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betsy

Criticizing the Government's "Slow" Response to Lebanese

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I will bash any Canadian that finds themsemselves in such circunstance by their own doing

So basically what you are saying is that people who cant find jobs in Canada that pay a decent salary, say a Teacher with a Masters degree in Physics should take a job flipping burgers, or better yet file for Social Assistance, rather than work overseas and pay Cdn taxes? Or someone with a degree or experience in Business Management should be working at Walmart, instead of taking a job as CEO with a European or Western Manufacturer who has major manufacturing plants in China, or Japan, or India, or has business interests in the Middle East?

As usual, a post that is devoid of any knowledge of the Global Economy and Work Force. The problem I think with a lot of posters is that they are like maybe 19 years old and still living at home with their parents, or going to school and havent encountered the "real world" yet. :blink:

Get on an international flight these days and the majority of people heading out in September are WHITE teachers, going to teach overseas ....... along with hundreds of business people also working overseas.

The thing is, to make it as simple as possible, is that major companies have business interests, plants, offices etc ALL OVER THE WORLD and not just here in Canada or the US and so people work ALL OVER THE WORLD ... and these people are Canadians.

Also in case you havent noticed people DO have the RIGHT to travel, and vacation overseas. Hawaii gets old after awhile ...

No one could have seen this coming ..... not this full scale invasion and flattening of Lebanon. Tradiionally areas in Lebanon and Israel are tourist Mecas, its a beautiful area of the world, and it was on my list of places I wanted to travel to ........ The companies they work for should have been monitoring the situation and should have been ready to send people out of there, but this took everyone by surprise, and once the airport was blown up ........ well it kind of changed things didnt it?.

Christians often travel them for spiritual reasons, history buffs, anthropoligists, people have a lot of reasons for wanting to be there, other than sun, sea and sand, which is also has in abundance as well ---

people from Poland or something
What you really mean is "white people" and that doesnt warrant a comment.

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Clearly you have not travelled and are not aware of how high temperatures in the Middle East can rise, and how threatening they can be to people's health, nor have you ever been in a situation where water was not available and not aware of how dangerous it can be to NOT have water.

Maybe Kindred can tell us 'what the responsibility is of the Lebanese government to protect people or at least supply basics like food and water to people trapped within it's borders?'

Or do they actually not believe living in a volitile region like their living in as to to not be equipped for situations or emergencies such as this one.

Kindred goes on to promote the international community when he or she discounts one of the great advantages of being Canadian and that is 'everthing is at home' and between Canada and the U.S. we have EVERTHING one could possibly want.

My Global Ecopnomy is right here Kindred and I wish you would go back to your REAL WORLD.

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we have EVERTHING one could possibly want

Except jobs, affordable housing, a viable Health Care System, reasonable taxes, programs for the poor and disabled, housing for Seniors, a good education system, and a PM Canadians can be proud of, and oh yah, jobs for all the University graduates ...........

My Global Ecopnomy is right here Kindred and I wish you would go back to your REAL WORLD.

And I wish you would move out of your parents basement and buy your own home, pay the same taxes (54%) that myself and other pay, and stop judging the world and others from your narrow little world, which is CLEARLY not the world of an adult coping with the problems that exist in Canada ...... and CLEARLY not the business world ........ I can the distinct impression that you are in your early 20's, (if that) single and not involved in the "REAL" world .....

It amuses me how the little minded very young posters on this forum keep telling Canadians to get out of "their" Canada, because we dont agree with your childish observations of the world. Kind of like being on a "playground" with little babies crying "get out of my sandbox .. " :D

Do you know the definition of "Global" ?

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It amuses me how the little minded very young posters on this forum keep telling Canadians to get out of "their" Canada, because we dont agree with your childish observations of the world. Kind of like being on a "playground" with little babies crying "get out of my sandbox .. "

Do you know the definition of "Global" ?

I wish you would stop using worn out copy cat old cliches " Kind of like being in a playground with little babies crying 'get out of my sandbox." Ha- Ha- Ha. Is that the best you can do? Talk about immature.

Canada has pretty well always been dealing with the rest of the world on a global basis. And the rest of the world as not really significally added to Canada's fortunes.

Multiculturalism has destroyed Canadian identity.

But to be honest I would prefer to keep Canadian immigration 'White' and compatible with the lifestyle of Canadians for the simple reason of maintaining a sense of Canadianism.

The country would be that way if it was not for Tudeau's destructive multicultural nonsense which somehow managed to convince or force the country to 'oh yeah sure ...we are a country of immigrants'.

But he made the major mistake of NOT properly defining immigration as ' immigrants are not Canadian' and they bring with them a vast array of foreign beliefs and religions, political garbage (dragging Canada into their conflicts) and values or rather lack of values that are NOT compatible with Canadian lifestyles and are destructive to existing Canadian culture.

You are an arrogant individual my friend.

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Canada’s trade with the European Union continues to rise in absolute terms. Two-way trade in goods and services totalled $73.8 billion in 2000, up just over 100% from 1991. According to Statistics Canada, this country’s $21.0 billion in merchandise exports to the EU accounted for 4.6% of our total goods exports, while our imports, which have grown markedly since 1991, stood at $33.6 billion. Exports of services in 2000, in the order of $8.9 billion (against imports of $10.3 billion), were also significant. Over the years, merchandise exports to Europe have displayed moderate growth: a 75% increase, in absolute terms, over the 1993-2000 period.

Europe is also the first destination for Canada’s exports after the United States. Excluding our neighbour to the south, the EU accounted for 47% of export growth between 1990-98, double the growth of exports to the Asian Tigers over that period. Exports to Europe have risen, on average, by at least $1 billion per year over the past six years — a not insignificant amount, though as Bertin Côté (Assistant Deputy Minister, Europe, Middle-East and North Africa, DFAIT), remarked to the Sub-Committee, one year’s growth in exports to the U.S. would exceed total Canadian exports to the EU. Set against our economic relationship with the U.S., the importance of Europe to Canada, both on the trade and investment side, is not always appreciated. Even so, the trade results should not be treated lightly, as they lead to considerable employment opportunities for Canadians.

Susan Cartwright (Acting Assistant Deputy Minister, Europe, Middle East and Africa, DFAIT) informed the Sub-Committee that six of Canada’s top ten non-U.S. export markets are located in Europe. Within the EU, Canada’s two biggest export markets are the United Kingdom ($6.4 billion in merchandise exports in 2000), and Germany ($3.1 billion); these two countries also account for Canada’s largest sources of imports from the EU.

................................... While exports have not kept pace with EU economic growth, foreign direct investment (FDI) has become the most dynamic element of the transatlantic economic relationship. In 2000, the stock of Canada’s cumulative direct investment in the EU amounted to $56.5 billion, with that of investment from the EU totalling $77.9 billion. The latter figure includes a substantial increase of $28.3 billion from the 1999 results, owing mainly to French company Alcatel’s purchase of the Kanata, Ontario-based Newbridge Networks, and the sale of Seagram Co. to Vivendi SA, also of France. This increase in French investment in Canada meant that in 2000 they surpassed Canada’s traditional number-two source of FDI, the United Kingdom.

Even if one recognizes that 2000’s jump in FDI may have been atypical, Canada has enjoyed strong growth in investment with Europe during the past decade. Our investment in Europe rose by a more than healthy 174% over the 1990-2000 period, a rate of growth that exceeded the comparable figure for the U.S. (157%). In 2000, Europe accounted for almost 19% (up from 12% in 1983) of direct Canadian investment abroad. How this growth in investment will be affected by the bursting of the high-technology bubble in late 2000 and early 2001 remains to be seen. It is worth noting in this context that Nortel, for instance, has laid off a large percentage of its staff in France.

According to Mr. Clarke, this FDI boom can be attributed to Canada’s high-tech firms, whose activities have supplemented the existing large-scale operations and facilities of traditional Canadian investors such as Bombardier, Nortel, Alcan, and CAE. The largest sectors attracting Canadian direct investments have been finance and insurance; metals and metal products; communications; and food, beverage and tobacco industries.

Many Canadian firms have been strategically investing in certain European countries, which act as gateways into the European market as a whole or at least segments of it. The experience has been that Canadian firms have concentrated their activities on the United Kingdom — it is by far the number one destination for our investment in Europe, with over 350 Canadian firms established there — and Ireland. Together these two countries (United Kingdom $25.3 billion; Ireland $8.4 billion) accounted for 60% of Canadian investment in the EU in 2000. Our companies are also well represented in many western European cities outside of these two countries (e.g. Stockholm or Copenhagen serving the northern European market and Amsterdam or Brussels for mid-Europe).

Increasingly, it has become accepted that investment has overtaken trade as the most important market penetration strategy available to business. Typically, the motivation behind FDI has been either to service the target market more easily or, in certain instances, to bypass trade barriers by setting up operations in that market. What has also become recognized is that, as a general rule, trade has tended to follow investment.

I was going to find other statistics but for someone to post that Canada doesnt benefit from International connections and markets really isnt worth reponding to
Canada has pretty well always been dealing with the rest of the world on a global basis. And the rest of the world as not really significally added to Canada's fortunes
As I said you dont seem to know what is happening in the "real" world
You are an arrogant individual my friend
Coming from a self admitted racist, thats good .. better arrogant than ignorant ........ my non-white friends are twice the human being you appear to be, and pay a helluva lot more taxes than I am willing to bet you do ......

Heres a thought if you are ever in need of Medical Assistance and God forbid you get a doctor who isnt "white" why dont you refuse to be treated - stand up for you principles Leafless --

Racist, narrow minded, uneducated, and ignorant of the world outside your own door .... if thats an example of being white and superior it aint saying much for your credibility ....... or character ...

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Of course we could just IMPORT and do no EXPORT to offset the cost, wonder why our Politicians are working so hard to establish a greater presence overseas, now that would be really difficult if no one was allowed to ever leave Canada and had their Citizenship revoked when they did.

Harper is overseas right now, lets pull his Citizenship ...... :D and not let him back into Canada

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Canada’s trade with the European Union continues to rise in absolute terms. Two-way trade in goods and services totalled $73.8 billion in 2000, up just over 100% from 1991. According to Statistics Canada, this country’s $21.0 billion in merchandise exports to the EU accounted for 4.6% of our total goods exports, while our imports, which have grown markedly since 1991, stood at $33.6 billion. Exports of services in 2000, in the order of $8.9 billion (against imports of $10.3 billion), were also significant. Over the years, merchandise exports to Europe have displayed moderate growth: a 75% increase, in absolute terms, over the 1993-2000 period.

Europe is also the first destination for Canada’s exports after the United States. Excluding our neighbour to the south, the EU accounted for 47% of export growth between 1990-98, double the growth of exports to the Asian Tigers over that period. Exports to Europe have risen, on average, by at least $1 billion per year over the past six years — a not insignificant amount, though as Bertin Côté (Assistant Deputy Minister, Europe, Middle-East and North Africa, DFAIT), remarked to the Sub-Committee, one year’s growth in exports to the U.S. would exceed total Canadian exports to the EU. Set against our economic relationship with the U.S., the importance of Europe to Canada, both on the trade and investment side, is not always appreciated. Even so, the trade results should not be treated lightly, as they lead to considerable employment opportunities for Canadians.

Susan Cartwright (Acting Assistant Deputy Minister, Europe, Middle East and Africa, DFAIT) informed the Sub-Committee that six of Canada’s top ten non-U.S. export markets are located in Europe. Within the EU, Canada’s two biggest export markets are the United Kingdom ($6.4 billion in merchandise exports in 2000), and Germany ($3.1 billion); these two countries also account for Canada’s largest sources of imports from the EU.

................................... While exports have not kept pace with EU economic growth, foreign direct investment (FDI) has become the most dynamic element of the transatlantic economic relationship. In 2000, the stock of Canada’s cumulative direct investment in the EU amounted to $56.5 billion, with that of investment from the EU totalling $77.9 billion. The latter figure includes a substantial increase of $28.3 billion from the 1999 results, owing mainly to French company Alcatel’s purchase of the Kanata, Ontario-based Newbridge Networks, and the sale of Seagram Co. to Vivendi SA, also of France. This increase in French investment in Canada meant that in 2000 they surpassed Canada’s traditional number-two source of FDI, the United Kingdom.

Even if one recognizes that 2000’s jump in FDI may have been atypical, Canada has enjoyed strong growth in investment with Europe during the past decade. Our investment in Europe rose by a more than healthy 174% over the 1990-2000 period, a rate of growth that exceeded the comparable figure for the U.S. (157%). In 2000, Europe accounted for almost 19% (up from 12% in 1983) of direct Canadian investment abroad. How this growth in investment will be affected by the bursting of the high-technology bubble in late 2000 and early 2001 remains to be seen. It is worth noting in this context that Nortel, for instance, has laid off a large percentage of its staff in France.

According to Mr. Clarke, this FDI boom can be attributed to Canada’s high-tech firms, whose activities have supplemented the existing large-scale operations and facilities of traditional Canadian investors such as Bombardier, Nortel, Alcan, and CAE. The largest sectors attracting Canadian direct investments have been finance and insurance; metals and metal products; communications; and food, beverage and tobacco industries.

Many Canadian firms have been strategically investing in certain European countries, which act as gateways into the European market as a whole or at least segments of it. The experience has been that Canadian firms have concentrated their activities on the United Kingdom — it is by far the number one destination for our investment in Europe, with over 350 Canadian firms established there — and Ireland. Together these two countries (United Kingdom $25.3 billion; Ireland $8.4 billion) accounted for 60% of Canadian investment in the EU in 2000. Our companies are also well represented in many western European cities outside of these two countries (e.g. Stockholm or Copenhagen serving the northern European market and Amsterdam or Brussels for mid-Europe).

Increasingly, it has become accepted that investment has overtaken trade as the most important market penetration strategy available to business. Typically, the motivation behind FDI has been either to service the target market more easily or, in certain instances, to bypass trade barriers by setting up operations in that market. What has also become recognized is that, as a general rule, trade has tended to follow investment.

I was going to find other statistics but for someone to post that Canada doesnt benefit from International connections and markets really isnt worth reponding to
Canada has pretty well always been dealing with the rest of the world on a global basis. And the rest of the world as not really significally added to Canada's fortunes
As I said you dont seem to know what is happening in the "real" world
You are an arrogant individual my friend
Coming from a self admitted racist, thats good .. better arrogant than ignorant ........ my non-white friends are twice the human being you appear to be, and pay a helluva lot more taxes than I am willing to bet you do ......

Heres a thought if you are ever in need of Medical Assistance and God forbid you get a doctor who isnt "white" why dont you refuse to be treated - stand up for you principles Leafless --

Racist, narrow minded, uneducated, and ignorant of the world outside your own door .... if thats an example of being white and superior it aint saying much for your credibility ....... or character ...

Why the lengthy post brain boy import??

Why don't you crunch these UP TO DATE numbers if you can hack it...without it making yourself physically sick.

Canada exported goods worth some C$360 billion to the U.S. in 2005, which represents more than 80% of Canada's total global exports. Canada spent some C$250 billion on imports from the U.S. in 2005, some two-thirds of Canada's total imports.

However, it is important to note that the growth rate of Canada-U.S. trade is slowing. The value of goods delivered from Canada to the U.S. in 2005 increased only 3 percent from year 2000, while imports from the U.S. decreased 4 percent.

Countries in the European Economic Community (EEC) excluding the U.K. purchased $19 billion worth of Canadian exports in 2005 (4.2% of Canada's total exports). These same countries provided $29 billion worth of goods to Canada in 2005 (7.5% of Canada's total imports). EEC countries bolstered their consumption of Canadian exports by a healthy 14% over the past 5 years; Canada's imports from EEC countries increased about 40%.

Canadian exports to Japan were $10.5 billion (2.3%) in 2005, while Japan sent about $11.2 billion in imports to Canada (2.9%). Canadian exports to Japan decreased 7 percent in 2005 from year 2000, while imports from Japan decreased 4 percent.

Canadian exports to the U.K. in 2005 were $9.7 billion (2.1%), which slightly eclipsed the U.K.'s $9.1 billion in imports to Canada (2.3%). Exports to the U.K. showed a robust rise of some 33%, while imports from Canada's historical motherland decreased 26%.

The rest of the world including China and India bought $45 billion worth of Canadian exports in 2005 (10%), up almost 30% from year 2000. These emerging trade giants sold $79 billion worth of imports to Canada in 2005 (20%) growing some 60% from year 2000.

And The Winners Are...

As it stands now, the U.S. continues to keep Canada's surplus above water.

Canada ran a healthy surplus of over $100 billion trading with the U.S. in 2005, up over 17% from year 2000. Canada's surplus with the U.K. is much smaller, coming in at about $500 million. Canada's overall surplus in 2005 was some $65 billion.

However, Canada is running a deficit with its other major trading partners. Canadian deficits in 2005 with countries other than the U.S. and the U.K. was some $45 billion, more than double the comparable deficits which totaled $20.4 billion in year 2000.

Should Canada's deficits with major countries including China and India continue to expand, that amount could swell to a negative $130 billion in 7 years. This development could push Canada's overall balance of trade into the red even faster if the world economy goes into a recession.

Sources: Statistics Canada

BTW---You being an import snot does not impress me one iota and your name calling truly reflects your superior intellect.

Normally, we don't try to impress by posting a lengthy article but I made it an exception this one time as it was to GOOD to pass by.

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