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I had plans earlier this year with this subject...history....but got sidelined by THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT.

My apologies.

Any thoughts on current affairs and history are probably appropriate here. 

Who started the war?? Let's discuss....

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The Devil At Your Heels (1981) Ken Carter's historic attempt to jump the St. Lawrence River.      

I know there has been a LOT of activity by me in this club the past few days...just waiting-out a family medical emergency...you know how those things go. How we cope...

Depends how far back you want to go. Ook threw the first rock... Things were always bad. But things were stable sometimes for centuries. Why that is, is debatable. Watched a good show a

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On 9/26/2020 at 10:12 PM, DogOnPorch said:

 Who started the war?? Let's discuss....

Depends how far back you want to go.

Ook threw the first rock...

Things were always bad. But things were stable sometimes for centuries. Why that is, is debatable.

Watched a good show about WW1 the other day, and it made me think of how it went wrong. Europe, the Habsburgs, the Tsar. The Archduke and his wife.

Treachery and savagery of the Bolsheviks, and of Rasputin.

Yes, its all a rich tapestry...

 

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On 10/3/2020 at 7:21 PM, OftenWrong said:

Depends how far back you want to go.

Ook threw the first rock...

Things were always bad. But things were stable sometimes for centuries. Why that is, is debatable.

Watched a good show about WW1 the other day, and it made me think of how it went wrong. Europe, the Habsburgs, the Tsar. The Archduke and his wife.

Treachery and savagery of the Bolsheviks, and of Rasputin.

Yes, its all a rich tapestry...

 

 

I believe the concept was that if the European leadership were somewhat related, they'd be less likely to engage in senseless wars that ultimately cost a lot of money and manpower. Worked for...a while...lol.

This is pretty cool....building a big gun.

 

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Flamethrower development in WW1.

My recollection from the history books was that the flamethrower first saw use at the Battle of Hooge in 1915...part of the Ypres salient. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooge_in_World_War_I

hooge1.gif

https://ourfamilyatwar.wordpress.com/2015/07/30/german-flamethrowers-attack-hooge/

Though there were apparently incidents before that of both the French and Germans hosing down trenches with petrol and then setting them alight with mortars, grenades, etc.

The flamethrower reached the height of its use during the final Pacific Campaign island battles. Saipan, Iwo Jima, etc...

Forgotten Weapons does a good video on the WW2-->Viet-Nam era M2/M2A1 Flamethrower

 

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The Battle of Kursk...tanks, tanks and more tanks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kursk

A German offensive into a fortified tank-trap doesn't go well...Guderian had warned them all...but was ignored.

 

Edited by DogOnPorch
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Restored T-34/85 getting-up to a fair clip of speed.

Imagine several dozen coming at you at once....and you've got an MP40 + a stick grenade.

:P

 

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The Parrott Gun...a step-up from the smoothbore cannons of the Napoleonic Wars. It had a rifled barrel...new...and a much simpler loading & firing procedure. Though, these fellows here below would need to pick-up the pace if this were Gettysburg or Antietam. They also had incredible range for the day (approx 2000 meter effective for the 20 lb)...and a near modern muzzle velocity (12-1500 ft per second). 

 It came in numerous sizes (by projectile weight) and saw action in most of the wars of the day. The really big models protected major forts. Naturally, the Confederates didn't have a lot of these. But, they slowly managed to get a fair number by capturing Union batteries at the various battles that they were victorious at. Especially in 1862. The 30 lber below is likely a navy model as the 20 lber was the largest mass produced field artillery version. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parrott_rifle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20-pounder_Parrott_rifle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_artillery_in_the_American_Civil_War

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rifling

The 6 lber Napoleon...from 1841...was unique to the US Civil War/Mexican Wars/Indian Wars. Based on the classic smoothbore Napoleonic cannon. The thing that made this old gun still a player in the 1860s was that it could be employed as a battery sized shotgun...blasting great swaths through any exposed advancing troops.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M1841_6-pounder_field_gun

unnamed.jpg.e86184cc80d27b3efe5eeb2d0b5f4b6c.jpg

 

 

 

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BBC Collections

How They Dug The Victoria Line (1969)

The constant low rumble of the London Underground made me ill at first. 

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I know there has been a LOT of activity by me in this club the past few days...just waiting-out a family medical emergency...you know how those things go.

How we cope...

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1 minute ago, DogOnPorch said:

I know there has been a LOT of activity by me in this club the past few days...just waiting-out a family medical emergency...you know how those things go.

How we cope...

I hope everything turns out well.

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5 minutes ago, bcsapper said:

I hope everything turns out well.

 

Thanks, my friend.

Some of those Russkie movies are surprisingly good. Check 'em out if you haven't already.

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