to remain tethered to the reserves and collect what is given.  If I was Indigenous I’d want the right to own and sell reserve land privately and get the hell out of Dodge, but I’m not, so my opinion doesn’t come into it. 

Nonsense.

The truth is as posted, and you wouldn't respond: 

Maintaining the lie that support for Indigenous people comes from Canadian taxpayers is a heinous, divisive and devious government strategy to sustain systemic racism against Indigenous Peoples, to cover up federal government embezzlement of Indigenous funds and to convince Canadians that the "final solution" to the Indigenous "problem" is to force them to fully assimilate, with intent to destroy them as Indigenous Nations. That systemic racism filters down through all public services, including policing.

Of course, some people don't care about those financial realities of Canada since their denigration of Indigenous Peoples is just one aspect of their racism.

White supremacists like Faith Goldy, for example, never change their racist tune due to new information, because their tune is purely about racism, not really about funding or any other excuses. They're just as likely to be out on street corners bleating against Muslims too. Lol

Edited by jacee
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