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Enskat Kenraken Ronkwe

Caledonia problem didnt arise overnight

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If the agreements' purpose is to "preserve your culture"....then as far as housing goes, the government just need to provide you with tee-pees.

Give them their damm land and whatever pittence agreed upon and then let them on their own then post border guards around their land. When they need aid, they can sell or borrow like a nation does. If they do good then we can buy off them. If they want to fish commercially, then they can enter into a deal of some kind and pay tariffs or whatever. if they want Canadian goods or US, they can pay taxes for import and export.

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The bottom line is that the Crown -in its various incarnations- has to both live up to it commitments in the treaties and deal with unanswered questions using a non-Canadian court as the ultimate arbiter.

If the Crown botheres to meet its commitments, we would never have seen residential schools or Indian Acts or anything else that has eventually turned up to pit Aboriginal people against Canada, and now by extension, other Canadians.

Secondly, I don't believe a Canadian court will ever give a fair shake to First Nations who bring land claims before the courts, because the courts are made up of Canadian judges, and these judges have only the interest of the majority in mind. How can you ask a judge for a ruling if that judges' house or cottage lay on the land in question, or better yet, how can a judge rule for First Nations when they know that their ruling could set a precedent that brings ownership of their house or cottage into question.

Never happen.

Many Canadians may come online here and cry about the court system, but if there is one thing I kow for certain, the court system in this country is here exclusively to protect and support the rich, and there are very, very few rich Natives, ergo no support from the justice system.

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Oh c'mon, "we were here first", is not a valid argument.

Are you kidding Betsy?

Again, you have a thorough lack of understanding of Canadian history. Being here "first' is why the Crown has a legal relationship with the Aboriginal people in this country. That is why the Irish, the Italians, the Jamaicans, the Peruvians (oh, and Filipinos) and anyone else calling themselves an Ethnic group can't claim a legal relationship with the Crown....because they opted to come here.

As I've often said, the Crown did not sign treaties with the Native people here just because their skin was brown and their hair was black. The Crown signed treaties in Canada because they wanted a legal method of bringing title of the land under their authority, and the Proclamation issued by the King in 1763 already outlined the method to go about bringing these surrenders about.

That, to the great misfortune of many posters on these threads, is the history. People forget that the land called "Canada" was traded for all the benefits and rights that Aboriginal people have now. and as I often said, I would gladly give up the benefits and rights in exchange for the land, as per the original deal.

anytime, anywhere and on anyday.

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How have the Indians contributed to society in Canada? Any real examples?

Umm... Democracy. :D As a matter of fact, modern democractic states and their consitutions (esp. Canada, the US) and even the United Nations Charter are based on Haudenosaunee Law (which was written over 1000 years ago)

I really don't see what makes them so special compared to all the other races that built Canada that they deserve all this extra treatment.

We are nothing special geoffrey, and do not claim to be above or below anyone, eventhough federal policy insists we are sovereign-dependant wards of Canada, umm err, the Queen.

The fact is, the so-called extra treatment is a legal requirement the government of Canada committed to perpetually uphold by signing international contracts (treaties).

We can all talk and argue all we want about this sort of thing, but the fact remains - Canada owes over 100 Billion in arrears - not to mention the gross, common-place violation of treaties like what happened in Caledonia (the reason the Six Nations is disputing it is becuase in order for the Six Nations to sign a treaty, the entire Mohawk Council must be present, and be in 100% agreement -- this is required by our law.

This 'disputed' land was singed away back in the day, but only some of the Mohawk council was present - thus it is not a legal contract.)

As for Enskat's initial query, I had the same experience as others here - we made tipi's, and ate real-artifical bannock. Once though we travelled to an all-native school, and learned about Sweet Grass and Dream Catchers.

Trivial knowledge, in other words, that promotes tolerance but conveniently ignores reality, the history of violence, and the Canadian Goverment's Policies of legislated Genocide towards the First Nations People.

For instance, has anyone ever heard of the Sexual sterilization Act? Or about the thousands of children that were disappared while attending Residential Schools?

These are disgusting truths, and I apoligize for bringing it up here, but this is just a mere fraction of what we have experienced historically, and the fact that probably no one here knew about these two matters is proof of the problem, which has nothing to do with The Six Nations People (except they too have been involuntarily subject to this criminal behaviour as the rest of the Native populations in the Americas)

Lastly, as far as the situation in Caledonia goes - it is definitely not unique or isolated.

There was also Oka, Gustafsen Lake, Burnt Church, Ipperwash, Ahnishinabe Park, Sun Peaks, Grassy Narrows, Barriere Lake, Clayoquot Sound - and that's just off the top of my head.

Each situation happened exactly as how Caledonia started - the government criminally overstepped it's jurisdiction, and the Natives of the region did what they felt was best to resolve the situation - I mean, going to courts has proved moot. There are over 6000 unresolved land claims in the court right now... and the same goes for going to the UN, ICC, ICJ, or OAS. None of these heralding courts/organizations even acnkowledge the Indigenous Nations because we are not States, nor will we ever be... even if we unite and become a Continental Government (South America Included) we will still not be a state because we would not engage in any of the reticent behaviour of Western States. Why? Because it's antithetical to the needs of the people - it doesn't serve anyone.

So what's left? Do we do what the Palestinians do to the Israelis? Well no, because terrorism is as archaic and redundant as Colonialism.

We do what we have the resources and access to do. Sometimes things get stupid on our side, but what do you expect? At Gustafsen Lake, the RCMP shot over 20000 bullets, and there was only a handful of people there. At SunPeaks they arrested and Jailed Grandmothers. At Oka the SQ allowed the Canadians to throw rocks the size of baseballs at women, children, and old men. There was even one incident where a Six Nations Women was about to give birth - a crowd of Canadian Citizens stopped the ambulance that was taking her to the hospital, and one demanded that he get to look at her privates to see if she was concealing any weapons...

Despite these perverted and unnecessary actions - many believe that setting up roadblocks is the only resource available where we can get results.

Though there have been very few positive outcomes for either side, it's better than waiting for 5 generations for the Courts to refuse the case, or jimmy it so the next administraion can overturn and exploit it.

If the roles were reversed, who knows, maybe some of you would compromise your integrity, sacrifice your history, silence your voice, shun your culture - because that's what it takes to feel safe... i'd like to think that no one would do that, because without history and identity, you are nothing.

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Enskat I enjoy reading your thoughts on this topic. If find there is a calmness in your words. I enjoy Tem's too. Anyways, on the topic, I am 50 so my perspective is a bit different, but I feel I was not taught enough native history. I mean we did have it in Canadian history and in British history but as you can imagine it was from a very distorted point of view. I think it is impossible to understand the history of this country without properly covering it. I will say this as well. As a lawyer, I personally think all law schools should teach a course on the history of how law evolved in Canada and how it is so heavily influenced by aboriginal customs. I don't think people realize how much aboriginal customs and traditions are inter-twined with our laws' origins.

I also think aboriginal culture and its perspective on laws, values, society, etc., enrich anyone's soul if they want to try and learn and listen.

I can fully understand the frustration native peoples have with us non natives because of our lack of awareness of your cultures. I sometimes get frustrated when I hear people make gross generalizations about Jewish culture or religion, etc.

I myself resent not being taught enough native history and in a perspective that at least could have been neutral rather then the usual pro British point of view.

I can be quite disgusted of my ignorance with my own country's origins. I also find it unacceptable as a lawyer, I wasn't properly equipped to understand the origins of my country's laws and how they then were recycled and used against the very people that came up with them. To know where you are going you have to know where you came from.

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How have the Indians contributed to society in Canada? Any real examples?

Umm... Democracy. :D As a matter of fact, modern democractic states and their consitutions (esp. Canada, the US) and even the United Nations Charter are based on Haudenosaunee Law (which was written over 1000 years ago)

I really don't see what makes them so special compared to all the other races that built Canada that they deserve all this extra treatment.

We are nothing special geoffrey, and do not claim to be above or below anyone.......If the roles were reversed, who knows, maybe some of you would compromise your integrity, sacrifice your history, silence your voice, shun your culture - because that's what it takes to feel safe... i'd like to think that no one would do that, because without history and identity, you are nothing.

ahnee, Ahni:

I would like to commend you on your reply to Geoffrey regarding what Natives did for Canada, as I found it well thought out, lucid and informative.

However, I also want to point out that many non-Native people like to ask questions seeking to compare caucasian contributions and Aboriginal contributions to Canada because -thanks to our education system- all most Canadians know about Canada is what our caucasian population did, and even that only refers to the leaders ie Prime Minister's, Rail Barons, General's etc.

The other tack is for people like Geoffrey to take credit for everything in Canada because he likely shares the same racial background as all our Prime Ministers, and the same goes for people who invented cars and trains.

I find this attitude of taking credit for the work of others rather surprising. Many people of European extraction would never compare themselves to Hitler simply because of shared European heritage, but they take full credit for the invention of the snowmobile because "white people created it for society", even though they have nothing in relation to Armand Bombardier apart from a common heritage.

This can be even more amusing if you consider that Geoffrey and others with the same perspective may not be anything more than towel attendants at the local bath house, and yet they get online and said "well we did this and we did that...."

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Yes - Thank You for the post Ahni - I knew a little regarding the residential schools but i hadnt heard of the sterilisation program - so i am now searching for material about it. As well, im taking a closer look at the other locations where rights are being fought for.

Trivial knowledge, in other words, that promotes tolerance but conveniently ignores reality, the history of violence, and the Canadian Goverment's Policies of legislated Genocide towards the First Nations People.

For instance, has anyone ever heard of the Sexual sterilization Act? Or about the thousands of children that were disappared while attending Residential Schools?

These are disgusting truths, and I apoligize for bringing it up here, but this is just a mere fraction of what we have experienced historically, and the fact that probably no one here knew about these two matters is proof of the problem, which has nothing to do with The Six Nations People (except they too have been involuntarily subject to this criminal behaviour as the rest of the Native populations in the Americas)

Lastly, as far as the situation in Caledonia goes - it is definitely not unique or isolated.

There was also Oka, Gustafsen Lake, Burnt Church, Ipperwash, Ahnishinabe Park, Sun Peaks, Grassy Narrows, Barriere Lake, Clayoquot Sound - and that's just off the top of my head.

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Identity is not history. Identity is you. We are not bound by the actions of our fathers. People are people, distinct and individual, and need no backstory or context to be relevant. They simply are.

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Could you elaborate more on the point about Identity in regards to the topic of this thread - education/awareness - thanks.

One thing though - we are bound to the actions of our fathers if they entered into a signed legal agreement.

And if not...... when is the government going to hand over the lands they acquired through identical legal means?

Identity is not history. Identity is you. We are not bound by the actions of our fathers. People are people, distinct and individual, and need no backstory or context to be relevant. They simply are.

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However, I also want to point out that many non-Native people like to ask questions seeking to compare caucasian contributions and Aboriginal contributions to Canada because -thanks to our education system- all most Canadians know about Canada is what our caucasian population did, and even that only refers to the leaders ie Prime Minister's, Rail Barons, General's etc.

You're right Temagami, and I should take a step back and be a little more patient.

There are actually alot of other contributions that have been made too. The Haudenosaunee were actually advanced geneticists. They had over 100 varieties of corn BC (Before Colonialism :lol: ) and I tell you, it wasn't that cattle corn crap that most of us are customed to eating now. They also played lacrosse, which is what hockey is based on. There was also the invention of snowshoes, Vaseline (olefin hydrocarbons and methane to make petroleum jelly), canoes, snow goggles, and chewing gum (from the Spruce tree) to name a few more.

Another interesting thing - if anyones ever heard of the Three Sisters before (Corn, Beans, and Squash) when grown together, not in private sections like we do with our (extremely redundant and wasteful though extremely profitable) annual crops - the three sisters create a perfectly self-sustaining relationship. They provide each other with the nutrients the others' lack, and protect each other from various insects and other diseases that would otherwise decimate them.

Cheers Enskat.

Ahni

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I am amazed at one poster's comments about not wanting to study aboriginal history and then making sweeping statements.

Here is what I will say. For me there are two academic issues. Yes you can argue, that Native Studies, is a seperate academic subject. I understand that and understand why in universities, it is referred to as Native Studies so that it can facilitate studying it.

However I wish to make an arguement that it also should be taught not seperate from but as part of Canadian history and Canadian history should not be taught without it.

I fail to understand how one can study Canadian history and its origins without

inter-connecting the study of its native peoples to the Vikings and Cabot and Cartiers and everyone who came after that and started New France, etc.

I did learn some native history as part of Canadian history but it was isolated and it gave me the impression it was just an aside as all the emphasis was placed on the British Empire and the perspective from the British eye.

I would like to have been taught for example who the Northeastern Iriquoian peoples were and how they lived, i.e., the Huron and Iroquois. I also very much would have wanted to learn about the Algonquians (MicMac, Montagnais, Algonquin,

Attikamek, Nippissing, Abenaki, Ottawa and Ojibway).

I mean how can you study Canada and know where all the names of our cities and towns and geopgraphic areas come from and not know how they are related to these people?

I would have wanted to know how all these people lived, etc.

I also would have liked to have learned more about the Plains Indians such as the Cree. I did learn about the Metis and Louis Riel but again specifically in reference to his uprising but no in depth or for that matter any attention spent on the Plains Indians lives and activities.

I also think to properly understand Canadian history I would have loved to have learned about West Coast natives such as the Tlingit, Tsimshian, Auxwalk, Kwakwaka'waka, Salish, and Nuu-Chah-Nulth. Yes I did learn a little bit about Haida but from what I was taught you would think only the Haida lived out on the West coast.

As for the Inuit, honestly when I was taught about them, they were called eskimos and I was given a book about a little Eskimo boy who hunted seals with a spear and got lost on an ice flow. Not exactly what we would call history.

I suppose you could make an arguement that the history of the Southern Algonquins (Illinois, Shawnee, Miami, Potawatami, Menominee, Saluk, Fox, Kickapoo) and Southeatern Native peoples (Calussa, Semanole, Timucaa, Creek, Choctaw, Alabama, Chickasaw, Biloxi, Catauba, Cherokee, Caddon, etc.)

is more part of American history but I would have at least liked to know whether they politically influenced natives in Canada and/or Canadian history in general.

Today I have to try read about it on my own and it's a bit of a piss off because I can't believe how integral it is in understanding where our current laws and political institutions come from.

If you don't study the conflict resolution systems of these people for example, you get the impression British or French laws were the first laws used to settle disputes and you wouldn't understand how British common law, took into consideration and incorporated aboriginal conflict resolution models

when it settled disputes in Canada, particularly in regards to equity or how the North West Mounted Police settled disputes without guns and without the need for formal trials.

One absolutely integral area is the aboriginal concept of not owning land but sharing it with the mother earth and being a guest or an interactive participant with a living organism called the mother earth. Its not just a spiritual or native concept. It is now a concept used through-out the world when shaping international law and environmental laws that deal with more than one jurisdiction.

Then there is the whole matter of the myriad of legal agreements or treaties entered into that have been broken before and after confederation between provinicial and federal governments and native peoples or their nations.

I mean here we are discussing Quebec in terms of whether it can be a soverign nation but how many people have been taught about its native people's valid legal rights to three quarters of the province and the native peoples rights to seperate and take that land with them if Quebec tries to become sovereign? I never was taught anything about the native peoples of Quebec and their legal rights other than quick references again to who fought with the British and French.

So I have been very specific because I believe all of the above should be in Canadian history courses and not seperate Native Studies. I believe Native Studies should be pursued but as an addition to or a further specialization as to the above.

I think my lack of learning this history makes me a poor lawyer and very much makes me intellectually challenged in terms of having to catch up with this to properly understand a current legal dispute with native issues as to land use or ownership or rights.

I mean how can we properly understand laws dealing with the off shore rights, environment, natural resources and fisheries for example without having this back-ground?

So the poster's comments about encouraging guilt is ridiculous. Then again where have I heard that before....we are sick of the holocaust....why should we have to learn about it....yep....ignore what happened with our own native peoples and then you wonder why the holocaust happened and why it continues in Rawanda and Burundi or Darfur, Sudan....Cambodia, with the Kurds in Iraq, Armanians, etc.

I also think it provides a valuable resource to use to resolve conflicts for current disputes with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and so many other current conflicts where competing peoples claim equal rights to the land.

I also think to properly learn Canadian history and the role the Christian church played in Canadian history, it has to be examined in context to how the church operated as an agent to try obliterate native culture and forcefully move native children and proseltyze them and terrorize them etc. I mean how can you understand the current Charter of Rights and our Human Rights Codes without examining the wide spread mistreatment of natives in the school, social services and hospital systems. Its not a matter of guilt. Its a matter of understanding why we have the laws today and what led us to enacting them.

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The writer is a liberal and now he is feeling threatened. I thought this was apprapro for this thread.

Law no longer rules in Caledonia

A group of native protesters has been flouting the law for more than two months and government just watches

Friday June 2, 2006

MATT WALCOFF

RECORD STAFF

(Originally published May 31, 2006)

Good liberal that I am, I have always tried to be on the side of the aboriginal inhabitants of North America. Lately, though, I've been hit with a bout of cognitive dissonance over the standoff in Caledonia.

News reports about members of the Six Nations taking over part of the town, destroying property and making life miserable for the citizenry challenged my impression of the Iroquois as a group of underappreciated victims of the perfidy of the white man.

Last weekend, I decided to check out the situation in Caledonia for myself. Initially, I saw little sign of conflict. The barricades looked more like a picket line in a labour dispute than parts of a war zone.

I had no intention of involving myself in the dispute, but I thought it would be cool to snap a picture of the barricades from a safe distance for posterity. I stopped my car on the other side of the street, away from the disputed property. I clicked the button and prepared to be on my way.

How foolish of me to believe the laws of Canada were in effect in Caledonia.

Immediately, a one-eyed protester came darting across the street, motioning to me to roll down my window. I complied, which was my second mistake.

"Gimme your film," he said.

"I'm sorry?" I asked.

"Give me your film. We have authority from the OPP to take your film."

I found it ironic that someone challenging the authority of the government of Ontario would use the OPP as his justification to harass a passer-by. My journalist's instincts set in. I told the one-eyed protester that one, the camera was digital and two, that I was on a public road and had the right to take a picture.

"What public road," my inquisitor asked.

"This one. Highway 6."

"This was Highway 6," he said with a humph. "It's our lane now."

Two more protesters, a man and a woman, joined this unscheduled customs inspection. The man opened one of the back doors of the car and began searching my things for my camera; the woman yelled and gesticulated while rifling through the stuff on my passenger seat.

To his credit, the one-eyed man began to explain how protesters had received threats and feared retaliation if photos were disseminated. I replied that I was from out of town and had no vested interests in his dispute.

I tried to explain that I would be happy to erase any images of him and his friends from my camera if they would just step back from my car.

But by the time I explained that, his colleagues had realized the camera was in the little cubbyhole under my elbow. The second man grabbed me by the throat and pulled me back so the woman could reach in and grab my camera.

"You just lost your camera!" she said, skipping back to the barricade.

My protestations that I was going to delete the pictures met with a gleeful smile.

"You snooze, you lose," she said.

The one-eyed man, though, offered me a deal. If I would show him my driver's licence and let him take down my personal information, they would return my camera, minus the pictures. Seeing little choice in the matter, I handed over my licence, hoping the occupiers weren't going to abscond with that, too.

In the end, the protesters returned my camera after deleting every picture, including the ones that had nothing to do with Caledonia. The woman let me off with a warning:

"If we see these pictures anywhere, we know where you live."

How I was going to do anything with the pictures they had deleted, I haven't the faintest.

In their five-minute encounter with me, the protesters had broken several laws -- interfering with traffic, assault, robbery and extortion among them. Throughout the incident, an OPP officer, perhaps 40 metres away, watched and did nothing. I suppose the one-eyed man was right when he said the protesters were operating with the sanction of the police.

Of course, my minor trauma is nothing compared to what the residents of Caledonia have been dealing with since the occupation of a housing-construction site began in February.

Vandals behind the barricades have destroyed a bridge and knocked out power for thousands of homes. Serious accidents have resulted from the diversion of vehicles onto side roads not suited for the traffic. Local businesses have lost thousands of dollars as customers elect not to run a gauntlet to go shopping.

Until the protesters removed a barrier on Argyle Street last week, people who lived on the road could only enter or leave their homes with the permission of the occupiers. They could not have visitors and were subject to an 11 p.m. curfew -- imposed by the protesters, not by any lawful authority. The local newspaper reported one Argyle Street youth has had to move away from home, since no school-bus driver dares to pick him up.

What is going on in Caledonia is not a noble struggle of members of an oppressed minority asserting their civil rights. This is not a 1960 sit-in at a Georgia Woolworth's lunch counter. This is a gang of militant thugs victimizing the law-abiding citizens of Haldimand County, emboldened by the timidity of a province and country paralyzed by political correctness and the fear that one of the occupiers might get hurt.

The Ontario government has responded to the crisis as if it was a teachers' strike, sending in David Peterson to negotiate. But the occupation is not a political dispute; it is a long-running criminal act.

We do not negotiate with bank robbers or drunk drivers. We arrest them and throw them in jail. If they resist? Well, that's why cops have handcuffs, nightsticks and tear-gas grenades.

I'm sure some readers still think the occupiers are the victims, automatically deserving of sympathy as people of colour fighting The Man. Those sympathizers should take note: The Six Nations radicals claim all land within six miles of the Grand River. That includes all of Waterloo, Kitchener and Cambridge. If the occupiers are able to get their way in Caledonia through violence and intimidation, you might wake up next year to find your street under occupation.

Matt Walcoff is a business reporter for The Record

http://www.therecord.com/links/links_06060211027.html

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There's a similar incident again, this the time the Star reports.

Really, why are there two sets of laws in this country? And McGuinty offers sympathy - really - how about some law and order.

http://tinyurl.com/h2oa9 (Toronto Star)

TV crew attacked in Caledonia - OPP officers ignored assault, camera operators complain

Jun. 9, 2006. 06:50 PM

CALEDONIA, Ont. — Two news cameramen were assaulted by protesters today, prompting Premier Dalton McGuinty to condemn the latest violence at the site of an aboriginal occupation in Caledonia, Ont.

The CH TV camera operators, one of whom needed stitches to close a head wound, said Ontario Provincial Police did nothing despite their pleas for help.

"The police were right behind me and I asked for protection," said Ken MacKay, a CH TV camera operator.

"I said, `I'm being assaulted, I need protection, they're trying to steal my camera' and nothing happened.

"(The attackers) wrestled the camera away from me and took it and left me, and they got the tape out."

Police said they were investigating the assault at the location near Hamilton, where aboriginal protesters took over a building site in February.

In Edmonton where he was meeting with the country's premiers, McGuinty expressed dismay at the attack.

"It was with great disappointment that I learned of the violent incidents in Caledonia," he said in a statement.

"I would like to express sympathy and concern for those injured."

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There's a similar incident again, this the time the Star reports.

Really, why are there two sets of laws in this country? And McGuinty offers sympathy - really - how about some law and order.

I just saw that incident on CTV newsnet. Apparently the reporters were covering an altercation happening between the protesters and an older couple. Another civilian who witnessed the attacks on the reporters ran to help them but it was too late. The thieves already took the camera away.

Why are the cops not intervening at all??? What's happening?

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This has gone on long enough. ELderly people being attacked, the press having threr equip,ent stolen. I want my community back this is terriable. The power outage was bad enough now all this. Throw all the protestors that are breaking the law in jail.

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Maybe something will be done now that the press are being assaulted, they can press the issue in their papers. Not only the press, but tourists assaulted and robbed, residents harrassed in their own homes .... this is a serious breakdown of peace, order, and good gov't.

McGuinty etal need to take some responsibility now, and restore order but everyone is afraid. The judge issued a court order, but the police via Dildo did not enforce that order. It is time now for the Feds to take over - but I'm guessing they don't have the gonads either. Wonder if someone has to die before they do.

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I'm on my way to Six Nation's in a few minutes. I hope none of those Caledonian racists get in my face while I'm delivering food. I saw this morning's comfromtation, and, as usual, the media isn't giving the whole truth, but that's no surprise...look who makes up the media.

On second thought, I do hope that some of those racists come on to me. so I can show them proper manners.

Everyone should be thankful that at least one of us here is not just talking about Caledonia, but actually doing something about it.

Semper Fi!

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I saw this morning's comfromtation, and, as usual, the media isn't giving the whole truth, but that's no surprise...look who makes up the media.

On second thought, I do hope that some of those racists come on to me. so I can show them proper manners.

Everyone should be thankful that at least one of us here is not just talking about Caledonia, but actually doing something about it.

Semper Fi!

Temagami Scourge

You're right, everyone is so thankful for what you are doing in Caledonia.

OPP officer hurt in Caledonia clash

"One [camera operator] was swarmed, assaulted and had his camera stolen," Pilon said.

"The third incident involved the theft of a motor vehicle, which was swarmed, its occupants forcibly removed and [the] vehicle taken.

"An OPP officer [was] deliberately driven at by the stolen vehicle. Other officers at the scene, fortunately, pulled him to safety," Pilon said. Three people were arrested Friday night on charges of breaching the peace, but police hope to make more arrests on charges that include attempted murder, robbery, intimidation and causing bodily harm.

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Does that include the residents of Caledonia? And the organised few that are present stirring up hate amongst the residents of Caledonia? seems some media agencies are one sided.

And they claim all these thing happened right in from of the OPP!?!!? I DONT THINK SO!!

If the events transpired as told --- I have full confidence that the OPP would have acted immediately.

This has gone on long enough. ELderly people being attacked, the press having threr equip,ent stolen. I want my community back this is terriable. The power outage was bad enough now all this. Throw all the protestors that are breaking the law in jail.

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The usual people on the forum seem to have derailed this topic - which was education. I guess most of you didnt read the beginning portions of this thread, and the positive discussion that began. All it took was one OFF TOPIC post by scriblett and we find ourselves back at it. Afraid of positive discussion scrib?

Temagami makes a good point about hands on involvement, in his case delivering food to the site. I should go down to the site to see what I can do to help out. Staring down the organised racist agitators fueling this fire, and fanning the flames with the worry of Caledonia residents - would be the least i could do to start.

Without evidence - all these stories are all hearsay. even if they are in the paper, it doesnt make it true without proof - let me see for myself. A paper with bias! and unsubstatiated facts! OH my Gosh!! * surprised look with hands on cheeks *

As far as my personal experiences at the site - ive never felt threatened or intimidated in the slightest, maybe its because i dont throw insults, slurs and disrespect at anybody.

All good debate on the original topic of the thread is over. Which i realise is just a smokescreen by the idiots who couldnt respond intelligently or add anything positive to the topical argument - so they have to begin throwing dirt.

since reading your posts ive been watching the news reports for video of these incidents - so far i havnt seen one - until i witness it with my own eyes, im taking any media information with a grain of salt.

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Again I say - I find it impossible to beleive that the OPP would sit by and witness these events and not act on them. Id love to see unedited footage of what was filmed there.

There's a similar incident again, this the time the Star reports.

Really, why are there two sets of laws in this country? And McGuinty offers sympathy - really - how about some law and order.

I just saw that incident on CTV newsnet. Apparently the reporters were covering an altercation happening between the protesters and an older couple. Another civilian who witnessed the attacks on the reporters ran to help them but it was too late. The thieves already took the camera away.

Why are the cops not intervening at all??? What's happening?

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How the hell does the U.S. Border Patrol get involved in this thing anyways?? Are the natives a threat at all to the U.S.? From the articles I am reading it is about them observing how we handle things.

Why? What purpose does that serve?

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According to this and other reports, arrests are in the works.

http://calsun.canoe.ca/News/National/2006/...625704-sun.html

CALEDONIA, Ont. -- The OPP were securing arrest warrants yesterday for seven people accused in violent flare-ups in Caledonia stemming from an unresolved Native land claim.

On Friday and into early yesterday, townspeople and Six Nations members clashed in explosive confrontations over the natives' occupation of a housing development still under construction.

OPP officers were expected to arrest the suspects in connection with the charges -- ranging from robbery to attempted murder -- sometime yesterday.

The seven face a battery of charges after angry protesters surrounded a U.S. Border Patrol vehicle on Friday and dragged out its three occupants before taking over the vehicle

"They were forcibly removed after they were swarmed," OPP Const. Doug Graham said yesterday.

An injured police officer was pulled out of the path of the stolen Border Patrol vehicle as it was driven deliberately at him, Graham said yesterday.

Graham said the officer was treated and released. The stolen vehicle was recovered but no arrests were made.

Officers from the U.S. Border Patrol were in the area to observe how provincial police were handling the standoff, Graham added.

Other charges police expect to lay against the protesters include theft of a motor vehicle, robbery, intimidation and assault causing bodily harm, he said.

The incident was just one of several confrontations with protesters on Friday that are related to the charges.

"We have identified several suspects that had been involved in these incidents," said deputy OPP commissioner Maurice Pilon.

Pilon said most, if not all, the suspects are members of Six Nations.

The Six Nations Confederacy yesterday called the violence "disheartening. . .......

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I'm on my way to Six Nation's in a few minutes. I hope none of those Caledonian racists get in my face while I'm delivering food. I saw this morning's comfromtation, and, as usual, the media isn't giving the whole truth, but that's no surprise...look who makes up the media.

On second thought, I do hope that some of those racists come on to me. so I can show them proper manners.

Everyone should be thankful that at least one of us here is not just talking about Caledonia, but actually doing something about it.

Semper Fi!

And you see the attitude here. I agree, this has gone on too long. This poster should be in jail. The courts need to reassert basic laws. There was a hearing last week in which the judge threatened the Attorney General and OPP commisioner with contempt citations. I hope these latest incidents decide him to finally order the rabble and thugs cleared from the roads or else.

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Another one from the ww.globeandmail.com

Ontario police seek arrest warrants after Caledonia violence

www.globeandmail.com

In announcing the warrants on Saturday, deputy OPP commissioner Maurice Pilon said his greatest fear was that someone would be hurt over the course of the standoff.

"Unfortunately that has occurred," Mr. Pilon said. "And I don't think that's acceptable."

Premier Dalton McGuinty said Friday he's angry about the way some people at the blockade are behaving, and said he hopes they don't destroy efforts to find a peaceful resolution to the dispute.

Critics are blaming the legacy of the Ipperwash standoff, where aboriginal protester Dudley George was killed by a police bullet in 1995, for the reluctance of police to crack down on unruly protesters."

Gee, McGuint's angry, well so are many people - at McGuinty for not doing anything. He's like a rabbit in headlights - too scared to do anything.

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